• Who is Christ? Article by Michael Haykin

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2015 | John 19

    On December 16, 1739, George Whitefield preached a sermon on Matthew 22:42 at Bruton Parish Church in Williamsburg, Va., in which he asked his audience the very same question that Jesus had asked his hearers 1,700 years earlier: “What think ye of Christ?” The language Whitefield spoke was different from that of his Lord, but the eternal consequences of the answer were the same. Some of the answers of Jesus’ day—He was John the Baptist risen from the dead; He was one of the prophets; He was Elijah (see Mark 8:27-28)—were similar to answers given in Whitefield’s day. Deists such … View Resource

  • Justified by His Blood Article by Anthony Carter

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2011

    Have you ever wondered why God loves you and desires you in His eternal blessed presence? Have you ever contemplated (seriously) why God would look favorably on you and bless you rather than condemn you? Most of us (dare I say, all of us?) think more highly of ourselves than we ought. While very few of us would actually say it, we do live our lives as if there is something about us that makes God want to be our friend. Amazingly, we treat God like one of our earthly friends — we can’t help ourselves. We know why we … View Resource

  • Propitiation by His Blood Article by Anthony Carter

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2011

    The theology of the church is filled with big words (justification, sanctification, predestination, and more). These big words carry with them big meanings. These big meanings reveal to us the bigness of our God and the greatness of our salvation. One such word is propitiation. Propitiation is not a word that easily flows from our lips. You probably are not likely to find it the topic of conversation at your next church social. It likely will not cut into the conversation at the barber shop or beauty parlor. Unfortunately, it probably is not the subject of too many Sunday school … View Resource

  • Mercy Triumphs Through Judgment Article by Nicholas Batzig

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2011

    Say therefore to the people of Israel, ‘I am the LORD , and I will bring you out from under the burdens of the Egyptians, and I will deliver you from slavery to them, and I will redeem you with an outstretched arm and with great acts of judgment’” (Ex. 6:6). Jonathan Edwards, in his six-part sermon series “The Wisdom of God Displayed in the Way of Salvation,” made the following astonishing statement: The justice of God that required man’s damnation, and seemed inconsistent with his salvation, now as much requires the salvation of those that believe in Christ, as … View Resource

  • Purchased by His Blood Article by Anthony Carter

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2011

    Purchasing power is the number of goods or services that can be purchased with a unit of currency. When I was a young boy growing up in rural Michigan, currency was scarce. If I was ever fortunate enough to get my hands on a doll ar, I felt I had the world at my disposal. I would run to the local store and experience real purchasing power. In those days, the stores were stocked with penny candy and one could buy a bottle of Coca-Cola for a dime. Those were the days. I recall my mother driving up to the … View Resource

  • Pardoned and Glorified Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2009

    If you’ve read Victor Hugo’s classic work Les Miserables, or if you’ve seen the stage production or film, you’ll recall the scene wherein the bitter criminal Jean Valjean has been released from prison and finds safe harbor at a bishop’s home. Instead of returning the bishop’s kindness, Valjean steals his silver, strikes him, and flees in the night. After Valjean is caught by the arresting officer, who represents the law, he brings Valjean before the bruised bishop to press charges. The bishop, representing God, affirms not only that he knows Valjean but alleges he gave Valjean the silver and … View Resource

  • Boasting in His Shame Article by John Sartelle

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2009 | Galatians 6

    But far be it from me to boast except in the cross of our Lord Jesus Christ” (Gal. 6:14). This was an absurd statement in Paul’s world. The cross was an instrument of execution used by the government. The cross was a place of shame, disgrace, humiliation, indignity, degradation, and ignominy.  The criminal was beaten, undressed, arms spread and nailed to a cross beam, feet nailed to a vertical beam, and hoisted above the ground for the world to see. Spread eagled, naked, helpless…the scene was designed to humiliate.  Who would make that his ultimate boast? From the moment in … View Resource

  • Christ Forsaken Article by Joel Beeke

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2008 | Matthew 27

    Ay, ay, d’ye know what it was—dying on the cross, forsaken by His Father—d’ye know what it was?… It was damnation—and damnation taken lovingly.”      — John “Rabbi” Duncan (1796–1870) “And about the ninth hour Jesus cried with a loud voice, saying, Eli, Eli, lama sabachthani? that is to say, My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me?” (Matt. 27:46, KJV). It is noon, and Jesus has been on the cross for three pain-filled hours. Suddenly, darkness falls on Calvary and “over all the land” (v. 45). By a miraculous act of Almighty God, midday becomes midnight. This … View Resource

  • The Wondrous Cross Article by Keith Mathison

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2008

    I sometimes wonder how many Christians stop to think about how incredibly odd it is that crucifixes are used as works of art. Crucifixes adorn church architecture, classic paintings, sculpture, and even jewelry. But consider for a moment what a crucifix was originally. It was a means of execution. In fact, it was and is one of the most ghastly means of execution ever devised by man. So horrible was it that it was reserved for the lowest of the low: slaves, pirates, and rebels. Roman citizens were exempt. Cultured Romans considered it unworthy of discussion in polite company. Yet today … View Resource

  • The Agonizing Prayer Article by Jerry Bridges

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2008 | Matthew 26

    Isaiah wrote prophetically of Jesus that He was “a man of sorrows, and acquainted with grief” (Isa. 53:3). Though those words were descriptive of His entire life, we see them coming to a climax in the garden of Gethsemane where Jesus prayed, “My Father, if it be possible, let this cup pass from me; nevertheless, not as I will, but as you will” (Matt. 26:39). Luke tells us that Jesus was in such agony as He prayed that “His sweat became like great drops of blood falling down to the ground” (Luke 22:44). What was it that caused Jesus such agony? … View Resource

  • The National Denier: Fiction Stranger than the Truth! Article by S.M. Baugh

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2001

    It is strange, is it not, that perfectly rational, even brilliant people should believe the most untenable of fables but disbelieve the most believable of historical events? No, it is beyond strange: it is downright tragic, because to deny this one historical fact—the resurrection of the Lord Jesus Christ—means to die in pitiful despair (1 Cor. 15:17–19). Yet people through the ages have replaced the simple truth of Christ’s resurrection with fabulous theories of their own. They must do something, because Christ’s resurrection cannot be ignored by anyone calling himself a Christian. An enraged bull in a pasture is merely … View Resource