• Commentaries as a Ministry Article by Douglas Moo

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2013

    I love writing commentaries. I feel as if it is what God made me to do. I have written around twelve of them, ranging from thirty-page overviews to one-thousand-page detailed expositions. I just finished one and will start another in a year or so. I am incredibly thankful that I can spend so much of my time doing what I love. As much as I like writing commentaries, however, I could hardly justify the work I put into them on that basis alone. I write them because I am convinced that, as flawed as they are, they help God’s people … View Resource

  • Consistent Service Article by Kevin Struyk

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2006

    Over the last couple months I’ve been extremely busy. Like most American’s today, I am driving around in my SUV from one appointment to the next; attending church functions, get-togethers with friends and family, all the while tending to my everyday responsibilities at Ligonier Ministries. This amounts to a lot of work. Sometimes all this work is burdensome, and the joy of working for Christ’s kingdom here on earth is nowhere to be found. After reading the second chapter in Genesis, I was struck by the fact that before the fall, the Lord God took Adam and placed him in … View Resource

  • Do Your Duty Article by Gene Edward Veith

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2014 | Luke 17

    Duty is one of those words that used to carry great weight but really doesn’t anymore. It is still an important concept in military circles, but elsewhere doing something because it’s your duty has acquired a negative connotation. “You just say you love me because you think it’s your duty.” “They just go to church out of a sense of duty.” In the nineteenth century, though, calls to duty were inspirational. Just before the sea battle of Trafalgar, Admiral Nelson sent up signal flags that sent this message to the fleet: “England expects that every man will do his duty.” … View Resource

  • The Good Life Article by Trip Lee

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2013

    I am a lover of hip hop. I fell in love with the music form when I was 10, and I’ve never been the same since. As a child and a teenager, when I wasn’t in class or asleep, I was listening to my favorite rappers. I hung on their every word, and they had a lot to say. Most rappers don’t intend to be teachers, but that doesn’t mean I wasn’t learning. I listened closely to their ideas about the good life—and I liked what I heard. With albums in my CD player such as Get Rich or Die … View Resource

  • Honoring Christ Online: An Interview with Tim Challies Article by Tim Challies

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2013

    Tabletalk: How did you become a Christian? Tim Challies: Along with my brother and three sisters, I had the great privilege of growing up in a Christian home. My parents had both come to Christ through Pentecostalism and had married fresh out of college. Their honeymoon took them to Switzerland, where they spent a week at Francis Schaeffer’s L’Abri. It was there that they encountered Reformed theology and a Christian faith that was intellectually fulfilling. I was raised in a home where the gospel was both celebrated and modeled. When I was fourteen or fifteen, I had a crisis … View Resource

  • The Imitation of Christ Article by Scott Seaton

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2005

    My ministry is to teach refugee families to read.” “I lead children’s Sunday school.” “I’m on the missions committee.” “I serve at the clothes closet once a week.” “I really don’t know what my ministry is.” These responses are typical of the answers you may hear when you ask God’s people about how they’re involved in ministry. Then dig a little deeper to find out what prompted them to serve: “I read a verse about caring for people in need.” “I like to teach.” “My spiritual gift is mercy, so I got involved in a mercy ministry.” “I don’t feel … View Resource

  • Integrity in Vocation Article by Greg Miseyko

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2008

    Mr. Reagan is “a firm and unbending politician for whom words and deeds are one and the same.” This assessment found in East German secret police files provides future generations with a lasting example of integrity. These files must have reached the attention of Iranian leaders who released fifty-two American hostages held for fourteen months — on the very day Ronald Reagan assumed the presidency in 1981. His reputation for integrity meant all parties could anticipate a swift and sure response from a man of principle. Those files, recovered after the ransacking of the Stassi headquarters in Berlin, now hang … View Resource

  • Marks of a Great Teacher: Understanding Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | April 1993

    The K-I-S-S principle is frequently requested in a learning environment. The acrostic stands for “Keep it simple, stupid.” It seems we are a people who loathe difficult study. We want easy answers and we want them quickly. Mastery of a subject, however, requires years of diligent labor and study. But once the teacher has mastered his material, how does he transmit it to his students? Certain assumptions are made in the classroom. The first is that the teacher knows more about the subject than the student. It is, in general, a safe assumption. The second assumption is that the teacher … View Resource

  • The Pastor – His Identity and Authority Article by John White

    We have ceased to think theologically about the ministry. Instead, we characterize it almost exclusively in functional or institutional terms. There are at least two reasons for this shift in emphasis. On the one hand there are the new developments in clinical psychology and counseling procedures, and on the other the requests of parishioners, the denominational programs, and the culture of the local community. Much has been written about various aspects of pastoral theology, but there is a remarkable scarcity of literature that explores the theological issues that lie behind it. The doyen of modern pastoral methods, Seward Hiltner, has … View Resource

  • Playing Your Part Article by Gene Edward Veith

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2009

    As seen in other articles this month, the word hypocrisy derives from the Greek term for “playing a part.” The ordinary word for an actor on the stage in Greek drama was hypocrite. In the tragedies of Sophocles or the comedies of Aristophanes, the actors — the hypocrites — played their different parts by wearing masks. The moral transgression of hypocrisy also involves playing a part and wearing a mask. But there are also times when God calls us to play a part. Today’s culture is tolerant of almost every behavior, except hypocrisy. Our society has no problem with … View Resource

  • The Protestant Work Ethic Article by Gene Edward Veith

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2006

    The Protestant work ethic promotes excellence. But what is the connection between Protestantism, work, and excellence? The pioneering sociologist Max Weber was the first to draw attention to the Protestant work ethic. In his book The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism, published in 1904, Weber studied the phenomenal economic growth, social mobility, and cultural change that accompanied the Reformation. He went so far as to credit the Reformation for the rise of capitalism. Usually, he said, religion is otherworldly. But the Reformation doctrine of vocation taught that religion is to be lived out in this world. Weber … View Resource

  • The Rhythm of Life Article by Edward Welch

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2015 | Colossians 3

    Sometimes work seems futile and miserable; sometimes we might not have work; and sometimes we might not want work. In other words, there are times when there is no rhythm to our vocational life but only monotonous and persistent dreariness. We don’t expect that any one answer will reboot us into a more normal rhythm, one in which our cycle includes both rest that is restorative and times of enthusiasm for our work. But we do anticipate being able to unload some of that dreariness. Imagine vocational ennui as an accumulation of unnecessary weights. Work can, indeed, be burdensome. We … View Resource

  • Sloth & Diligence Article by Ken Jones

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2008

    When one thinks of the enduring legacy of the sixteenth-century Protestant Reformation, there are a number of things that come to mind — things like justification by faith alone, in Christ alone, according to God’s Word alone, and for His glory alone. But there is another Reformation landmark that is often overlooked. It has been preserved in the catchphrase “the Protestant work ethic.” This expression has come to be associated with others like “an honest day’s pay for an honest day’s work.” But the reason this is called the Protestant work ethic is because one of the things articulated or … View Resource

  • Turning a New Page: An Interview with Allan Fisher Article by Allan Fisher

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2014

    Tabletalk: How did God call you to the vocation of book editing and publishing? Allan Fisher: God called me to Christian publishing in a variety of ways, only a few of which I will mention here. Through an excellent fourth-grade teacher, I first became a serious reader. During ninth grade I became confident of my God-given academic abilities. Through my new stepfather the following year, I was introduced to an extensive personal library and taken to bookstores, new and used. During my senior year of high school I came to Christ and became a student of the Bible. A … View Resource