• What We’ve Received Article by Keith Mathison

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2015

    The Westminster Confession of Faith contains a majestic statement on the authority of Scripture: The authority of the holy Scripture, for which it ought to bebelieved and obeyed, dependeth not upon the testimony of any man, or church; but wholly upon God (who is truth itself) the author thereof: and therefore it is to be received because it is the Word of God. We may be moved and induced by the testimony of the church to a high and reverent esteem of the holy Scripture. And the heavenliness of the matter, the efficacy of the doctrine, the majesty of the … View Resource

  • Why It’s Essential Article by Michael Kruger

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2015

    Inerrancy is not a popular term in the world of biblical studies today. For many, it is viewed as an anti-intellectual, fear-motivated invention of nineteenth-and twentieth-century American fundamentalists who were tryingto protect the Bible’s authority from the rising tide of Enlightenment rationalism. A.E. Harvey, in his recent book Is Scripture Still Holy? captures the modern academic sentiment quite well: “Inerrancy…is both theologically and philosophically indefensible and rightly rejected by the majority voice of a generation which has, in this respect, genuinely ‘come of age.’” Unfortunately, these sorts of criticisms are all too common. Inerrancy is portrayed as out of date, … View Resource

  • Every Jot and Tittle Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2014

    Although we don’t like to admit it, the reason many of us don’t read the Bible regularly is because we are afraid of it. We are afraid of the Bible because we are ignorant of the Bible. Many of the theological words and concepts we come across in the Bible are foreign to us and, therefore, frighten us. When we come across such words, we often don’t know what to make of them. View Resource

  • Grammatical Fallacies Article by Douglas Moo

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2014

    God’s Word comes to us in words. These words are human words: chosen by particular human beings in particular circumstances to communicate a particular message. Of course, the words of Scripture are also divine words. Each one of them is “breathed out” by God (2 Tim. 3:16). However, while the inspired quality of the words of Scripture means that they are utterly reliable and fully authoritative, it does not cancel the genuine human quality of those words. As orthodox interpreters have long recognized, then, the words of Scripture function in many basic ways just like any words function. Understanding the … View Resource

  • From Eden to the New Jerusalem: An Interview with T.D. Alexander Article by T. Desmond Alexander

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2012

    Tabletalk: Describe how you became a Christian and how God called you to work in the academy. T.D. Alexander: I grew up in a rural community in the northeast of Ireland, strongly influenced by Ulster-Scots culture, where almost everyone was Presbyterian by birth. As the eldest of three boys, I was cared for sacrificially by our mother following our father’s early death. In my mid-teens, I made that wonderful discovery of the grace of God, understanding personally the significance of what Christ did for me on the cross. Thereafter, filled with a desire to serve Christ, I explored the … View Resource

  • Last Things First Article by Keith Mathison

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2011

    Do you ever have difficulty understanding how Scripture fits together as a coherent whole? I have a suggestion. The next time you read through the Bible, s t a r t wit h Revelation 20–22, and then go back to Genesis 1. Just as knowing the conclusion of a whodunit helps you see things you missed, the final chapters of Revelation can help you identify the major themes of Scripture that are introduced in Genesis and developed throughout the entire Bible. In Genesis, we learn that God intends to establish His kingdom on earth with man as a subordinate king … View Resource

  • United in the (whole) Truth Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2011 | 1 Corinthians 1

    We are prone to partiality. It is our habit not only to have preferences but to establish ourselves and pride ourselves in the preferences we choose. We play favorites and then rally around our favorites as we strive to demonstrate why our favorites should be everyone’s favorites. Being partial, having preferences, and playing favorites isn’t inherently wrong, so long as our partiality, preferences, and favorites are in accord with sacred Scripture. Problems quickly emerge, however, when we begin to play favorites with Scripture itself. View Resource

  • Unquestionable Authority Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2009

    I am terribly vexed. I have just finished reading an article from the notoriously left-wing magazine Newsweek. In the cover story, “The Religious Case for Gay Marriage,” author Lisa Miller argues the case for gay “marriage” using the Bible as her authority. Miller opens with this line: “Let’s try for a minute to take the religious conservatives at their word and define marriage as the Bible does.” She later asserts, “The Bible gives us no good reason to oppose gay marriage.”  It takes no brains but a lot of guts to try to make a case for gay “marriage” (of … View Resource

  • The Final Word Article by Keith Mathison

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2009

    In the early part of the twentieth century, one would have been hard pressed to find a greater theological mind than that of Benjamin B. Warfield (1851–1921). Sadly, both he and his work are virtually unknown today outside of certain circles in the Reformed churches. During his lifetime, however, his scholarship was world-renowned. Although a great theologian, Warfield never wrote a complete systematic theology text. He did, however, write extensively on a wide range of topics, at both the popular and academic levels. His collected works fill ten volumes, and his breadth and depth of knowledge remain something to behold. … View Resource

  • The Bible in English Article by Stephen Nichols

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2008

    Many of us are spoiled. We likely live in proximity to a bookstore, or if not, then we are just a mouse click away from an online source of books that would put at our disposal any number of English Bible translations in any type of bindings and in all shapes, sizes, and colors. This embarrassment of riches, however, hasn’t always been the case. For centuries, written copies of the Bible in English, Old English that is, simply didn’t exist. Copies were extremely expensive and not so commonly distributed. The expansive English Bible selection we enjoy today is the end product … View Resource

  • The New Covenant Scriptures Article by C.E. Hill

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2008

    In April of 2006, amid much media fanfare and not a little scholarly giddiness, The National Geo-graphic Society unveiled to the world a long-lost Gnostic gospel, The Gospel of Judas. “This is big. A lot of people are going to be upset,” one scholar excitedly predicted. “This changes the history of early Christianity,” pronounced another (Andrew Cockburn, “The Judas Gospel,” National Geographic, May 2006, p. 91). Now, two years later, about all that has changed regarding early Christianity are the bank accounts of those historians who have written books on the gospel of Judas. Already the new-yet-old gospel is … View Resource

  • Moses Article by Robert Vasholz

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2008

    Generally speaking, the mention of canon or “canonicity” of the Bible is considered a topic for seminary professors and specialists in theology. It appears to have small relevance to “faith and practice.” But when one realizes that canonicity deals with such fundamental questions like “how did God’s people know what belonged in the Bible?” and “how can we be sure we still have what the inspired writers wrote?” it becomes clear that one’s views on canonicity are vitally linked to the integrity of Scripture.  An ongoing attack by biblical critics on the trustworthiness of the Bible has decidedly focused on … View Resource

  • Tota Scriptura Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2008

    In centuries past, the church was faced with the important task of recognizing which books belong in the Bible. The Bible itself is not a single book but a collection of many individual books. What the church sought to establish was what we call the canon of sacred Scripture. The word canon comes from a Greek word that means “standard or measuring rod.” So the canon of sacred Scripture delineates the standard that the church used in receiving the Word of God. As is often the case, it is the work of heretics that forces the church to define her … View Resource

  • Higher Criticism Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2008

    About ten years ago I had the opportunity to study under the late Dr. Harold O. J. Brown (1933–2007) at the Evangelical Preacher’s Seminary in Wittenberg, Germany. Dr. Brown was known by his students for his oral examinations, wherein he generously and humorously interrogated us on a variety of doctrinal questions that we were expected to answer on the spot. During one of his oral examinations I recall one of my fellow students speaking somewhat flippantly about the Bible. Without hesitation, looking intently at the student, Dr. Brown said, “The Bible is not just some book. It is the Word … View Resource

  • Sola Scriptura Article by Robert Rothwell

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2005

    A few months ago, a friend and I shared with each other our favorite passages of Scripture. Without hesitation, I included Revelation 21 in my list because of its promise of new heavens and a new earth. The book of Ruth and its picture of redemption has also been a source of much comfort in my life. Because of our different personalities and life experiences, I think it is somewhat inevitable that we will all identify with a particular passage or character from the Bible more than other ones. In His wise providence, God has given us a collection of … View Resource