• Freed by the Blood Article by Anthony Carter

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2011

    Frankly speaking, sin not only contaminates, it also subjugates. It enslaves. Like a great snake — a python or anaconda — sin wraps itself around us and slowly entangles and strangles us. Like the hunter’s net, the more we struggle against it in our strength, the more we find ourselves entangled in it. It beats us into submission and causes our servitude to be hard and inextricable. It is an enslaver of the worst kind. It is no respecter of persons. The young and old, the rich and poor alike are all under its sway. Sin has a power unparalleled … View Resource

  • Redeemed by His Blood Article by Anthony Carter

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2011

    Cecil B. Demille’s The Ten Commandments (1956) is one of the most successful movies ever made. At the time, it was a grand cinematic achievement. Its cinematography and special effects wowed the movie world. Everyone marveled, not only at the presentation, but also at the story itself. The story indeed isa grand one, as it recapitulates the storyline of the entire drama of redemption. The deliverance of the children of Israel from slavery in Egypt is an unforgettable story of God’s purposeful and powerful salvation of His people. The account of God redeeming Israel from Egypt foreshadowed the redemption to … View Resource

  • The Real Danger Article by D. Martyn Lloyd-Jones

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2007

    The Gospel makes us see…our real danger. These are the problems — not the Esaus we put up. These are the problems — my relationship to God, my relationship to myself, yes, and my real danger. Now to Jacob of course the danger was this, that Esau might rob him of a certain amount of his goods, or that Esau might kill his wives and children, or indeed that Esau might go so far as to take the life of Jacob — that to Jacob was the danger. As we look and watch him as he paces … View Resource

  • A Father’s Love Article by John Sartelle

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2005

    On March 19, 1969, my life and my understanding of the Gospel changed forever. That was not the day that I became a Christian. I did not attend church that day, nor did I hear a sermon. That was the day our first child was born. After a long and traumatic labor, Janet gave birth to our daughter. Her name was already chosen — Jill. I was not prepared for the immensity of love and care that overwhelmed me as I held her those first few times, as I fed her, as I stood over her bed and just stared. … View Resource

  • Transformed in Glory Article by Robert Rothwell

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2004

    About two years ago I bought my first new car. Actually, to say it was a new car would be a bit misleading. It was three years old at the time and had 40,000 miles on it. Still, considering the fact that I had been driving hand-me down vehicles for many years prior to my purchase, the car was new to me, and I still enjoy driving it everywhere. However, during spring evenings I find myself less enthusiastic about driving the car. This has nothing to do with my car, it is actually related to the physical environment here in … View Resource

  • United in Truth Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2004

    During the second half of the twentieth century, post-Christian societies throughout the world began to shout the mantra “unity is god!” In attempting to liberate themselves from the truths upon which they were established, they bound themselves to a law that requires perfect compliance. Consequently, it has become necessary for every post-Christian society to promulgate its cause in accordance with this one code: “In unity we trust, in tolerance we flourish, and in pluralism we are free. Unity is god, and there is no god but unity.” It is the destiny of human societies to self-destruct, and it is the … View Resource

  • Apostasy and How it Happens Article by Sinclair Ferguson

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2004

    I can still recall the conversation although it took place more than three decades ago. A shocked friend asked, “Have you heard that Sarah is no longer a Christian?” What was so alarming to my friend was that Sarah had been one of the most influential, and apparently fruitful, members of her Inter-Varsity group. What would those who had been influenced by her witness to Christ say, or do? Would they be shaken to the core and now doubt their own Christian faith? After all, the person who had pointed them to Christ no longer trusted Him. On occasion we … View Resource

  • God’s Rest for God’s People Article by Douglas Kelly

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2004

    How accurately Saint Augustine expressed the usually unexpressed, but deepest desire of every human heart: “Lord, thou hast made us for thyself, and our hearts are restless until they find their rest in Thee” (Confessions, Book 1). The restless heart of Israel is divinely chosen by God to represent with fullest accuracy the dissatisfied, seeking heart of all humanity. In the story of Israel, you and I, by grace, will find ourselves (as we really are, not as we may pretend to be). Chapters 3 and 4 of the epistle to the Hebrews survey much of the history … View Resource

  • Salvation, Past, Present, and Future Article by Sinclair Ferguson

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2004

    Time past and time present are both together in time future,” wrote T.S. Elliot. His rhythmic words simply and eloquently describe the ordinary flow of history. But the letter to the Hebrews presents a very different perspective on God’s purposes and patterns in the flow of history. There, it would be true to say, the future determines the past and the present, rather than the other way round. To understand Hebrews — and thus to understand how the Bible as a whole works — we need to understand this riddle: The invisible is more substantial than the visible. The future … View Resource

  • The Only Redeemer Article by Douglas Kelly

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2004

    The heart of Hebrews chapter 2 is conveyed to us by an unsophisticated, and yet very profound old Gospel hymn: “No angel could his place have taken; High of all the High though he; The Loved One on the cross forsaken, Was One of the Godhead Three!” What powerful, beautiful and majestic creatures are the holy angels! How invisibly and tenderly they help us needy believers to get through life in a dangerous world (cf. Heb. 1:14). C. S. Lewis was probably right when he suggested that if we could see an angel in his full glory (or even the … View Resource