• The Right Balance Article by Scott Redd

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2015 | Genesis 2

    One of the first things we learn about work is that we are to regularly stop doing it (Gen. 2:1-3). The creation account of Genesis 1 culminates in the Lord’s setting aside His creative labors in order to rest. That divine rest becomes a model for those made in the image of this working-and-resting God, which means that all humanity is likewise called to regularly rest from daily labor (Ex. 20:8-11; Deut. 5:12-15). Human rest is first presented to us as God’s rest. He completes His creative work, sits back, looks at it, declares that … View Resource

  • A Well-Spent Sabbath Article by David Strain

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2015 | Genesis 2

    For a few people today, an hour or two on Sunday mornings is occupied with public worship, but for most people, the idea that Sunday is the Christian Sabbath—an entire day set apart for worship, rest, and ministry—is entirely novel. And yet, in an age of frenetic and unrelenting busyness, when technology allows us to stay plugged in to the world twenty-four-seven, when entertainment becomes the de facto purpose of so many lives, nothing could be more countercultural, nor bear more eloquent testimony to a Christian’s citizenship in another world, than a well-spent Lord’s Day. Growing up in … View Resource

  • The Perpetuity and Change of the Sabbath Article by James Dennison Jr.

    The title of this essay is borrowed from a sermon bearing the heading by the esteemed American Puritan, Jonathan Edwards (1703-58).1 We borrow the title as a tribute to the scholar, teacher, and friend for whom this essay is written: first, because he has loved Edwards; second, because he too has loved the Sabbath Edwards loved. The phenomenon of Puritanism has been aptly described as the history of an ideal. 2 An ideal hatched in the cell of a German monk, nurtured in a Swiss burg, and turned loose on an establishment directed by Elizabeth Regina. Puritanism’s basic … View Resource

  • The Seventh-day Sabbath Article by Skip MacCarty

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2011

    Rightly understood and observed, the seventh-day Sabbath (Saturday) is a precious gift from God. Millions of Christians in my faith community experience it as such. At creation, “God blessed the seventh day and made it holy” (Gen. 2:3; italics supplied); the Sabbath commandment echoes, “The Lord blessed the Sabbath day and made it holy” (Ex. 20:11). The Sabbath is also God’s chosen sign of creation and redemption: “that you may know that I, the Lord, sanctify you” (Ex. 31:13); thus, rightly understood and observed, the Sabbath remains a perpetual antidote to both the theory of … View Resource

  • Defining the Debate Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2011

    The question of Sabbath observation, historically, has provoked many debates and controversies involving separate issues. The first great debate about the Sabbath is whether, as an Old Testament ordinance particularly emphasized in the Mosaic covenant, it is still obligatory in the context of new covenant Christianity. Augustine, for example, believed that nine of the Ten Commandments (the so-called “moral law” of the Old Testament) were still intact and imposed obligations upon the Christian church. His lone exception with the commandment with respect to the Sabbath day. Since Paul spoke about keeping Sabbaths or not keeping Sabbaths as a matter adiaphorous … View Resource

  • Keeping the Lord’s Day Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2011

    In the summer of 1999, I was studying the Lutheran Reformation in eastern Germany with a group of fellow American graduate students. After attending a Sunday morning worship service at the Stadtkirche in Wittenberg, where Martin Luther often preached, we made our way south to Halle, the birthplace of G. F. Handel and seventeenth-century German pietism. Just ten years after the fall of the Berlin Wall, eastern Germany was at the height of its revitalization efforts, the Deutsche Mark was still the currency, and on Sundays most of the small-town shops and restaurants were closed in observance of the Lord … View Resource

  • Sabbath Rest Article by Sinclair Ferguson

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2004

    The anonymous author of Hebrews found different ways of describing the superiority of the Lord Jesus Christ. One of them, which forms the underlying motif of chapters 3 and 4, is that Jesus Christ gives the rest that neither Moses nor Joshua could provide. Under Moses, the people of God were disobedient and failed to enter into God’s rest (3:18). Psalm 95:11 (quoted in Hebrews 4:3) implies that Joshua could not have given the people “real rest” since “through David” God speaks about the rest he will give on another day (Heb. 4:7). This in … View Resource