• Home to Glory Article by John Sartelle

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2009

    He was manifested in the flesh, vindicated by the Spirit, seen by angels, proclaimed among the nations, believed on in the world, taken up in glory” (1 Tim. 3:16). If you had been a follower of Christ in first-century Ephesus, you would have probably recited or sung those words. Those six phrases were recorded poetically by Paul as either a confession often repeated by Christians or as part of a hymn of praise sung about Jesus. There is not enough space in this brief article to mine the gold found in each of those phrases. So we will focus just on … View Resource

  • He is Not Here, He is Risen Article by Chris Donato

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2005

    Many Christians seem content to leave Jesus on the cross, while the resurrection often suffers from neglect. That the cross receives so much attention, however, is not without warrant. After all, the event was the “one act of righteousness” that led “to justification and life for all men” (Rom. 5:18). That is to say, the one Man’s act of righteousness is the climactic act of Jesus’ life-long fidelity to His Father’s will and purpose, when He offered up His life for His people. Taking it one-step further, many of us are inclined to say that we will live under the … View Resource

  • The Cross and the Crown Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2005

    Several years ago I heard about a large suburban church that rented a fifteen-thousand seat performance hall and invited a well-known college football coach to give his testimony about being a Christian coach. When I heard about this, what concerned me was not the fact that a college football coach was asked to give his testimony but that this event replaced the church’s Easter worship service. Instead of dedicating their worship service to the celebration of the resurrection of Jesus Christ (as we are called to do each Lord’s Day), this church decided it could serve the interests of God’s … View Resource

  • Acquainted with Death Article by Peter Leithart

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2001

    Many today boast of near-death experiences. I do not. I have never had a near-death experience. But I am not intimidated by those who have, because I can boast, too. I have never been near death, but I have died many times. Before I was born, I was living in a warm and cozy, if somewhat damp, environment, minding my business and sucking my thumb. Birth was a death for me, a death to the womb, a death to protection and security, a death to a life of blissful and careless dependency. I cried when I was born, not because … View Resource

  • Christ is Risen: So What? Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2001

    We live amid a culture that revels in its efficiency. Thus, to a large degree, evangelicalism has grown apathetic to its own message, the message of the Resurrection. This predicament is often demonstrated in Gospel presentations that more or less leave Jesus on the cross. This cannot be the predicament for those who proclaim Jesus as the risen and reigning Christ of the world. Michael Green’s book Christ is Risen: So What? addresses the predominant evangelical attitude of indifference toward the fundamental doctrine of the Resurrection. The title question is quite brash. Still, it is a question we ought to … View Resource

  • Raised Incorruptible Article by Jim Martin

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2001

    In November 1990, workers cutting a new road in Jerusalem’s southern suburbs unintentionally intruded into a first-century family burial chamber. One of the ornately carved ossuaries contained the skeletal remains of six individuals: two infants, a young child under age 5, a boy in his early teens, an adult woman, and a 60- year-old male. The name “Yehoseph bar Qafa,” which was inscribed on that ossuary, suggested the burial chamber belonged to none other than the High Priest Caiaphas, who brought Jesus before Pilate. Caiaphas claimed both his priestly authority as the high priest and his judicial authority as the … View Resource

  • The End of Death Article by Daniel Doriani

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2000

    SIGNIFICANT EVENTS HAVE PHASES. IN SPORTS, athletes first build skill and endurance, then they play the game, and finally interpret the results, celebrating victory or learning from defeat. Banquets also have phases. After we savor the meal itself, we linger over coffee and dessert in conversation that appropriates the meal as an emblem of a life shared with friends. So, too, we must interpret and appropriate a most significant event, the death of death in the death and resurrection of Christ. The Crowds Misunderstood It The perpetrators and witnesses of Jesus’ death tried, unsuccessfully, to interpret its significance before the … View Resource

  • “If I Should Die Before I Wake …” Article by Harold Brown

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2000

    WHAT HAPPENS TO US AT DEATH? We know what happens to the body, but what happens to the soul? The materialist’s answer is simple: There is no such thing as a soul, so there is no hope of eternal life and no need to fear anything worse than extinction. By contrast, the Hindu or his New Age imitator deems the soul to be real, independent of the body, and says that after death the soul will migrate to a new body and be reincarnated for another revolution of the wheel of existence. But this view also is not a hope, … View Resource