• Mercy Amidst Judgment Devotional

    Jeremiah 4:5–31

    God swore by Himself to bless the world through Abraham (Gen. 12:1–3; 15), imposing a self-obligation to save humanity that He cannot violate lest He be unfaithful to His covenant oath. In saving the world from sin, however, the Lord does not have to save every person. We know that He has sovereignly chosen to pass over some for salvation, and these show themselves by their failure to repent. But if we repent, we are part of the remnant whom the Lord saves by grace alone through faith alone. View Resource

  • God’s Charge Against Judah Devotional

    Jeremiah 3:1–5

    John Calvin comments on today’s passage, “When an adulteress finds her husband so willing of himself, and ready to grant free pardon, it is certainly an example not found among mortals.” Adultery harms, often irreparably, the bond between husband and wife on an earthly level. Thus, Christ permits divorce for sexual infidelity (Matt. 19:9). However, no sin destroys permanently the bond between God and His people, provided that we are repentant. That is the magnitude of His grace. View Resource

  • The Lord Watches over His Word Devotional

    Jeremiah 1:11–19

    God said to Jeremiah, “They shall not prevail against you, for I am with you, declares the Lord, to deliver you” (Jer. 1:19). This promise was not just for Jeremiah, but it is for all the faithful servants of God. The enemies of the Lord can do their best, but the gates of hell will not prevail against His church (Matt. 16:18). Even if we die as a result of faithfulness to the gospel, we will be vindicated at the last day, and God will save all of His elect by His Word. The Lord will indeed deliver all His … View Resource

  • Jeremiah the Weeping Prophet Devotional

    Jeremiah 1:1–8

    Jeremiah 1:1–8 has much to say to us theologically. First, that God formed Jeremiah in the womb affirms that human beings are made in the Lord’s image from the earliest stages of development and worthy of protection from conception onward. Jeremiah’s call also helps establish our doctrine of vocation. If the prophet’s calling was established before he was born, surely it is not a stretch to assume that our sovereign Lord has established a calling for all of His people before their births. View Resource

  • Joel and the Locust Invasion Devotional

    Joel 1

    The Lord is not presently speaking in such a way as to tell us the reasons for every disaster; thus, we cannot with certainty identify any natural disaster today as His direct judgment on sin. Yet Scripture says natural disasters anticipate the day of the Lord to come, so they give us an opportunity to reflect on judgment day, reminding us that we must preach the gospel to people who, if they remain impenitent, will suffer far more on that day than they can in any present disaster. View Resource

  • Micah’s Trust in the Lord Devotional

    Micah 7:1–10

    As God’s people were surrounded by their enemies, Israel and Judah often heard these nations asking, “Where is the LORD your God?” (Mic. 7:10a). Because these enemies conquered Canaan with little resistance, they thought Yahweh was absent from His people. But Micah saw that the faithful remnant would one day look on these enemies after the Lord trampled them underfoot (v. 10b). That is our hope, for at the last day Christ will set His people over their foes (2 Tim. 2:11–12a). View Resource

  • The Ruler from Bethlehem Devotional

    Micah 5:1–5

    The scribes in Matthew 2:1–6 answer Herod with an interpretive gloss that says Bethlehem is not the least of the clans of Judah because of the Messiah. Though many of them would reject Jesus, this interpretive reading implicitly recognizes the truth that humble Bethlehem’s status would be changed forever because of the Messiah’s birth there. In turn, the Messiah’s origin in Bethlehem shows us that God exalts the humble and humbles those who exalt themselves. View Resource

  • The Heavenly Mount Zion Devotional

    Revelation 21

    We must always read the Old Testament in light of the new covenant revelation in Christ Jesus, the final Word of God to His people (Heb. 1:1–4). The nations have begun to go up to the temple of the Lord in going to Christ, God’s true temple (John 2:18–22), and this will be consummated when the heavenly Jerusalem descends to earth. Then, all of the redeemed will fulfill the purpose for which God made us as we worship Him forever. View Resource

  • The Exaltation of God’s Mountain Devotional

    Micah 4:1–5

    The world will worship Yahweh, the one true Lord of all. That is the conclusion of the Bible in many places, including today’s passage. Thus, we must eagerly pray for this day to arrive, and we must never think that any race, nation, or individual is so far gone as to be irredeemable. Death alone marks the point at which salvation is no longer possible. May we long for the conversion of the nations to Christ, and work to that end with our time, talents, and treasures. View Resource

  • Hearing What we Want to Hear Devotional

    Micah 2

    Leaders continue to take advantage of the nations they are supposed to serve, using the legal system to their advantage at the expense of the powerless. In the United States, we see this all the time when unscrupulous businessmen lobby for regulations intended purely to drive their smaller competitors out of business and when eminent domain is invoked to force people out of property their families have owned for generations. Let us not be a party to such things. View Resource

  • The Word of the Lord through Micah Devotional

    Micah 1

    Scripture is clear that all sin begins with false worship (Rom. 1:18–32). Therefore, recognizing the idols and false worship behind our other sins advances our sanctification. At root, all sin manifests a desire to get what we want apart from the God who is, leading us to create all manner of idols that promise but can never satisfy. Moreover, those who persist in impenitent idolatry will feel the Lord’s wrath. Let us reject all idols and pursue ultimate satisfaction in Christ alone. View Resource

  • The Worship of All Flesh Devotional

    Isaiah 66:15–24

    Isaiah also conveys the glorious blessing of the new heavens and earth in today’s passage when he says “some of them also I will take for priests” (Isa. 66:21). He is referring to the Gentiles, and this would have been incredible for the original audience to hear. Most Jews could not be priests, but the fact that God would make some Gentiles priests points to the equality of Jew and Gentile under the new covenant. In Christ, we are all priests to the Most High God. View Resource

  • The New Heavens and Earth Devotional

    Isaiah 65:17–20

    If we were asked to give a simple one-sentence summary of Christian eschatology, this would certainly suffice: God is going to make all things right. That includes even the physical world. The Lord will fully transform all things, renewing them so that there will be no cause for pain, mourning, or anything else that we dread so much. This is the hope that lies before us, and knowing that all will be set right in the future helps us endure pain in the present. View Resource

  • The Salvation of the World Devotional

    Isaiah 45:14–25

    Those of us from Gentile backgrounds who serve Christ probably do not consider this fact often enough: We are fulfillments of God’s promises to His people. The Lord promised that the nations would serve Him, and as men and women from all nations are converted, this promise is kept. Of course, this is not due to anything in us, for it is all by God’s grace. Still, it is an immense privilege to be a fulfillment of God’s promise, and we should never tire of thanking Him for that. View Resource

  • The Savior of God’s Blind Servant Devotional

    Isaiah 42:18–43:7

    Today’s passage reveals divine election, for Isaiah speaks of a people who are precious in God’s eyes (43:4). This is not due to any good in them, given that the people are still blind to their sin (42:18–25). Instead, the Lord, for His own good pleasure, chooses to restore a lost people. This restoration of Israel is happening in Jesus Christ, and we who believe in Him have been chosen by God not because of any goodness in us but because the Lord has graciously willed to love us. View Resource