• Finding Contentment Through Boasting Article by Tyler Kenney

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2017

    It is a sad condition of our fallen hearts that when we see God’s goodness to others, so often instead of rejoicing with them and praising God, we become envious, antagonistic to their happiness, and discontent with our own situation. Instead of celebrating and blessing God for the good things He has given them—a happy marriage, children, natural abilities and talents, financial or ministry success—we feel threatened, excluded, or neglected. This sinful response is common to all people, but it is a struggle for Christians because we know our hearts should not respond this way. We know that God has … View Resource

  • Take Heed Article by Nicholas Batzig

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2011

    Bernard of Clairvaux once mentioned an old man who, upon hearing about any professing Christian who fell into sin, would say to himself: “He fell today; I may fall tomorrow.” The apostle Paul commended the same mindset when he wrote, “let anyone who thinks that he stands take heed lest he fall” (1 Cor. 10:12). There is great wisdom in not trusting our own ability to stand. When I was a boy, my father would often say, “The person I trust least of all is myself.” It should shock us to hear a professing Christian say, “I would never do … View Resource

  • Cynicism Article by John Sartelle

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2011

    Dear Shadow Guide, The enemy may now lay claim to your quarry, but he is still of great value to our cause. Our adversary, whom he now calls Lord, is not a realist. Idealism is the weakness of His kingdom. This specific prey of yours has a proclivity toward our utilitarian skepticism. Shadow Guide, you are a proven specialist in manipulating the antagonist’s illegitimates to mistrust consistently His care and pledges. Do what you do best — lead him into the enlightened suspicion of the shadows. A beautiful cynicism usually overtakes all of our own who are forced to live … View Resource

  • Idolizing Theology Article by Mark Ross

    Dearest Valefar, Your recent report has been received, and we do note your concern that things might have taken a turn for the worse. Perhaps they have, but we would not worry too much that your target has developed an almost insatiable thirst for theology. We do not say this can be ignored, but at the same time, we would caution you against any panic. If properly managed, you may find that this actually works to our advantage, not the enemy’s. The battle for a man’s soul can be fought in many ways. Head on, forceful confrontation by tempting him … View Resource

  • Self-Centered Sermons Article by Sean Michael Lucas

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2011

    Our Son in the Unfaith, We see that you are making progress with your charge. We applaud you for that. The enemy has enough minions preaching His infernal Word faithfully; to see this one begin to totter and swerve from his task causes me great and unholy happiness. Might we suggest another avenue by which you might neutralize his effectiveness and so undo his ministry? Begin to work ever so subtly that he would become the focus of the sermon instead of God’s wretched Son. That sounds like a difficult task, we know. Believe us, our general-in-unbelief struggled to get … View Resource

  • It’s All About Me Article by Chris Larson

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2010

    Pride is the worst viper in the heart… . It lies lowest of all in the foundation of the whole building of sin. Of all lusts, it is the most secret, deceitful, and unsearchable in its ways of working. It is ready to mix with everything. Nothing is so hateful to God, contrary to the spirit of the Gospel, or of so dangerous consequence. There’s not one sin that does so much to let the devil into the hearts of the saints and expose them to his delusions.” That is how Jonathan Edwards describes humility’s antithesis — pride. … View Resource

  • Put Off and Put On Article by Jerry Bridges

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2008

    One of the principles of Christian growth is called the “put off and put on” principle (see Eph. 4:22–24). Behind the principle lies the fact that there are always sinful attitudes and actions we need to put off, and there are always positive traits of righteousness we need to put on more firmly.  Jesus uses this principle in Matthew 6, where the words “do not” or equivalent expressions occur ten times. With this expression, He is, of course, emphasizing the “put off.” But He doesn’t just leave us with the “do nots.” He also addresses the proper attitudes and actions to … View Resource