• Jesus and His Apostles: Teaching in Harmony Article by R. Fowler White

    Have you ever gotten the impression that the teaching of the apostles is at odds with the teaching of Jesus?  Sometimes it may seem that way, especially when we see Jesus emphasizing certain things that the apostles don’t, and vice versa.  Though we may be confident that, in the end, their teaching is harmonious, we do get special enjoyment when we see examples of doctrinal harmony between Jesus and His apostles.   I had just such an experience recently as I was listening to Dr. Sproul preach on Matthew 23 and Jesus’ lament over the spiritual state of … View Resource

  • The Witness of John Article by Robert Cara

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2009

    I have just again read through the gospel of John. Yes, it is an amazing book at many levels. At the level of literature, it is enjoyable to read. The vocabulary is fairly simple, but the repeated use of similar expressions is profound (for example, the “I am” statements). Although there are not many explicit Old Testament quotations, John is full of Old Testament themes and allusions (such as “shepherd,” “bread,” “lifted-up serpent”). There are many examples of irony (for instance, the blind man “sees” Jesus, but those who “see” cannot, John 9; Caiaphas’ prediction about Jesus’ death was … View Resource

  • The Witness of Luke Article by Robert Rothwell

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2009

    Imagine for a moment that you are a citizen of the Roman Empire during the first century. You are living at a time of peace and prosperity under the reign of the caesar, whom many call “lord.” Most of your life you have admired Jewish ethics, even though you reject practices like circumcision. Perhaps you have even become a God-fearer, a Gentile who embraces Jewish monotheism without adopting the ceremonial regulations of the Mosaic law. Now imagine that you have just heard the gospel of salvation from a man named Paul. This apostle has told you that lordship belongs … View Resource

  • The Witness of Mark Article by S.M. Baugh

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2009

    Matthew contains 97 percent of Mark’s verses. Why, then, do we have Mark, since we could just read Matthew? Two competing theories reply that either Mark was written as a digest of the larger Matthew or that Matthew was written later as an expansion of Mark. Regardless of possible gospel origins, we should not fail to appreciate that Mark has its own value in the New Testament canon apart from comparison with the other gospels. Mark is a brilliant, lively, exciting presentation of Jesus as the Messiah who marched inevitably to the cross where He was determined to give Himself … View Resource

  • The Witness of Matthew Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2009

    In the history of biblical studies, we have seen in the last two centuries the rise of so-called “higher criticism.” So much of higher criticism is fueled by skepticism with respect to the reliability of the biblical texts. Since orthodox Christians stand opposed to many of the arguments of higher critics, they sometimes overlook valuable insights that can be gained through critical analysis of the text. Some of these analysescan be very helpful to our endeavor of seeking an accurate understanding of the Bible.  One element of critical scholarship that can do this is that dimension known as source … View Resource

  • The Unchanging Gospel Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2009

    I am a Christian, and I am a Protestant. I am a Christian because I trust Jesus Christ alone, believing that salvation is accomplished by grace alone through faith alone because of Christ alone. I am a devout Protestant because I continue to protest against anyone who even suggests that salvation is accomplished in any other way.  When I entered Rome for the first time not too long ago, I was naturally looking forward to visiting St. Peter’s Basilica within the towering walls of Vatican City. As I stood under the world’s tallest dome, I was simply in awe of … View Resource

  • The Gospel of Reality Article by Gene Edward Veith

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2009

    Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John are not enough for many denizens of the twenty-first century. In their search for a more palatable Jesus, novelists such as Dan Brown of The Da Vinci Code, feminist theologians such as Elaine Pagels, and their acolytes in the media and pop culture are turning to the apocryphal gospels of the early heretics. These are alleged to contain a valid, alternative version of early Christianity, one that can support today’s feminism and moral permissiveness. But comparing the New Testament Gospels to those written centuries later only confirms that these writings are works of history. Do … View Resource

  • The Gospel of the Gospels Article by Daniel Hyde

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2009

    Quick. What are the Gospels? Time is up. Did you answer: “The Gospels are the biographies of Jesus Christ?” When we read the Gospels as biographies only, we basically look at them like trees apart from the proverbial forest. There is a better way to read and hear them. The Gospels are biography, but they are theological interpretations of the life of Jesus Christ with the purpose of proclaiming the coming of the king of Israel and the inauguration of His kingdom over all the earth. When read this way, we are enabled to read the gospel in the … View Resource

  • Jesus’ Family Tree Article by Joel Beeke

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2008 | Matthew 1

    Genealogies are hardly spellbinding. Perhaps, like me, you are tempted to skip them in your Bible reading. Yet genealogies are a significant part of God’s infallible Scriptures. They, too, are “profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness” (2 Tim. 3:16 kjv and hereafter). Matthew’s genealogy is a family tree of Jesus Christ, the only-begotten Son of God incarnated as the Son of Man. Matthew wrote his gospel primarily to the Jews. Strictly speaking, the purpose of this genealogy is to prove to Jewish readers that Jesus of Nazareth as the seed of Abraham … View Resource