• Abundant Love Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2004

    Love of Complacency In his monumental biography of Jonathan Edwards, George Marsden cites a passage from Edwards’ Personal Narrative: “Since I came to this town [Northampton], I have often had sweet complacency in God in views of his glorious perfections, and the excellency of Jesus Christ. God has appeared to me, a glorious and lovely being chiefly on account of his holiness. The holiness of God has always appeared to me the most lovely of all his attributes” (p. 112). If we take note of Edwards’ language, his choice of words to describe his enraptured delight in the glory … View Resource

  • Adopted Sons and Daughters Article by Kim Riddlebarger

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2009

    Q. Why did Christ command us to address God thus: “Our Father?” A. To awaken in us at the very beginning of our prayer that childlike reverence for and trust in God, which are to be the ground of our prayer, namely, that God has become our Father through Christ, and will much less deny us what we ask of Him in faith than our parents refuse us earthly things.(Heidelberg Catechism, Q&A 120) It is not uncommon to hear critics of Reformation theology complain that Martin Luther, John Calvin, and those who followed them, were so preoccupied with justification, … View Resource

  • Christ’s Call to Make Disciples Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2016

    One of the most exciting times of my life was when I was converted to Christ. I was filled with a zeal for evangelism. However, much to my consternation, when I told my friends about my conversion to Christ, they thought I was crazy. They were tragically amused, remaining unconvinced despite my sharing the gospel with them. Finally, they asked me, “Why don’t you start a class and teach us what you have learned about Jesus?” They were serious. I was elated. We scheduled a time to meet—but they never showed up. Despite my profound desire for evangelism, I was … View Resource

  • Cut Off Your Hand, Tear Out Your Eye Article by Ray Ortlund

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2015

    Hard words are not harmful words—when they come from Jesus. This is important to keep in mind when we read: If your hand or your foot causes you to sin, cut it off and throw it away. It is better for you to enter life crippled or lame than with two hands or two feet to be thrown into the eternal fire. And if your eye causes you to sin, tear it out and throw it away. It is better for you to enter life with one eye than with two eyes to be thrown into the hell of fire. … View Resource

  • The Divine Foundation of Authority Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2009

    You’re out!” “I’m safe!” “Out!” “Safe!” “Out!” “It’s my ball, and it’s my bat, and I say that I’m safe.” This is how we settled disputes over plays in our pickup baseball games played without the benefit of a referee or umpire. When a disputed play could not be resolved through reason or through yelling, the one who possessed the equipment usually determined the outcome. It was a child’s game in which might made right. It was the nascent expression of the cynical statement: “He who owns the gold, rules.” These illustrations indicate that at some level ownership is involved in … View Resource

  • Divine Incomprehensibility Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2014 | Genesis 1

    What can we know about God? That’s the most basic question of theology, for what we can know about God and whether we can know anything about Him at all determine the scope and content of our study. Here we must consider the teaching of the greatest theologians in history, all of whom have affirmed the “incomprehensibility of God.” By using the term incomprehensible, they are not referring to something we are unable to comprehend or know at all. Theologically speaking, to say God is incomprehensible is not to say that God is utterly unknowable. It is to say … View Resource

  • Established Boundaries Article by Robert Letham

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2006

    The Eastern and Western churches have understood the Trinity in rather different ways, each with distinct problems. For the East, the person of the Father is the center of divine unity. The potential danger is a subordinationist tendency, with the Son and the Holy Spirit having a derivative status. On the other hand, the West, since Augustine, has focused on the one divine essence (being), only with difficulty accounting for the real eternal distinctions between the persons. A less-than fully personal view of God has resulted. Its bias is in a modalist direction, wherein the distinct persons are blurred. Unfortunately, … View Resource

  • Forgetting God Article by Benjamin Shaw

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2016

    We live in a funny age. Some people still have telephone landlines. But they mostly use them to call their cell phone because they have forgotten where they left it. And they need the cell phone, because it has an app that helps them find their car keys, for they have forgotten where they put their car keys. This kind of forgetfulness is largely due to being busy, distracted, and inattentive. Though such forgetfulness is often a forgetfulness of things, it can easily become a forgetfulness of people. We forget that we were supposed to pick someone up because we … View Resource

  • For the Glory of God Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2014

    At the church I co-pastor, Saint Andrew’s Chapel in Sanford, Florida, we are deliberate about making sure that both our church members and visitors understand the doctrinal basis of our fellowship. As a small way of helping to further that end, we note in our church bulletin every Sunday morning that “we affirm the solas of the Protestant Reformation.” By way of reminder, the five solas are five points that summarize the biblical theology recovered and proclaimed during the Protestant Reformation. As we note in our bulletin, these five solas are: Sola Scriptura: The Bible is the sole written divine … View Resource

  • Glory Article by John Currid

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2011

    In Exodus 33, we witness an intimate discourse between God and Moses. Within this divine human dialogue, Moses makes an odd request: “Moses said, ‘Please show me your glory.’ And he said, ‘I will make all my goodness pass before you and will proclaim before you my name “The LORD.” And I will be gracious to whom I will be gracious, and will show mercy on whom I will show mercy’” (vv. 18–19). What exactly is Moses asking of God when he requests to see His “glory”? And how do we understand God’s answer to Moses’ question? Moses’ question to … View Resource

  • God Article by John Piper

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2016

    Have you ever asked why God’s forgiveness is of any value? Or what about eternal life? Have you ever asked why you want eternal life? These questions matter because it is possible to want forgiveness and eternal life for reasons that may well indicate that you don’t have them. Take forgiveness, for example. You might want God’s forgiveness because you are so miserable with guilt feelings. You just want relief. If you can believe that He forgives you, you will have some relief, but not necessarily salvation. If you want forgiveness only because of emotional relief, you won’t have God’s … View Resource

  • God Is Love Article by Robert Letham

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2004

    In contrast to the East, the Western church (Rome and Protestantism) has had difficulty doing justice to the distinct identities of the three persons of the Trinity. Augustine compared them to memory, knowledge, and will — merely three aspects of a single mind — while Aquinas held that the three are “relations” in the one divine being. This trend has been pervasive — John Calvin and John Owen are notable exceptions — but, with the reappearance of the Eastern church on the radar, it is becoming recognized that equal justice should be done to the irreducible distinctions of the three … View Resource

  • God Never Forgets Us Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2016

    We are a forgetful people. We too often overlook the majesty of creation and how it directs our gaze to our sovereign, holy, and gracious Creator. We forget to give God glory for creating us and for sustaining us. We forget to thank Him for all blessings. We forget to pray to Him, and we forget to praise Him. We forget His steadfast and abounding love. We forget what Christ has done for us, in us, and through us. We forget Christ’s law-fulfilling life, and we forget His sacrificial, atoning death. We forget His resurrection, and we forget that we … View Resource

  • Growing in Humility Article by Geoffrey Thomas

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2016

    There is no other way of achieving humility than by looking unto Jesus. Paul tells us, “He humbled himself and became obedient to death—even death on a cross” (Phil. 2:8). The Son of God humbled Himself. That was something extraordinary. But there is more. He was made in human likeness. God the Son in a stable, His diapers being changed, and His being washed and fed by a young mother, Mary. But there is more. He took the very nature of a servant. God washing feet. But there is more. As Donald Macleod states in A Faith to Live By … View Resource

  • Have Eternal Life Article by William Barcley

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2016

    This past summer, because of the generosity of friends in our church, my wife and I were able to spend a week together in Cozumel, Mexico. It was a wonderful trip. Our resort was on the beach. The food was excellent. The water was a beautiful shade of blue I’d never seen before. But best of all, I was able to have uninterrupted enjoyment of my bride of twenty-five years. One day, late in the afternoon, when we were sitting on the beach reading, without a care in the world except for when we were going to get ready to … View Resource