• What Is Grace? Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2015

    A number of decades ago at the Ligonier Valley Study Center, we sent out a Thanksgiving card with this simple statement: “The essence of theology is grace; the essence of Christian ethics is gratitude.” In all the debates about our role versus God’s role in sanctification—our growth in holiness—we’d stay on the right track if we’d remember this grace-gratitude dynamic. The more we understand how kind God has been to us and the more we are overcome by His mercy, the more we are inclined to love Him and to serve Him. Yet we can’t get the grace-gratitude dynamic right … View Resource

  • Israel’s Salvation Article by Ken Jones

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2010

    The eleventh chapter of Romans opens with the apostle Paul, a descendant of Abraham, asking the question: “Has God rejected [ethnic Israel]?” The short answer to this question is given in verse 5: “So too at the present time there is a remnant, chosen by grace.” This comes after Paul alludes to Elijah’s rebuke of Israel for killing God’s prophets and destroying His altars (vv. 3–4; see 1 Kings 19:10, 14). But the question about Israel’s status permeates much of the letter to the Romans, especially chapters 1–2 and 9–11. Israel’s status is particularly emphasized in chapters 9 and 10, … View Resource

  • Source of True Teaching Article by Kim Riddlebarger

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2009

    Q. What rule hath God given to direct us how we may glorify and enjoy him?  A. The Word of God, which is contained in the Scriptures of the Old and New Testaments, is the only rule to direct us how we may glorify and enjoy him. (Westminster Shorter Catechism Q&A 2) When someone begins a statement with “I think God is like…,” I immediately know that this person doesn’t have a clue as to what God is like. The reason I can say this is because God is an infinite spiritual being, which means that we can know nothing … View Resource

  • Adopted Sons and Daughters Article by Kim Riddlebarger

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2009

    Q. Why did Christ command us to address God thus: “Our Father?” A. To awaken in us at the very beginning of our prayer that childlike reverence for and trust in God, which are to be the ground of our prayer, namely, that God has become our Father through Christ, and will much less deny us what we ask of Him in faith than our parents refuse us earthly things.(Heidelberg Catechism, Q&A 120) It is not uncommon to hear critics of Reformation theology complain that Martin Luther, John Calvin, and those who followed them, were so preoccupied with justification, … View Resource

  • Inexplicable Love Article by John Sartelle

    By this all people will know that you are my disciples, if you have love for one another” (John 13:35). The fish symbol worn as a lapel pin or displayed as a bumper sticker — a gold cross worn as a necklace — is that how Jesus said His followers would be identified? That would have been so easy. Just put on a necklace or pin a cross on your lapel, and you will be declaring your faith to the world. No heart-rending changes, no need to touch the AIDS patient. You can let the ugly, the irregular, the unlovable … View Resource

  • A Rose Is a Rose Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | April 1998

    A rose is a rose is a rose. This dictum reinforces the adage that a rose by any other name is still a rose. The idea is that the essence of the rose is not conditioned by what name is attached to it. It is its res, not its nomina, that determines what it is. In different languages, the same flower is known by different names, but it is still the same flower. When we apply this idea to theology things get a bit more complicated. Indeed the rose adage has been transferred indiscriminately to religion in … View Resource

  • Winning Back His Bride Article by Sam Storms

    FROM TABLETALK | May 1992

    This month is special to me and my wife, Ann. It was on May 26, 1972, that we stood in the presence of family, friends, and our heavenly Father and there pledged to one another to be faithful “till death do us part.” So far, so good.Twenty years! Notwithstanding the ups and downs and those moments of sheer exasperation, they’ve been twenty good years. I attribute this largely to the fact that, by God’s grace, we have indeed been faithful to that initial vow. We’ve learned that mutual fidelity is crucial to any lasting relationship.I can’t imagine the … View Resource