• Ministering to the Sexually Broken: An Interview with John Freeman Article by John Freeman

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2014

    Tabletalk: What is Harvest USA and why is its mission compelling to you? John Freeman: Harvest USA began in 1983 as a ministry outreach of Tenth Presbyterian Church in Philadelphia. Now an independent 501(c)(3) nonprofit, we are also a Mission to North Americarecommended mercy ministry that is closely associated with the Presbyterian Church in America. Our staff has both teaching and ruling elders. We exist to offer biblical truth and mercy to individuals, families, youth, and churches affected by pornography, sexual addictions, and homosexuality. We educate and equip the local church to be better enabled to minister the gospel … View Resource

  • A Dwelling Place for God Article by Ben Dunson

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2013

    In the Old Testament, God’s presence with His people was most vividly manifested in the earthly symbols of Israel’s tabernacle and temple. As symbols or types, these institutions pointed to a future fulfillment. That fulfillment is found in Jesus Christ, the full and final manifestation of God’s presence with His people. The Israelite high priest could only enter once a year into the holiest inner chamber of the temple, which was the locus of God’s presence among His people. In so doing, the high priest served as an intermediary for the people, coming into the presence of God on their … View Resource

  • The Church and Israel in the New Testament Article by Keith Mathison

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2012

    One of the most common questions asked by students of the Bible concerns the relationship between Israel and the church. We read the Old Testament, and it is evident that most of it concerns the story of Israel. From Jacob to the exile, the people of God is Israel, and Israel is the people of God. Despite the constant sin of king and people leading to the judgment of exile, the prophets look beyond this judgment with hope to a time of restoration for Israel. When we turn to the New Testament, the same story continues, and Israel is still … View Resource

  • The Church and Israel in the Old Testament Article by Iain Duguid

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2012

    In the beginning, God created Adam and Eve to be a worshipping community: He would be their God and they would be His people. The fall, however, shattered their fellowship with one another as well as with God, a division that was deepened even further in the next generation when Cain murdered his brother. The trajectory away from God begun by Cain’s line ended with a counterfeit worshipping community in Babel (Gen. 11). At the same time, a line of true worshippers ran through Seth to Abram—Abraham—whom God promised to make a great nation and through whom He promised to … View Resource

  • Who Draws the Line? Article by Sean Michael Lucas

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2012

    As Jesus ascended into heaven, He delegated His authority to the Apostles to make disciples: “Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, teaching them to observe all that I have commanded you” (Matt. 28:19–20a). This delegation of authority has typically served as the basis for thinking about the authority (or power) of the disciples gathered as the church. In other words, here Jesus grants authority to order worship (implied in baptism and teaching) and to declare doctrine (implied in teaching what Jesus … View Resource

  • The Church is One Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2012

    In the seventeenth chapter of his gospel, the Apostle John recounts the most extensive prayer that is recorded in the New Testament. It is a prayer of intercession by Jesus for His disciples and for all who would believe through their testimony. Consequently, this prayer is called Jesus’ High Priestly Prayer. Christ implored the Father in this prayer that His people might be one. He went so far as to ask the Father that “they may be one even as we are one” (v. 22b). He desired that the unity of the people of God — the unity of the … View Resource

  • The Gates of Hell Article by Kevin DeYoung

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2011

    I hope I don’t ruin one of your favorite verses. Ok, I kind of hope I do, but only so it can be one of your favorite verses in a better way. In Matthew 16, Jesus takes his disciples to the district of Caesarea Philippi and asks them the question: “Who do people say that the Son of Man is?” They stumble around a bit , giving the latest updates from the crowd. Then Cephas pipes up: “You are the Christ, the Son of the living God.” Jesus commends His outspoken disciple: “You are Peter, and on this rock I … View Resource

  • Church Article by Derek Thomas

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2011

    In the language of the Westminster Confession of Faith, the church comprises the “whole number of the elect, that have been, are, or shall be, gathered into one, under Christ the Head thereof” (25.1). This is otherwise known as the invisible church. In another sense, the church is the body of the faithful (1 Cor. 12:27; Eph. 2:21–22; Rev. 21:2, 9), consisting of those throughout the world who outwardly profess faith, together with their children (WCF 25.2). This is otherwise known as the visible church. The Greek word that is translated as “church” in the Bible is ekklēsia. Conscious … View Resource

  • What Kind of Unity? Article by William W. Goligher

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2011

    Thomas Manton, a seventeenth century minister, once wrote, “Divisions in the church breed atheism in the world.” Certainly the lack of unity in the church distracts minds, breaks hearts, squanders energy, and inhibits evangelism. Unity in the church is important to God. John 17 has been described as “a standing monument of Christ’s affection to the Church.” At least three times Jesus prays for the Church’s unity and witness: “that they all may be one” (v. 21); “that they may be one even as we are one” (v. 22); “that they may become perfectly one” (v. 23); so that all … View Resource

  • Nothing Like the Church Article by Robert Rayburn

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2011

    It should come as no surprise that in Western culture, triumphantly individualistic as it is, institutions tend to suffer in people’s estimations. Christians, shaped too much by this culture, predictably have a diminished appreciation even for their very own institution. They may recognize a certain need for the church, but neither loyalty to and love for her, on the one hand, nor a conviction that an individual Christian’s fortunes are bound up with those of the church, on the other, is as central to Christian piety as in earlier ages. Christians nowadays do not typically sing songs in their worship … View Resource

  • Holy War: Jesus Style Article by Nicholas Batzig

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2011

    While it may not appear evident at first glance, both the Holy War in which Israel was engaged in the Old Covenant (Ex. 34:11–16) and the Holy War in which Christians are engaged in the New Covenant (Eph. 6:10–19) are directly related to the saving work of Christ. A biblical theology of the Land and temple enables us to make sense of holy war in the Old and New Testaments by giving insights into the holy war that God waged on Christ at the cross. This keeps us from dissecting the Bible into two unrelated books. The cross is the … View Resource

  • All Out of Whack Article by Kevin DeYoung

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2011

    I’m going to go out on a limb and guess that the average reader of this fine periodical is a fan of theology. I’m thinking most Tabletalk subscribers are thoughtful, doctrinally attuned Christians. I also imagine a few of these Christians might be a wee bit opinionated. It takes one to know one. I don’t use opinionated as a bad word. We should be immovable on some matters, convinced of others, and it’s not bad to have strong opinions on all the rest. But let’s be honest; sometimes in conservative evangelical circles, the intensity with which we hold to our … View Resource

  • Schism and the Local Church Article by Michael G. Brown

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2011

    Although the Great Schism occurred in the eleventh century, dealing with schismatic people in the local church has been a problem since the days of the apostles. Writing to the church at Corinth around AD 55, Paul said, “I appeal to you, brothers, by the name of our Lord Jesus Christ, that all of you agree and that there be no divisions among you, but that you be united in the same mind and the same judgment. For it has been reported … that there is quarreling among you, my brothers” (1 Cor. 1:10–11). The word the apostle … View Resource

  • Final Judgment Article by John Sartelle

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2010

    It is the Lord who judges me” (1 Cor. 4:4). Evangelical Christians have a proclivity to pronounce judgment on all things pertaining to our Lord’s church. We treat this as a right and an obligation. It begins most Sundays over lunch, or in the car on the way home, or perhaps in the church foyer after the service. We pronounce commendations and condemnations on the music, Sunday school teachers, sermons, choirs, ministers, elders, and deacons. Sometimes that judgment renders a commendation that lifts individuals to a completed sanctification or a condemnation that exiles others to a region in the vicinity … View Resource

  • Something Old, Something New Article by Eric Watkins

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2010

    How can confessional Reformed churches provide a safe haven for New Calvinists? A simple answer to this may fail to appreciate the diversity of each new Calvinist’s spiritual pilgrimage, and thus runs the danger of not ministering particular grace to particular people in their particular situations. But that does not mean that there are not certain ideas (even general ones) that may be helpful for confessional pastors and churches to consider as they seek to minister to these weathered pilgrims seeking spiritual haven. View Resource