• Covenant and Culture Article by Gene Edward Veith

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2006

    The word covenant is a theological term. But it is also a cultural term. It has to do with God’s primal design for how human beings, fallen though we be, can live together and form a society. Social philosophers and political theorists talk about the “social compact” or the “social contract.” The concept in its different nuances was developed by Hobbes, Locke, and Rousseau, though it goes back to the ancient Greeks. It states that governments and, indeed, cultures entail a tacit but binding agreement between parties: I will obey your laws if you protect my rights. I will … View Resource

  • In the Service of the King Article by Chris Donato

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2006

    Our story begins in the thick of the action: a middle-aged Martin Luther is busy at work reforming the doctrine of the provincial German churches. He soon settles on issues surrounding the Christian life. In response to the medieval church’s insistence that the only truly Christian calling necessarily involved a withdrawal or retreat from society (by becoming a monk), Luther began arguing that calling can and ought to affirm the spiritual value of work in this world. In other words, ordinary, every-day work has significant religious value. It may seem silly to us, but this was a reinterpretation of calling … View Resource

  • A Passion for Truth Article by George Grant

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2006

    The prince of preachers, Charles Haddon Spurgeon, once wrote in his wonderful John Plowman’s Talks, “I would have everybody able to read and write and cipher; indeed, I don’t think a man can know too much; but mark you, the knowing of these things is not education; and there are millions of your reading and writing people who are as ignorant as neighbor Norton’s calf.” Those ignorant masses of whom Spurgeon wrote are not those who failed to finish their lessons. They are instead those who did finish — or rather those who naïvely thought that lessons were the … View Resource

  • Exceptional Mediocrity Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2006

    In my book The Hunger for Significance I explored the desire commonly found among us to find some basis for dignity, for value, for worth in our lives. I wrote at that time: “Modern man has an aching void. The emptiness we feel cannot be relieved by a new car, a better job, a bigger house. It can only be filled by understanding that each human life is significant. Our lives cannot be reduced to meaninglessness.” The modern quest for significance and human dignity is often prompted by the overwhelming aura of despair that penetrates the cultural worldview in … View Resource

  • Worldly Standards Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2006

    I was asked recently what my favorite sports and hobbies are. My reply was simple: My favorite sports are hunting, fishing, and eating, and similarly, my favorite hobbies are talking about hunting, fishing, and eating. Although my abilities to hunt and fish will take a lifetime to refine, I have already perfected the art of eating. And having always had a keen interest in the social and psychological sciences, I could easily add the sport of people-watching to my list of favorites. I am simply fascinated by people — the way people dress, how people communicate, and what people do … View Resource

  • The Antidote to Post-humanism Article by Albert Mohler

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2005

    Are you ready for the posthuman future? We are living in an age of radical transformations in science, technology, and worldview. Standing at the center of the worldview now dominant in our society is an affirmation that human beings have the right, if not the responsibility, to “improve” themselves in every way. In a culture that celebrates youth, attractiveness, and achievement, the idea of personal improvement is now being stretched beyond what previous generations could have imagined. “It is a natural human desire to manipulate our bodies to look better, feel better, and age better,” ethicist Wesley Smith explains … View Resource

  • Foundations of Political Action Article by Albert Mohler

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2005

    On August 24 of the year 410, the Visigoths under Alaric entered Rome, and they plundered the city for several days. Within weeks, word of the catastrophe had been conveyed throughout the Roman Empire, even to a small North African town called Hippo, which had been blessed with a bishop named Aurelius Augustine. The greatest theologian of the early church, Augustine was faced not only with the unthinkable reality of Rome’s fall, but also with the unique challenge that those in Rome blamed Christians for the empire’s demise. They claimed that Christianity had weakened the political will of Rome and … View Resource

  • Preserving the Godly Article by Robert Rothwell

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2005

    The older I get the more I become a news “junkie.” Some of my friends like to tease me because if they call or visit and I am watching television, it is invariably a cable news network of some kind. I have always been interested in what is going on in society, and in this way I can know what is happening 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. As I watch these programs, I often think about how much American culture has changed in the past ten years. Now by no means do I want to imply … View Resource

  • Sanctity of Life Article by John Davis

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2005

    The simple but sublime words of Genesis 1:26 that God created mankind in His own image and likeness are some of the most important words in all of Scripture. The teaching that man is the image and likeness of God is absolutely foundational for a Christian understanding of human nature, the dignity and value of the person, and for all of Christian ethics. It is the purpose of this article to explore briefly some of the important practical implications of this crucial, biblical truth for Christian living and for contemporary ethical issues such as capital punishment, human rights, abortion … View Resource

  • The Pornographic Seduction Article by Albert Mohler

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2005

    Every culture is challenged by its own seductions, but our culture is confronted with the present undeniable fact that we have transformed seduction into an art form. In essence, the cultures of the West are now examples of what the late sociologist Pitirim Sorokin called a “late, degenerate sensate culture.” Our twisted desires have become the celebrated engines of culture and the economy. The rise of America’s pornographic culture may be the clearest evidence of this seduction. Once peddled in the back alleys, porn has now become big business — the seventh-largest industry in America, by some estimates. Pornography … View Resource

  • Committed Surrender Article by John Sartelle

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2005

    Therefore, let those who suffer according to God’s will entrust their souls to a faithful Creator” (1 Peter 4:19). Whatever happened to dating? I first noticed a decline in dating when our daughter, Jamie, was in high school. She told me she was just going out with friends. Going out with friends turned into “hanging out” with friends. Evidently dating was “out” and hanging out was “in.” If I understood the cultural vernacular, hanging out meant less of a commitment. The way Jamie and her friends used the word I got the idea that “dating” was one step … View Resource

  • Godly Living in a Sexually Immoral Culture Article by John Freeman

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2005

    The call came into my office several months ago. A woman requested to be taken off our mailing list. I assured her that we would comply with her request. I asked the reason she did not want to receive our newsletter any longer. “If homosexuality really is a gift from God,” she replied, “then your ministry is doing great damage to people.” Although her answer didn’t shock me — people in evangelical circles are increasingly being enticed by the same deceptions — her response, considering her background and her church, did. She shared that she had been a … View Resource

  • A Depraved New World Article by Gene Edward Veith

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2005

    Sexual immorality is nothing new, of course, as we can tell from the Bible’s warnings against it. What is new is that sexual immorality now has cultural approval. Men and women who had sex without being married to each other once felt ashamed and practiced their fornication in secret. Now, having sex outside of marriage is taken for granted as part of the single life and has become the rule, not the exception. Young women who became pregnant out of wedlock once dropped out of sight to go to special homes where they could have their baby out of the … View Resource

  • Cultural Revolution Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2005

    In the early years of the 1950s the phenomenon of broadcast television was beginning to sweep America. In these early days, however, it was still a small minority of American households that proudly owned a television set. At this time, a ban was executed by the networks prohibiting the use of the word “virgin” in television broadcasts. The censorship of this word was explained in light of the term’s close connection to matters of sexuality. So sensitive were the original producers of television towards offending the ethics and mores of the American public that words as seemingly harmless as the … View Resource

  • The Law of Life Article by Albert Mohler

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2005

    It need not further be denied,” argued James Orr, “that between this view of the world involved in Christianity, and what is sometimes called ‘the modern view of the world’ there exists a deep and radical antagonism.” James Orr observed this “deep and radical antagonism” over a century ago. Can we possibly fail to see it now? As Christians, we are unavoidably engaged in a great battle of worldviews — a conflict over the most basic issues of truth and meaning. A worldview that starts with the existence and sovereign authority of the self-revealing God of the Bible … View Resource