• Fear of Loss Article by Thomas Schreiner

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2013

    On August 17, 2012, my wife suffered a nearly fatal bicycle accident. For the first few days, we didn’t know whether she would live and in subsequent weeks, we didn’t know what her future mental capacities would be. Thankfully, the Lord has restored her almost completely to what she was before the accident. This accident personalized for me a real fear that we all experience, namely, the fear of losing our spouses or our children to death. How will we live without them? Christian parents, particularly, fear that their children may never come to faith. They can scarcely … View Resource

  • Jesus’ Mission to the Lost: Luke 15 Article by Thomas Schreiner

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2012

    When reading Luke 15, it is easy to forget the context , especial ly when reading the parable of the prodigal son. The chapter opens with the Pharisees and scribes criticizing Jesus for eating with tax collectors and sinners (vv. 1–2). Jesus’ table fellowship with sinners signifies the gospel of grace. All those who turn from their sin and put their faith in God will enjoy the messianic feast forever. Jesus tells His opponents three parables to defend His table fellowship with sinners: the parable of the lost sheep (vv. 3–7); the parable of the lost coin (vv. 8–10); and what … View Resource

  • Wright Is Wrong on Imputation Article by Thomas Schreiner

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2010

    Is the imputation of Christ’s righteousness to the believer an artificial construct, an idea from systematic theology that does not truly come from the Bible? N.T. Wright argues that the traditional view of imputation veers away from the Pauline meaning. View Resource

  • Was Luther Right? Article by Thomas Schreiner

    Martin Luther turned the world upside down in the sixteenth century by proclaiming the Pauline gospel. Luther, who was a professor of biblical exegesis for many years, slowly came to an understanding of the righteousness of God in Rom. 1:17. For many years he believed that God’s righteousness was a divine attribute, so that the Pauline meaning was that God rendered to a person according to his works. In other words, Rom. 1:17 referred to the judging righteousness of God. View Resource

  • That They May Be the One Article by Thomas Schreiner

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2009

      The Lord Jesus prayed on the night before His death: “I do not ask for these only, but also for those who will believe in me through their word, that they may all be one, just as you, Father, are in me, and I in you, that they also may be in us, so that the world may believe that you have sent me. The glory that you have given me I have given to them, that they may be one even as we are one, I in them and you in me, that they may become perfectly one … View Resource

  • Apostle to the Gentiles Article by Thomas Schreiner

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2006

    Paul’s conversion on the Damascus Road also represented his calling to serve as a missionary to the nations. The Lord made it clear when Paul was converted that he was “a chosen instrument of mine to carry my name before the Gentiles and kings and the children of Israel” (Acts 9:15). Paul’s role as a missionary is captured by the words Jesus spoke to him on the Damascus Road according to Acts 26:18: “…to open their eyes, so that they may turn from darkness to light and from the power of Satan to God, that they may … View Resource