• Out with the Old and in with the New Article by Richard Pratt Jr.

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2014 | Luke 22

    Followers of Christ repeat Jesus’ words “this cup is the new covenant” every time they observe the Lord’s Supper. All over the world, local churches include the words new covenant in their names. But if you ask most Christians the question, “What is the new covenant?” you get about as many answers as the number of people you ask. What, then, is the new covenant? What is new about it? How is it fulfilled in Christ? WHAT IS THE NEW COVENANT? The foretelling of the new covenant in Jeremiah 31:31–34 begins in this way: Behold, the days are … View Resource

  • Fear of Failure Article by Richard Pratt Jr.

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2013

    A friend of mine once told me: “My fear of failure has caused a big problem between my family and me. I don’t spend much time with them during the week. I dread failing at my job so much that it drives me to work day and night. But I don’t spend much time with them on weekends either. The fear of failing at something that I’m not used to doing absolutely paralyzes me.” Even if we don’t go to extremes like my friend, the possibility of failure is not something we enjoy. We all fall … View Resource

  • Broken Homes in the Bible Article by Richard Pratt Jr.

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2011

    Unless you live in complete isolation, you have seen a broken home. Maybe it’s the family of a friend or a relative; maybe it’s your own home. Families fall apart in ways that are short-lived and lifelong, hidden from view and out there for everyone to see. Whatever the case, hardly anything perplexes and discourages us more than broken homes. Why Are So Many Homes Broken? The Scriptures teach us that the pandemic of damaged families we see today is nothing new. Many of us attribute the problem to recent cultural shifts — the decline of religion and … View Resource

  • Reformed Theology Is Covenant Theology Article by Richard Pratt Jr.

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2010

    Reformed theology is often associated with “covenant theology.” If you listen carefully, you’ll often hear pastors and teachers describe themselves as “Reformed and covenantal.” The terms Reformed and covenant are used together so widely that it behooves us to understand why they are connected. Covenant theology refers to one of the basic beliefs that Calvinists have held about the Bible. All Protestants who have remained faithful to their heritage affirm sola Scriptura, the belief that the Bible is our supreme and unquestionable authority. Covenant theology, however, distinguishes the Reformed view of Scripture from other Protestant outlooks by emphasizing that divine … View Resource