• A Call for Endurance Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2015

    I’m not a prophet or the son of a prophet. I’ve made a lot of predictions and guesses about the future that haven’t come true. As I told the congregation of Saint Andrew’s Chapel a few weeks ago during a sermon, I’m not infallible, nor have I ever claimed to be infallible. On occasion, however, my predictions of the future have been accurate. When you’ve been writing a monthly column for as long as I have, you invariably comment on cultural matters and the direction that the culture is heading. Recently, I was reading … View Resource

  • Sacramental Assistance Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2015

    We all have those moments in our lives that we say were formative for the shaping of who we are today. We celebrate birthdays in our homes every year. We remember our wedding anniversaries and the dates on which we first met our spouses or made a life-changing career decision. Often, these events have sights and smells that are associated with them, or particular sights and smells bring to mind particular episodes or feelings. If your mother made you a special batch of chicken soup every time you got sick, smelling hot chicken broth might evoke fond memories of her … View Resource

  • What Is Grace? Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2015

    A number of decades ago at the Ligonier Valley Study Center, we sent out a Thanksgiving card with this simple statement: “The essence of theology is grace; the essence of Christian ethics is gratitude.” In all the debates about our role versus God’s role in sanctification—our growth in holiness—we’d stay on the right track if we’d remember this grace-gratitude dynamic. The more we understand how kind God has been to us and the more we are overcome by His mercy, the more we are inclined to love Him and to serve Him. Yet we can’t get … View Resource

  • Doubt and Obedience Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2015 | Joshua 7

    One comment that Christian pastors sometimes hear from people they are counseling is that it would be easier for them to have a strong faith if they could see God doing the same kinds of miracles today as are recorded in the Bible. The unspoken assumption is that seeing is believing—that the people who lived in Jesus’ day found themselves more readily trusting Him because they could see His great works. Such comments show the need for a closer reading of Scripture, for there are many cases where seeing great miracles didn’t move observers to faith. For example, John … View Resource

  • Preaching and Teaching Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2015 | John 21

    Over the years, I’ve made no secret of my admiration for men such as Martin Luther and John Calvin, who were so instrumental in the recovery of the gospel during the Protestant Reformation of the sixteenth century. I’m amazed by their towering intellects and their ability to stand firm amid much danger. Their love for biblical truth is an example to follow, and as I approach twenty years of weekly preaching at Saint Andrew’s Chapel, I’m particularly grateful for their pastoral model. Both of these men were “celebrities” in their day, but neither of them spent … View Resource

  • Our Beautiful God Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2014 | 1 Chronicles 16

    I’ve always found it interesting that the Bible often makes reference to the beautiful. In fact, if you took the time to look up every reference to “beauty” or every reference to “the beautiful” in a concordance, you would see that the word beauty in one form or another occurs frequently in the pages of sacred Scripture, particularly in the Old Testament. First Chronicles 16:29 is one of the places where we read of beauty: “Give to the Lord the glory due His name; Bring an offering, and come before Him. Oh, worship the Lord in the beauty … View Resource

  • The Church’s One Foundation Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2014 | 1 Corinthians 3

    More than forty years ago, Los Angeles experienced a terrible earthquake, one of the worst in the city’s history. I remember the event because just before the earthquake, I had driven a friend of mine to the airport so that he could catch a flight to Los Angeles, where he was a pastor. The earthquake affected his church, and he later told me that at first everything seemed to be fine with the sanctuary building. Although there was no visible damage of any significance, a later inspection revealed that the foundation of the church had shifted to such a … View Resource

  • The Secret to a Happy Life Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2014 | James 4

    James is sometimes called the “New Testament book of Proverbs.” That’s because of passages such as James 4 that give us a series of loosely linked aphorisms of practical, godly wisdom. This chapter begins with our universal concern about conflict: What causes quarrels and what causes fights among you? Is it not this, that your passions are at war within you? You desire and do not have, so you murder. You covet and cannot obtain, so you fight and quarrel. You do not have, because you do not ask. You ask and do not receive, because you ask wrongly … View Resource

  • The Blessing of Great Teachers Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2014 | 2 Timothy 3

    Since I’ve spent the majority of my professional career as a teacher of Scripture, philosophy, and theology, I’ve often had the opportunity to think about matters of pedagogy and other issues related to instruction. One thing that’s always struck me as I have considered what it means to be an effective teacher is that most of the great teachers in history were themselves students of other great instructors. Socrates taught Plato; Plato taught Aristotle; and Aristotle taught Alexander the Great. The entire history of Western ideas has been affected by these four men. In theology, we see … View Resource

  • Divine Incomprehensibility Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2014 | Genesis 1

    What can we know about God? That’s the most basic question of theology, for what we can know about God and whether we can know anything about Him at all determine the scope and content of our study. Here we must consider the teaching of the greatest theologians in history, all of whom have affirmed the “incomprehensibility of God.” By using the term incomprehensible, they are not referring to something we are unable to comprehend or know at all. Theologically speaking, to say God is incomprehensible is not to say that God is utterly unknowable. It is to say … View Resource

  • The Holy Love of God Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2014 | Romans 1

    Long ago, Augustine of Hippo pointed out that the desire of every human heart is to experience a love that is transcendent. Regrettably for us today, however, I don’t think there’s any word in the English language that’s been more stripped of the depth of its meaning than the word love. Due to the shallow romanticism of secular culture, we tend to view the love of God in the same way popular music, art, and literature view love. Yet the Bible says God’s love is far different—and greater. First John 4:7-11 gives us this classic … View Resource

  • The Purposes of God Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2014 | Genesis 50

    Why?” This simple question is loaded with assumptions about what philosophers call “teleology.” Teleology, which comes from the Greek word for “goal” or “end” (telos), is the study of purpose. The “why” questions are purpose questions. We seek the reasons things happen as they do. Why does the rain fall? Why does the earth turn on its axis? Why did you say that? When we raise the question of purpose, we are concerned with ends, aims, and goals. All these terms suggest intent. They assume meaning rather than meaninglessness. Despite the best attempts of nihilist philosophers to deny that anything … View Resource

  • The Comfort of Jesus’ Prayers Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2014 | John 17

    As an ordained minister, I’ve had experience going to the Scriptures with a number of people in order to help them see what God has to say about many diƒfferent subjects. Over the years, one of the most common questions that I’ve been asked has to do with the meaning of Christ’s work for the security of the believer’s salvation. The New Testament gives us many categories for understanding that those who are truly saved will persevere. There is the category of justification, which tells us that we have received the imputation of Christ’s … View Resource

  • The Fall of a Believer Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2014

    We may live in a culture that believes everyone will be saved, that we are “justified by death” and all you need to do to go to heaven is die, but God’s Word certainly doesn’t give us the luxury of believing that. Any quick and honest reading of the New Testament shows that the Apostles were convinced that nobody can go to heaven unless they believe in Christ alone for their salvation (John 14:6; Rom. 10:9–10). Historically, evangelical Christians have largely agreed on this point. Where they have differed has been on the matter of the … View Resource

  • For the Glory of God Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2014

    At the church I co-pastor, Saint Andrew’s Chapel in Sanford, Florida, we are deliberate about making sure that both our church members and visitors understand the doctrinal basis of our fellowship. As a small way of helping to further that end, we note in our church bulletin every Sunday morning that “we affirm the solas of the Protestant Reformation.” By way of reminder, the five solas are five points that summarize the biblical theology recovered and proclaimed during the Protestant Reformation. As we note in our bulletin, these five solas are: Sola Scriptura: The Bible is the sole written … View Resource