• Speaking the Truth in Love Article by Phil Johnson

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2015

    Sometimes the best way to love your neighbor is to challenge a false belief that is holding him in confusion, discouragement, or some worse state of spiritual bondage. The idea that it’s unloving to defend truth or confront lies is one of the arrogant opinions of this postmodern age that needs to be torn down (2 Cor. 10:5). Authentic love “rejoices with the truth” (1 Cor. 13:6). Love and truth are perfectly symbiotic. Love without truth has no character. Truth without love has no power. Nowhere in Scripture is the essential connection between these two cardinal virtues … View Resource

  • Love by Submission Article by Phil Johnson

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2013

    Ephesians 5:21 poses a conundrum: Paul commends Spirit-filled Christians for “submitting to one another.” Isolate the verse from its context, and it almost sounds as if the Apostle teaches a kind of mutual, universal submission, without regard to any structured leadership, hierarchy, or chain of command—as if he means to declare all authority void. But in the very next verse, Paul expressly commands wives to be subject to their husbands (v. 22). Half a chapter later, he commands children to obey their parents (6:1) and slaves to obey their masters (6:5). Those injunctions aren’t followed by … View Resource

  • Salt of the Earth Article by Phil Johnson

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2012

    You are the salt of the earth… . You are the light of the world… . Let your light shine before others, so that they may see your good works and give glory to your Father who is in heaven” (Matt. 5:13–16). That text is often cited as if it were a mandate for the church to engage in political activism — lobbying, rallying voters, organizing protests, and harnessing the evangelical movement for political clout. I recently heard a well-known evangelical leader say, “We need to make our voices heard in the voting booth, or we’re not being salt and light … View Resource

  • What’s Wrong with Wright: Examining the New Perspective on Paul Article by Phil Johnson

    My assignment in this hour is to give a critical review of an influential book by Anglican author N.T. Wright, the Bishop of Durham. The book is titled What Saint Paul Really Said. It’s a fairly thin paperback, fewer than 200 pages, and although Wright is a prolific writer, best known and most influential because of his massive scholarly works, this little book—which is written in a simple style for the serious lay person—has undoubtedly been the most influential (and perhaps the most controversial) of all his published works. One of its aims is to explain the so-called “New Perspective … View Resource

  • A Defense of the Old Perspective on Paul: What Did Paul Really Say? Article by Phil Johnson

    The following is transcribed from a seminar given by Phil Johnson at the London Reformed Baptist Seminary, meeting at the Metropolitan Tabernacle, London, on 10 January 2004. In this hour, I want to give you a brief critique of a theological trend that began on your side of the Atlantic and is rapidly gaining influence among evangelicals in America. It is a point of view known as “The New Perspective on Paul.” View Resource

  • Angels: Messengers and Ministers of God Article by Phil Johnson

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2007

    Few biblical topics have provoked more wild speculation and fruitless debate than the topic of angels. Scripture doesn’t begin to answer all our questions about the subject. But there’s a lot more information about angels in the Bible than you might think. (As a matter of fact, the Old and New Testaments combined speak of angels more than 250 times.) And it’s important that we understand the biblical doctrine of angels correctly, especially in an age like ours, when so much popular superstition surrounds and obscures the truth about these glorious creatures. How many angels can dance on the head … View Resource

  • The Second Great Commandment Article by Phil Johnson

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2005

    When some Pharisees put Jesus to the test concerning the greatest of all God’s commandments, He answered with a quotation from Deuteronomy 6:5: “You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, with all your soul, and with all your strength.” “This is the first and great commandment,” He told them. “And the second is like it: ‘You shall love your neighbor as yourself’” (Matt. 22:38–39). What did He mean when He said the two commandments are alike? Well, obviously, they both deal with love. The first calls for wholehearted love toward God, a … View Resource