• Leading an Institution: An Interview with Ligon Duncan Article by Ligon Duncan

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2016

    Tabletalk: How did growing up in a Presbyterian home shape your faith? Ligon Duncan: It is almost impossible to calculate the wonderful influences I received at home and in my church growing up. My father (an eighth-generation Presbyterian ruling elder) and mother (a university professor, seminary graduate, and choir director in our local church) provided an example of the Christian life lived well, a loving home, devotion to the Lord, faithfulness to the truth, passion for learning, love for the church, and trust in Christ as He is offered in the gospel. My boyhood pastors preached and taught the Bible … View Resource

  • The Attractions of the New Perspective(s) on Paul Article by Ligon Duncan

    Many intelligent Christians are puzzling today over what is being called “the new perspective on Paul.” Seminary students run across it in their New Testament course reading and perhaps class lectures. Pastors hear about it from fledgling theologues wanting to impress them with their newfound knowledge of the latest thing in Pauline studies. Laypeople find it being peddled ubiquitously on the internet, on websites, in chatrooms or in various online discussion groups, as well as in numerous books on the Christian market, even from conservative evangelical publishing houses. Why talk about it? View Resource

  • N.T. Wright and the New Perspective on Paul Article by Ligon Duncan

    The term “new perspective” was coined by J.D.G. Dunn in 1982 to describe the new approach to Paul’s theology he was advocating which was built on the work of several earlier scholars such as E.P.Sanders in Paul and Palestinian Judaism (1977). It now is embraced by quite a range of scholars. One world-renowned Pauline scholar and articulate Anglican evangelical, N.T.(Tom) Wright (b. 1948), the current Canon theologian of Westminster Abbey is well known. For the purpose of this article the position Wright takes will be considered as explained in his numerous books including What St Paul Really Said (Oxford, … View Resource

  • The Ordinary Means of Growth Article by Ligon Duncan

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2007

      We are living in a confused and confusing time for confessional Christians (Christians who are anchored by a public and corporate theological commitment to be faithful to the Bible’s teaching on faith and practice as expounded by the great confessions of the Protestant Reformation). We are witnessing the final demise of theological liberalism, the rise of Pentecostalism, the beginnings of the so-called emerging church movement, the breakdown of evangelicalism, and an utter discombobulation about how the church is to conduct its life and ministry in an increasing “post-Christian” culture. All around us, in the name of reaching the culture … View Resource

  • The Constancy of a Pilgrim’s Life Article by Ligon Duncan

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2006

    It has been said that one hallmark of the Puritan view of the Christian life was the emphasis placed on being “constant” (or being steady and unchanging). Remember how John Bunyan puts the challenge to us to learn from the life of the pilgrim? Who would true valour see, let him come hither; one here will constant be, come wind, come weather. There’s no discouragement shall make him once relent his first avowed intent to be a pilgrim. That is, “if you want to know how to live a constant Christian life, come take a look at this guy.” … View Resource

  • Worship in Spirit and in Truth Article by Ligon Duncan

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2005

    In an unlikely encounter with an immoral Samaritan woman, our Lord Jesus uttered one of most important statements ever made about worship. In John’s deeply moving account of Jesus’ meeting with the woman at the well, after Jesus uncovers her hidden sin and shame, she asks Him about a worship matter of long dispute between Jews and Samaritans — and of great importance to them both: “Our fathers worshiped on this mountain, but you say that in Jerusalem is the place where people ought to worship.” Jesus said to her, “Woman, believe me, the hour is coming when neither … View Resource

  • Faith Works Article by Ligon Duncan

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2004

    So, if Christ is my righteousness, if I am accepted by God because of Him, if I am saved by grace alone, and justified because of Christ alone, and declared righteous by faith alone, where do good works fit in my Christian experience? Why should I pursue holiness? Why is personal righteousness important? Are good works necessary? If so, how do they fit? What is the place of good works in the Christian life in light of the completely sufficient righteousness of Christ imput- ed to us? Fortunately, the Bible has a clear answer for us. Paul emphasizes in various … View Resource