• Cursing of the Fig Tree Article by Daniel Doriani

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2015

    On Palm Sunday, Jesus entered Jerusalem to shouts of acclamation and then tossed the money-changers from the temple. God had appointed it as “a house of prayer,” but its priests had made it “a den of robbers.” Jesus spent the night in Bethany. As He returned the next morning, He was hungry. Seeing a fig tree by the road, he went up to it but found nothing on it except leaves. Then he said to it, “May you never bear fruit again!” Immediately the tree withered. (Matt. 21:18–19) This is surprising. Until now, Jesus’ miracles brought restoration. We cannot … View Resource

  • How Do I Apply Doctrine Personally? Article by Daniel Doriani

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2015

    Bill Watterson, creator of the Calvin and Hobbes comic strip, said he starts the creative process by holding a blank sheet of paper, staring into space, and letting his mind wander. Most teachers know the feeling, and have tried this “method” of applying doctrine to their people. but there is a better way. For centuries, ethicists have said that people can find a just, well-ordered life by asking three questions: What is my duty? What kind of person should I be? What goals or projects should we pursue? A fourth question seems essential: In an age of competing philosophies and … View Resource

  • The Importance of Sound Exegesis Article by Daniel Doriani

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2014

    A Bible scholar walks into a friend’s kitchen and sees a magnet fixing a diet plan to the refrigerator door. It reads, “‘For I know the plans I have for you,’ declares the Lord, ‘plans to prosper you … to give you hope and a future’ ” (Jer. 29:11, NIV). Is his dieting friend interpreting Scripture correctly? The first principle of interpretation is “Read contextually.” The Bible scholar thinks to himself, “Does he know that Jeremiah spoke to Israel’s leaders in exile in Babylon? That a word spoken to the nation of Israel isn’t necessarily a personal promise … View Resource

  • The End of Death Article by Daniel Doriani

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2000

    SIGNIFICANT EVENTS HAVE PHASES. IN SPORTS, athletes first build skill and endurance, then they play the game, and finally interpret the results, celebrating victory or learning from defeat. Banquets also have phases. After we savor the meal itself, we linger over coffee and dessert in conversation that appropriates the meal as an emblem of a life shared with friends. So, too, we must interpret and appropriate a most significant event, the death of death in the death and resurrection of Christ. The Crowds Misunderstood It The perpetrators and witnesses of Jesus’ death tried, unsuccessfully, to interpret its significance before the … View Resource