• Conquest and Settlement Article by Bryan Estelle

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2006

    Deuteronomy is the linchpin to the historical books. Deuteronomy is a covenant document that is the foundational constitutional document of the emerging Israelites. There is an astounding preview of Israel’s history at the end of Deuteronomy (chap. 27–30), which even warns of Israel’s distant exile should she prove unfaithful to her God, but with the added hope of restoration. The early history of the Israelites is illumined against the backdrop of the Mosaic covenant and the covenant of grace. In spite of the sins of Israel, God will make good on his promises to Abraham. The books of Joshua, Judges … View Resource

  • Israel’s Creed Article by Bryan Estelle

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2013

    The Shema begins with these words: “Hear, O Israel: the LORD our God, the LORD is one” (Deut. 6:4). The verbal imperative that begins this core affirmation for the Hebrews breaks forth from the text like a rosy dawn. Interestingly, the same appeal, “Hear, O Israel,” introduces the recounting of the Decalogue that begins in Deuteronomy 5:1. This indicates the significance of the utterance. Among the 5,845 verses in the Pentateuch (the first five books of the Bible), this creedal statement is definitely a keynote, as demonstrated by the significant roles this confession of faith subsequently played … View Resource

  • The Prophets Article by Bryan Estelle

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2008

    The post-exilic prophets include Haggai, Zechariah, Malachi, and probably Joel. They convey the message of God for this period of time with cumulative clarity since they come at the end of a long age of prophetic indictment against the people. These prophets have great explanatory power for progressive revelation up to their time. They also open the door to a new age soon to come. For a long time, God had made His desires known to the people in a covenant relationship formula that occurs time and again: “I will be their God, and they will be my people.” Even … View Resource