• The Holy Love of God Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2014 | Romans 1

    Long ago, Augustine of Hippo pointed out that the desire of every human heart is to experience a love that is transcendent. Regrettably for us today, however, I don’t think there’s any word in the English language that’s been more stripped of the depth of its meaning than the word love. Due to the shallow romanticism of secular culture, we tend to view the love of God in the same way popular music, art, and literature view love. Yet the Bible says God’s love is far different—and greater. First John 4:7-11 gives us this classic … View Resource

  • Pop Atheism and the Power of the Gospel Article by Dan DeWitt

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2014 | Romans 1

    Meanwhile, I am left with the Atheist on my hands,” Dorothy Sayers once penned to C.S. Lewis in a letter in which she sought some practical advice from the popular Oxford apologist. She went on to write, “I do not want him. I have no use for him. I have no missionary zeal at all.” While many Christians likely attempt to project a little more enthusiasm for evangelism, I’m not sure they do not, deep down, resonate with Sayers’ sentiment. With the relentless barrage of new atheist bravado over the last decade, believers are liable to grow weary … View Resource

  • What is the Gospel? Article by Ray Ortlund

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2015 | Romans 1

    The great nineteenth-century Princeton theologian Charles Hodge said, “The gospel is so simple that small children can understand it, and it is so profound that studies by the wisest theologians will never exhaust its riches.” The gospel is absolutely fundamental to everything we believe. It is at the very core of who we are as Christians. However, many professing Christians struggle to answer the question: What is the gospel? When I teach, I am astounded by how many of my students are unable to provide a biblically accurate explanation of what the gospel is, and, what’s more, what the … View Resource

  • Preach It Article by Kevin Gardner

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2015 | Romans 2

    Some years ago, it was common to see young evangelicals sporting a peculiar fashion accessory: the WWJD bracelet. These bracelets—the initials woven therein standing for “What Would Jesus Do?”—served to remind the wearer to consider the example of Christ in all his daily activities. For some, these bracelets likely also had a secondary function: evangelism. This was the case for a friend of mine who worked among many non-Christians. He told me one day that he wore the bracelet in order to elicit curiosity among his coworkers, in hopes that they would see it, along with his upstanding behavior … View Resource

  • Preaching the Wrath of God Article by Steven Lawson

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2014 | Romans 3

    The Genevan Reformer John Calvin said, “Preaching is the public exposition of Scripture by the man sent from God, in which God Himself is present in judgment and in grace.” Faithful pulpit ministry requires the declaration of both judgment and grace. The Word of God is a sharp, two-edged sword that softens and hardens, comforts and afflicts, saves and damns. The preaching of divine wrath serves as a black velvet backdrop that causes the diamond of God’s mercy to shine brighter than ten thousand suns. It is upon the dark canvas of divine wrath that the splendor of His … View Resource

  • What Are Justification and Sanctification? Article by Guy Waters

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2015 | Romans 3

    The words justification and sanctification have largely fallen out of use in Western culture. Sadly, they are also fading from sight in the Christian church. One reason this decline is distressing is that the Bible uses the words justification and sanctification to express the saving work of Christ for sinners. That is to say, both terms lie at the heart of the biblical gospel. So, what does the Bible teach about justification and sanctification? How do they differ from one another? How do they help us understand better the believer’s relationship with Jesus Christ? Justification is as simple as … View Resource

  • Forerunner of the Reformation Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2014 | Romans 5

    John Wycliffe was the morning star of the Reformation. He was a protestant and a reformer more than a century before Martin Luther ignited the Protestant Reformation in 1517. Through Wycliffe, God planted the seeds of the Reformation, He watered the seeds through John Hus, and He brought the flower of the Reformation to bloom through Martin Luther. The seed of the flower of the German Augustinian monk Luther’s 95 theses was planted by the English scholar and churchman John Wycliffe. Wycliffe died on New Year’s Eve, 1384. Three decades later, he was condemned as a heretic. In … View Resource

  • For Us and For Our Salvation Article by David Gibson

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2014 | Romans 5

    The message of salvation is the story of two Adams. “For as by the one man’s disobedience the many were made sinners, so by the one man’s obedience the many will be made righteous” (Rom. 5:19). What the first Adam undid, the second Adam repairs. But who is this second Adam, and what kind of person must He be to do this? Why is He—and only He—able to obey in this way? The Chalcedonian Creed (AD 451) says the purpose of the incarnation was “for us and for our salvation.” The creed is a statement of profound … View Resource

  • Ministry to Grieving Parents Article by Nancy Guthrie

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2014 | Romans 8

    When we witness the anguish, the anger, the questions, the devastation that comes to families that experience the death of a child, we find ourselves desperate to figure out what we can do, what we can say, that will truly help. In the retreats my husband and I host for couples who have faced the death of a child, participants often talk about the ways people have “been there” for them in the midst of the worst pain they can imagine, as well as the ways people have added to their pain. If you could be a fly on the … View Resource

  • The New Heavens and New Earth Article by Dennis Johnson

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2015 | Romans 8

    Right Now Counts Forever. The title of Dr. Sproul’s column in every issue of Tabletalk concisely captures the relationship between the gospel and the new heavens and new earth. The good news of Christ’s sacrificial death and glorious resurrection has eternal ramifications for the destiny of every human being. Your response to that message—whether in humble trust or in defiant unbelief—will be your tipping point between boundless bliss beyond your wildest dreams and unrelenting torment beyond your worst nightmares. The living God, sovereign over every atom in His universe and every nanosecond of its history, is directing the … View Resource

  • Dealing with Doubt Article by Randy Alcorn

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2014 | Romans 10

    In times of doubt, difficulty, and trials, our fundamental beliefs about God and our faith are revealed. So how can Christians find faith in the midst of doubt? How can they trust God’s plan when their lives seem out of His control, and prayers seem to go unanswered or, as it sometimes feels, even unheard? If you or someone you love has been there, these questions may be far more personal than theoretical. You might ask questions like these: Is God good? Is He sovereign? Does He care? When we’re assailed by trials, we need perspective for our … View Resource

  • Ordinary Christian Work Article by Tim Challies

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2014 | Romans 12

    Of the many legacies of the Protestant Reformation, few have had greater and wider-reaching impact than the rediscovery of the biblical understanding of vocation. Before the Reformation, the only people with a vocation or calling were those who were engaged in full-time church work—monks, nuns, or priests. As Gene Veith writes in God at Work: The ordinary occupations of life—being a peasant farmer or kitchen maid, making tools or clothing, being a soldier or even king—were acknowledged as necessary but worldly. Such people could be saved, but they were mired in the world. To serve God fully, to live a … View Resource

  • When You Don’t Feel Like Singing Article by Randall Van Meggelen

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2015 | Romans 12

    Over the past one hundred years, Christians have sung, “I sing because I’m happy, I sing because I’m free” countless times. Despite what one might think about “His Eye Is on the Sparrow,” the hymn rings true in that our joy and freedom in Christ make us want to sing. Yet, sometimes we are not happy and do not feel like singing in corporate worship. It is therefore helpful to consider some aspects of sung praises in order to properly address this feeling. Purpose God saved us to proclaim His praises (1 Peter 2:9). He seeks true … View Resource

  • Reasons for Separation Article by Carl R. Trueman

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2014 | Romans 16

    Separation is a perennially tricky topic in the Christian church. After all, the Bible has much to say about loving neighbors and enemies, teaching that seems to stand at odds with the notion of separating from someone. Furthermore, at the end of a century marked by ethnic conflict and the myriad bloody testimonies to the terrifying results of one group deciding that another group simply does not belong, there are strong cultural forces that militate against notions of separatism. However, lest the reader think I mention these two points just for descriptive purposes, I would add that they are actually … View Resource