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  • The Westminster Shorter Catechism (1647) by Various

    Q1: What is the chief end of man? A1: Man’s chief end is to glorify God, and to enjoy Him for ever.Read More

  • What Is Your Only Comfort? by Kim Riddlebarger

    Of all the Reformation-era catechisms, perhaps none is as well-loved as the Heidelberg Catechism. In the opening question and answer, the personal and distinctive tone of the catechism becomes evident. “What is your only comfort in life and in death?” …Read More

  • What We’ve Received by Keith Mathison

    The Westminster Confession of Faith contains a majestic statement on the authority of Scripture: The authority of the holy Scripture, for which it ought to bebelieved and obeyed, dependeth not upon the testimony of any man, or church; but wholly …Read More

  • Where and How Do We Draw the Line? by Kevin DeYoung

    In essentials, unity. In non-essentials, liberty. In all things, charity.” Sounds nice, but which are which? Everyone wants to be unified in what really matters, to agree to disagree on what isn’t as important, and to exercise love in all …Read More

  • Which Christ? by Burk Parsons

    Christianity is a creedal religion. You cannot separate Christianity from its ancient creeds. In fact, every true Christian adheres to the ancient creeds of the church, whether he knows it or not. We all have creeds. Whether formal or informal—whether …Read More

  • Who Draws the Line? by Sean Michael Lucas

    As Jesus ascended into heaven, He delegated His authority to the Apostles to make disciples: “Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, …Read More

  • Why Creeds and Confessions? by David Hall

    Peter confessed Jesus as the Christ. Jesus responded that His church in all ages would be built upon that realization. The paramount thing confessed was Christ, who is the unique Son of the living God (Matt. 16:16), the cornerstone of …Read More

  • Why Do We Draw the Line? by Carl R. Trueman

    In recent years, talk of uniting around the center has been very popular in conservative evangelical quarters. One obvious reason for this is that many regard such a center as reflecting the fact that there is a solid core of …Read More

  • Why Study Church History? by Jon Payne

    If church history does not get your blood pumping, you had better check your spiritual pulse. The sixteenth century alone provides a treasure of soul-stirring narratives. Think of Martin Luther’s bold and daring stand for the gospel against the destructive …Read More

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