We Will Appear with Christ in Glory

from Apr 14, 2021 Category: Ligonier Resources

The Lord Jesus has so united Himself to His people that when He returns, He will see to it that we are standing at His side in glory. In this brief clip, Sinclair Ferguson describes the incredible privilege of our union with Christ in His exaltation.

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Transcript:

And here, as I said, I think we have perhaps the most panoramic view in the New Testament of what it means for us be united to Jesus Christ. And I want us to think especially, first of all, about what he says in verses 1 through 4 of Colossians 3. Because we’re back to the same principle: You have come to fullness of life in Jesus Christ, first of all, because that has given you a new identity. Now, we’ve explored this under the microscope. You’re united to Christ in His death and resurrection. But you notice, now, Paul stretches this. Just look at his words. He says, “You have been raised with Christ, so seek the things that are above, where Christ is, seated on the right hand of God. Set your minds on things that are above, not on things that are on earth. For you have died, and your life is hidden with Christ in God. And when Christ, who is your life, appears, then you also will appear with Him in glory.” So, now he’s saying, “You’re so united to Christ that you were united to Him in His death, united to Him in His burial, united to Him in His resurrection, united to Him in His ascension. Your life is hidden with Christ in God; you’re united to Him in His heavenly session and reign. And when He appears, He will not reappear without you.” “When He appears”—isn’t this an amazing statement?—“then you also will appear with Him in glory.” The early fathers used to have a lovely way of putting this that the Reformers also echoed: “Our Lord Jesus Christ considers Himself incomplete without us.” Isn’t that something? We’re not worthy of that. In fact, we feel so unworthy of that, there’s something in us that refuses to believe it. How could this possibly be true? But because He has become the second Man and the last Adam, because He’s united us to Himself, He now considers Himself to be incomplete without us. So that, if I can put it this way, He has already said to His Father, “I’m not going back unless they’re coming with Me, to appear with Me with in glory.” And I know this is something that—we don’t think this way naturally. May I repeat that from what we’ve seen before? I understand none of us thinks of ourselves naturally this way. But what Paul is saying is, you’re no longer supposed to think of yourself “naturally” now that you’re a believer. You’ve got to think about yourself biblically, to believe what the gospel provides for you.