• When Not to Take Communion by Anthony Carter

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2015

    When I was growing up, I did not like going to church. For a young boy in a rural town, church was boring, long, and filled with old, stodgy people singing old, stodgy songs. I would have rather been playing …Read More

  • The End of the End by R.C. Sproul Jr.

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2013

    When Alice found herself at a crossroads in Wonderland, she looked about for help. There in a tree nearby was a smile. Just a smile. Soon though, the full body of the Cheshire Cat appeared. Alice asked the cat which …Read More

  • The Kingdom is Now by R.C. Sproul Jr.

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2012

    I am deeply grateful to my Old Testament professor. Though I was young and foolish while in seminary, I have, by God’s grace, been growing less young and less foolish over time. I used to argue with him about …Read More

  • Heresy of the Free Spirit by Kevin DeYoung

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2011

    Marguerite Porete was a French mystic born in the thirteenth century. She was part of the Beguines, a voluntary, informal, semi-monastic community not unlike the new monasticism popping up in some urban centers. Marguerite, though unknown to almost all contemporary …Read More

  • A Supernatural Faith by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2007

    The God hypothesis is no longer necessary to explain the origin of the universe or the development of human life.” This assertion was at the very heart of the movement that took place in the eighteenth century that we …Read More

  • “If I Should Die Before I Wake …” by Harold Brown

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2000

    WHAT HAPPENS TO US AT DEATH? We know what happens to the body, but what happens to the soul? The materialist’s answer is simple: There is no such thing as a soul, so there is no hope of eternal life …Read More

  • The 13th Century by Nicholas Needham

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2013

    More traditionally minded Roman Catholics have seen the thirteenth century as the golden age of Roman Catholic civilization. Certainly it witnessed the papacy achieving the summit of its power over the politics and culture of Western Europe. THE REIGN OF …Read More

  • Calvin as a Controversialist by Cornelius Van Til

    Calvin’s activity as a controversialist began with his “sudden conversion” to the Protestant faith. To become a Protestant was, for Calvin as well as for Luther, to become an Augustinian who tested Augustine’s teaching by Scripture. All controversies …Read More

  • Bubble Gum and the Trinity by Douglas Wilson

    FROM TABLETALK | April 1998

    I recently told a class of tenth-graders that what our culture needed was a return to Trinitarian bubble-gum commercials. They were a little nonplussed, and so I hastened to explain that as individuals with one set of ultimate commitments, we …Read More

  • Degrees of Separation by David Murray

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2014

    One of the most difficult challenges to address in the Christian life is our relationships with other Christians. It’s like walking a tightrope with heavy weights on each end of our pole. On the one side is the biblical …Read More

  • The Frozen Chosen by Guy Richard

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2016

    Most of us are familiar with the phrase the frozen chosen. Many will even have used it on occasion to describe themselves or some other group of Christians or to distinguish one tradition within Christianity from another. But what exactly …Read More

  • Islam Today by James Anderson

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2016

    Whenever I teach on Islam, whether at seminary or in a church, I invariably get asked questions that begin like this: “What would a Muslim think about…?” My standard response is another question: “Which Muslim?” Imagine someone asking a parallel …Read More

  • The Rise of the Papacy by David Wells

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2005

    There are one billion Roman Catholics worldwide, one billion people who are subject to the Pope’s authority. How, one might ask, did all of this happen? The answer, I believe, is far more complex and untidy than Catholics have argued …Read More

  • The State of Theology by Chris Larson

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2016

    Tabletalk: Why did Ligonier do the State of Theology survey? Stephen Nichols: One of the cardinal rules of giving a speech is “Know your audience.” Back in 2014, we partnered with LifeWay Research to conduct a survey of the theological …Read More

  • “The Greatest of All Protestant Heresies”? by Sinclair Ferguson

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2004

    Let us begin with a church history exam question. Cardinal Robert Bellarmine (1542–1621) was a figure not to be taken lightly. He was Pope Clement VIII’s personal theologian and one of the most able figures in the Counter-Reformation movement within …Read More