• The Son Rising in the East by R.C. Sproul Jr.

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2012

    The early church faced at least two distinct and competing enemies. While Jesus walked the earth and after, the great challenge to the kingdom of God was found both in the Roman Empire and in Judaism. An armed force that …Read More

  • Where East Meets West by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2012

    I cannot count the number of times I’ve heard, “I believe there’s a little bad in all that’s good and a little good in all that’s bad.” The problem is not the number of times I …Read More

  • Christ and Culture by Keith Mathison

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2009

    In the first centuries following the death and resurrection of Jesus the Messiah and the inauguration of the new covenant under which the people of God became a trans-national people crossing all borders, the church had few choices in the matter …Read More

  • Cultural Engagement by Russell Moore

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2014

    Early in my ministry, I served as a youth pastor, and like every other evangelical youth minister, I received all the advertisements from youth ministry curriculum-hawkers telling me how I could be “relevant” to “today’s teenagers.” The advertisements promised …Read More

  • Faith Has Its Reasons by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2013

    Christians from every theological tradition have for centuries confessed their faith by reciting the Apostles’ Creed. Elsewhere I have taught on the actual content of this creed, but if there is one aspect of this confession that we often fail …Read More

  • Just How Beautiful Beauty Can Be: An Interview with Andrew Peterson by Andrew Peterson

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2012

    Tabletalk: Please describe your conversion briefly, and tell us how you got into writing music and literature. Andrew Peterson: I grew up in the church, the second son of a preacher man. That implies a lot, and most of what …Read More

  • That Others May Live by Kevin Struyk

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2015

    One of the most elite special operations forces in the United States Air Force is the pararescuemen, often referred to as PJs. These men are responsible for going into hostile territory anywhere in the world and rescuing wounded soldiers at …Read More

  • A Kingdom of Priests by Kelly Kapic

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2015

    In February, a terrible beheading of twenty-one Egyptian Christians took place. They were executed because they were identified as “the people of the cross.” We are reminded of the possibility of martyrdom and the reality that this side of glory …Read More

  • What the Future Holds by Owen Strachan

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2015

    Religion in America takes no direct part in the government of society, but it must be regarded as the first of their political institutions; for if it does not impart a taste for freedom, it facilitates the use of it …Read More

  • Catechisms for the Imagination by N.D. Wilson

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2013

    What are stories for? Ask an average group of young American narrative consumers this question and they most likely won’t know what you mean. What you’ll likely get are blank faces, shrugs. So, let’s get more specific …Read More

  • Heresy of the Free Spirit by Kevin DeYoung

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2011

    Marguerite Porete was a French mystic born in the thirteenth century. She was part of the Beguines, a voluntary, informal, semi-monastic community not unlike the new monasticism popping up in some urban centers. Marguerite, though unknown to almost all contemporary …Read More

  • Taking Captive All Things by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2010

    Not too long ago my family and I were eating at a local restaurant known for its home style southern cuisine and quaint family atmosphere. As we were leaving, I couldn’t help but notice a family sitting together, and …Read More

  • Two Thumbs Down by R.C. Sproul Jr.

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2011

    Neil Postman, in his delightful albeit ominous book Amusing Ourselves to Death, draws an insightful comparison between two important dystopian novels. Utopian novels, of course, are those designed to show us edenic cultures. Dystopian novels show us hellish futures.Read More

  • A Different Kind of Power by John Hutchinson

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2008

    I had just moved to the Washington D.C. area when the call came from a Christian organization on Capitol Hill, asking if I would be the evangelical along with a Jewish rabbi, Roman Catholic priest, and members of Congress in …Read More

  • Confessing Faith by R.C. Sproul Jr.

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2005

    While it may be true that there are two kinds of people in the world, (those who like to divide the world into two kinds of people and those who don’t), there are in turn myriad places to draw these …Read More