• The Moral of the Story by R.C. Sproul Jr.

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2004

    Everybody loves Jesus. Marxists love Jesus, because He was such a radical revolutionary. Unitarians love Jesus, because He befriended the social outcasts. Liberals love Jesus because, well, because He was liberal. Even some conservatives love Jesus, because He was so …Read More

  • At Least I’m Honest by R.C. Sproul Jr.

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2008

    Every culture and subculture has its own taboos. Not all of them are the same, however. Given that we are all human, how can we explain the divergence of cultural standards? Why is it that one culture will find adultery …Read More

  • Breaking Boundaries by Andrew Hoffecker

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2008

    Pluralism has found a home among the people of God. While pluralism — the acceptance of nonbiblical ideas and practices as compatible with biblical faith and life — is not a new phenomenon, its persistence in church history and the pervasiveness of …Read More

  • No Accounting by R.C. Sproul Jr.

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2005

    There’s no accounting for taste. Or to put it another way, the taste has reasons that reason knows not of. We like what we like, and we don’t like having to explain it. Which is why postmodernism fits …Read More

  • A Depraved New World by Gene Edward Veith

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2005

    Sexual immorality is nothing new, of course, as we can tell from the Bible’s warnings against it. What is new is that sexual immorality now has cultural approval. Men and women who had sex without being married to each …Read More

  • The Son Rising in the East by R.C. Sproul Jr.

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2012

    The early church faced at least two distinct and competing enemies. While Jesus walked the earth and after, the great challenge to the kingdom of God was found both in the Roman Empire and in Judaism. An armed force that …Read More

  • Where East Meets West by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2012

    I cannot count the number of times I’ve heard, “I believe there’s a little bad in all that’s good and a little good in all that’s bad.” The problem is not the number of times I …Read More

  • One Flesh by Jay Adams

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2005

    Liberals have a way of renaming things in order to make them acceptable. When former-President Clinton committed adultery he called it a “mistake.” Of course, it was sin. Everyone knows that the words “choice” and “fetus” have been used to …Read More

  • Christ and Culture by Keith Mathison

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2009

    In the first centuries following the death and resurrection of Jesus the Messiah and the inauguration of the new covenant under which the people of God became a trans-national people crossing all borders, the church had few choices in the …Read More

  • Cultural Engagement by Russell Moore

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2014

    Early in my ministry, I served as a youth pastor, and like every other evangelical youth minister, I received all the advertisements from youth ministry curriculum-hawkers telling me how I could be “relevant” to “today’s teenagers.” The advertisements promised …Read More

  • Can Christians ‘Do Business’ with the World? by Robert Rothwell

    In recent decades, a number of prominent Christian organizations and denominations have called for Christians to boycott businesses that are associated in some way with non-Christian ethics. Over the years, these groups have called for boycotts of companies and products …Read More

  • The Glory of Plodding by Kevin DeYoung

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2010

    It’s sexy among young people — my generation — to talk about ditching institutional religion and starting a revolution of real Christ-followers living in real community without the confines of church. Besides being unbiblical, such notions of churchless Christianity are unrealistic …Read More

  • Catechisms for the Imagination by N.D. Wilson

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2013

    What are stories for? Ask an average group of young American narrative consumers this question and they most likely won’t know what you mean. What you’ll likely get are blank faces, shrugs. So, let’s get more specific …Read More

  • Heresy of the Free Spirit by Kevin DeYoung

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2011

    Marguerite Porete was a French mystic born in the thirteenth century. She was part of the Beguines, a voluntary, informal, semi-monastic community not unlike the new monasticism popping up in some urban centers. Marguerite, though unknown to almost all contemporary …Read More