• Won’t You Be My Neighbor? by R.C. Sproul Jr.

    FROM TABLETALK | April 1999

    Yesterday I was in California once, Georgia once, Tennessee three times, and Virginia three times. It was a long day but not an unusual one. The great historian Paul Johnson, in his book Birth of the Modern, devotes a rather …Read More

  • Inside Islam by Abdul Saleeb

    FROM TABLETALK | April 1998

    Although the religion of Islam is more characterized by its focus on the law, or shari’a, Islam also offers a comprehensive system of theology. Muslims often proudly point out that their doctrinal system is internally consistent, simple to understand …Read More

  • Bubble Gum and the Trinity by Douglas Wilson

    FROM TABLETALK | April 1998

    I recently told a class of tenth-graders that what our culture needed was a return to Trinitarian bubble-gum commercials. They were a little nonplussed, and so I hastened to explain that as individuals with one set of ultimate commitments, we …Read More

  • A Bad Moon Rising: The Growth of Islam in the U.S. by Mark Horne

    FROM TABLETALK | April 1998

    Islam is the second largest religion in the world. In 1995 about 1,122,661,000 Muslims inhabited this planet. Count the commas, folks—that’s a billion plus a hundred million. That means of every living person, one in …Read More

  • Songs from Exile by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | April 1997

    In exile the people of Israel faced the question: “How do you sing the Lord’s song in a strange and foreign land?” The question is similar to that faced by contemporary American Christians. Ours is a spiritual exile as …Read More

  • Error and Our Era by Ken Myers

    FROM TABLETALK | April 1994

    Truth is great and will prevail, if left to itself.” Thus asserted Thomas Jefferson, champion of free speech and enemy of established religion. I’m not sure that Jefferson entirely believed that. Jefferson did believe that only an educated, well-informed …Read More

  • Drifting into Heresy by Michael Beates

    FROM TABLETALK | April 1994

    More than 120 years before the American Revolution, the charter of Harvard College was established. But the “Rules and Precepts” of the college adopted in 1646 show that the leaders saw education (and all of life) as an arena in …Read More

  • The Cult of Relevance and the Management of Need by Os Guinness

    FROM TABLETALK | June 1992

    Irony, ironically, is a profoundly biblical theme that does not figure strongly in the thinking of most Christians. Yet no other religion rivals the Christian faith in providing such a foundation for a strong view of irony. Because human unbelief …Read More

  • The Present Hope of the Church by Harry Reeder

    FROM TABLETALK | May 1992

    Is there any HOPE for the church in general? What about your church in particular? While realizing the Scriptures promise a triumphant hope at the return of Christ, is there any present hope for the church as we anticipate the …Read More

  • Adam & Eve Go to College by Stan Oakes

    Few understand the unique influence of the university; few understand that the university is in a grave crisis. Few understand that the consequence of ignoring this crisis is the demise of America as we know it.

    S.E. Kao

    Ten …Read More

  • Church Growth—First Things First by Os Guinness

    FROM TABLETALK | March 1992

    When all is said and done, the church-growth movement will stand or fall by one question: In implementing its vision of church growth, is the church of Christ primarily guided and shaped by its own character and calling—or by …Read More

  • The Politization of Truth: The New Sophism by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | March 1992

    In October of 1991, the American people were riveted to the drama of the Supreme Court nomination of Clarence Thomas. Then, a twist of biting irony took place when Anita Hill emerged with allegations of sexual harassment. After Professor Hill …Read More

  • Church Growth—Weaknesses to Watch by Os Guinness

    FROM TABLETALK | February 1992

    Like many movements, the church-growth movement is a grand mixture of things good, bad, and in-between. After stressing its significance last month, I will not comment further on its good parts—except to say that anything that “goes without saying …Read More