• In Word and Deed by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2005

    We have all heard the saying: “Practice what you preach.” Early in my ministerial training, I became convinced of the importance of the truth that Christians, particularly preachers, should practice what they preach. After several years of working to ensure …Read More

  • A Reformation Before the Reformation by George Grant

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2004

    The fourteenth century was a time of Dickensian paradox. Though it was a calamitous time of war, plague, corruption, and social disintegration, it also enjoyed a surprising number of reforms — which would in time bring renewal and restoration to the …Read More

  • A Testimony of Faithfulness by Sinclair Ferguson

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2004

    Among all the names mentioned in the letter to the Hebrews, only one belongs to a member of the New Testament church. Here are four clues. If you still can’t get the answer, look up Hebrews 13:23. Clue …Read More

  • God Omnipotent Reigns by George Grant

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2004

    Though his story is hardly the stock and trade of most church historians, James A. Garfield (1831–1881) affords us innumerable lessons about character, faith, and public service. Such lessons are especially relevant for us during these final days leading …Read More

  • A Burning and Shining Light by Robert Oliver

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2004

    In the unusual turbulence of the seventeenth century, God, in His goodness, raised up a generation of godly leaders to guide His people. Outstanding among these was the stately and erudite John Owen, who, with God-given wisdom, provided clear leadership …Read More

  • Religion, Politics, and Poetry by George Grant

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2004

    Just as it is generally assumed that religion and politics do not make for particularly pleasant dinner table conversation, it is generally assumed that they do not make for particularly pleasant poetry either. John Milton (b. 1608) sundered both assumptions …Read More

  • Theologian of the Spirit by Sinclair Ferguson

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2004

    The figure of John Owen (1616–1683) towers above — almost head and shoulders above — the galaxy of writers we know collectively as the English Puritans. His theological learning and acumen was unrivalled; his sense of the importance of doctrine for …Read More

  • Theologian of the Word by Carl R. Trueman

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2004

    Given John Owen’s Reformed, orthodox convictions, it should not be surprising to learn that he had a high view both of theology and biblical exegesis. Indeed, he regarded the two as intimately related: theology is the result of careful …Read More

  • Urgency and Patience by George Grant

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2004

    Again and again the Scriptures underline the importance of each moment that passes. It is an ethical imperative to act and act quickly when lives are at stake, when justice is perverted, when truth is in jeopardy, when mercy is …Read More

  • Contra Mundum by Ken Jones

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2004

    As illustrated in other articles in this issue, the fourth century was a very interesting time in the history of the church. Having undergone a great deal of persecution as a despised religion in the eyes of Rome, the conversion …Read More

  • Church History in Christ by George Grant

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2004

    By the end of the eighteenth century, the church of Geneva had become a mere shadow of its former glory. The pulpit of John Calvin no longer thundered with the bold truths of the Protestant Reformation. It no longer broadcast …Read More

  • Objective Cultural Norms by George Grant

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2004

    For Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832), the principle of “all things to all men” was not a moral warrant for upholding cultural relativism. Instead, it was a practical mandate for upholding cultural norms. It was for him an inducement to communicate …Read More

  • A Life of Integrity by George Grant

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2004

    He was one of the most important English writers of the eighteenth century. Samuel Johnson (1709-1784) ranks right up with William Shakespeare and G.K. Chesterton as among the most quoted prose stylists in the English language. Indeed, it has …Read More

  • Not of this World by George Grant

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2004

    By almost any modern definition, Jan Comenius (1592–1670) was anything but a success. Though Herman Bavink called him “the greatest figure of the second generation of reformers” he is practically forgotten today. Though Andrew Bonar said he was “the …Read More