Topics

  • What Is Your Only Comfort? by Kim Riddlebarger

    Of all the Reformation-era catechisms, perhaps none is as well-loved as the Heidelberg Catechism. In the opening question and answer, the personal and distinctive tone of the catechism becomes evident. “What is your only comfort in life and in death?” …Read More

  • The Canons of Dordt by R. Scott Clark

    Everyone knows the acronym TULIP, but not everyone knows where this acronym comes from. The Canons of Dordt are among the most famous but unread deliverances of any Reformed Synod. The canons are more than five letters. The canons teach a …Read More

  • The Heidelberg Catechism by Lyle Bierma

    Q. What is your only comfort in life and in death? A. That I am not my own but belong — body and soul, in life and in death — to my faithful Savior
    Jesus Christ.  These are the …Read More

  • The Belgic Confession by Cornelis Venema

    The Belgic Confession is one of the best known and most loved of the Reformed confessions. Philip Schaff, the venerable historian of the church and her confessions, observes that it is “upon the whole, the best symbolical statement of the …Read More

  • Norma Normata by R.C. Sproul

    The Latin word credo means simply “I believe.” It represents the first word of the Apostles’ Creed. Throughout church history it has been necessary for the church to adopt and embrace creedal statements to clarify the Christian faith and to …Read More

  • Confessionally Challenged by Burk Parsons

    One dutchman, a theologian. Two dutchmen, a church. Three dutchmen, a schism — or so the saying goes. Though such a saying could rightly include Englishmen or Frenchmen, historically the Dutch have demonstrated their fervent tenacity for defining the truth, …Read More

  • Where Is Your Treasure? by John Petersen

    As I was flipping through the television channels recently, I was overwhelmed to see how secularism is influencing our culture today, particularly through advertising. In the teaching series Christian Worldview, Dr. Sproul describes secularism as that which looks at reality …Read More

  • The Most Frightening Words by Tom Ascol

    As Jesus draws His Sermon on the Mount to a close, He makes one of the most frightening statements to be found in Scripture. Martyn Lloyd-Jones calls His declaration the most solemn and solemnizing words ever uttered in this world. “Not …Read More

  • Put Off and Put On by Jerry Bridges

    One of the principles of Christian growth is called the “put off and put on” principle (see Eph. 4:22–24). Behind the principle lies the fact that there are always sinful attitudes and actions we need to put off, and there …Read More

  • Be Ye Perfect by Joel Beeke

    In Matthew 5:33–48, Jesus tells us how we are to fulfill the law — not legalistically, but in a spirit of Christ-like love. The goal is that we might strive to obey His final admonition in verse 48: “Be ye …Read More

Topics