The Unholy Pursuit of God in Moby Dick

from Aug 09, 2011 Category: Tabletalk Magazine

Here is a unique title for a Tabletalk article: “The Unholy Pursuit of God in Moby Dick.” This is the title of R.C. Sproul’s contribution to the August issue. It begins like this:

It seems that every time a writer picks up a pen or turns on his word processor to compose a literary work of fiction, deep in his bosom resides the hope that somehow he will create the Great American Novel. Too late. That feat has already been accomplished and is as far out of reach for new novelists as is Joe DiMaggio’s fifty-six-game hitting streak or Pete Rose’s record of cumulative career hits for a rookie baseball player. The Great American Novel was written more than a hundred and fifty years ago by Herman Melville. This novel, the one that has been unsurpassed by any other, is Moby Dick.

My personal copy of Moby Dick is a leather-bound collector’s edition produced by Easton Press under the rubric “The Hundred Greatest Books Ever Written.”

Note that the claim here is not that Moby Dick is one of the hundred greatest books written in English, but rather that it is one of the hundred greatest books written in any language.

Keep reading “The Unholy Pursuit of God in Moby Dick.”