Walk with Luther. 500 Years to the Day.

Faith Alone

 

It’s 1520. Martin Luther has been declared a heretic by Pope Leo X, and his books are being burned. How much longer before Luther himself is thrown into the fire?

Enter the dramatic story at the dawn of the Reformation with Luther: In Real Time. Each episode is released 500 years to the day after the events described, allowing you to walk in Martin Luther’s footsteps from his heresy charges to his famous stand for God’s Word. Share this podcast with people of all ages so they can hear—in Luther’s own words—what Protestants are protesting and why it still matters today.

The first episode is available now.


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“Condemned. Reprobated. Rejected.” A monk by the name of Martin Luther has been declared a heretic by Pope Leo X. Luther is left with a choice: will he recant his teachings or stand alone for the truth? Subscribe now to ensure that you can hear each episode exactly 500 years after every twist and turn.

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When Can I Listen?

This podcast was created to give you a real-time experience of Martin Luther’s journey to the Diet of Worms. In other words, each episode is released on the 500th anniversary of an important moment in Luther’s life. This means that new episodes will be released on varying days of the week, although you can expect to hear a new episode every week beginning October 10. The best way of staying up to date and being notified of new episodes is by subscribing to the podcast.


Who Was Martin Luther?

Would God receive me if I died now? Caught in the open during a thunderstorm, Luther was plagued with fear. Lightning struck the ground nearby and, at that moment, he made a promise: if God allowed him to survive, he would dedicate his life to becoming a monk. Luther’s survival, however, brought nearly fifteen years of self-inflicted torture as he attempted to make himself right before God. As he continued studying the Bible, he realized that it was impossible to do so of his own accord. He needed to be justified by faith in Christ alone, not by good works. When Luther realized this, he felt a newfound freedom and began proclaiming this truth to the masses. His bold proclamation directly opposed the Roman Catholic Church—and thus, he was declared a heretic deserving of the fires of hell. This is Martin Luther—the German monk whose valiant preaching would help restore the true, pure gospel in a time of rampant corruption.


About the Presenter

Barry Cooper is a British author and screenwriter who was educated at Oxford University and Trinity Evangelical Divinity School. He is supervising producer at Ligonier Ministries and host of the Simply Put podcast. His other work includes Luther, Puritan, The Church, Can I Really Trust The Bible?, Discipleship Explored, and (as co-writer) Christianity Explored, a series that has so far been used in 100 countries, and translated into 50 languages.


About the Writer

Douglas Bond

Douglas Bond is tutor for the Oxford Creative Writing Master Class and adjunct instructor in church history at Western Reformed Seminary in Tacoma, Wash. He is also a conference speaker and author of numerous books, including The Mighty Weakness of John Knox.


For Further Study


Luther: In Real Time contains the actual words of the people involved, translated from the original languages in which they spoke or wrote. In each episode of the podcast, “sanctified imagination” has been used to illuminate the life, times, and teaching of Martin Luther. For example, Luther’s view of the doctrine of transubstantiation is given in one episode. The precise context in which Luther expresses or discusses his theological views is not always recorded for us in the historical documents, so in this episode, we hear Luther voicing his views to Philip Melanchthon while walking beside the Elbe River. Even where imagination is used in this way, care has been taken to capture the views of those involved accurately and in their own words.