• Blessed Are the Reviled Article by Donny Friederichsen

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2017

    The professor’s face was contorted with anger as he yelled and shook a fistful of torn paper in my face. He accused me of harassing and attacking university students. What egregious act had I committed? I had properly posted an approved sign on a bulletin board advertising a campuswide outreach that my student ministry was sponsoring. I was stunned. I had never been the recipient of such harsh accusations. At first I wanted to hide. Then I remembered that this man’s contention was not ultimately with me, but with Christ. As I walked away, I felt a light joy because … View Resource

  • Desiring Contentment Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2015

    God has put eternity in our hearts. He has inscribed heaven on our souls. He created us to long for a perfect world and to desire what is supremely ideal. We want to be fully and finally free from the suffering and misery of this world, and ultimately from our sin—not only the conviction and sadness our sin brings us, but also the hurt and pain it brings to those closest to us. As redeemed but fallen creatures in this fallen world, we desperately want to be done with sin and its consequences. We want to be less proud, less … View Resource

  • Finding Contentment Article by Melissa Kruger

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2015

    From our earliest years, we place a variety of personal qualifications on our contentment. If only we could possess that new toy, get into the right peer group, gain acceptance to a particular college, find job satisfaction, marry the person of our dreams, buy just the right home in just the right city, have children, experience lovely vacations, maintain our health, enjoy financial stability—then, and only then, can we expect to experience contentment. If we can just have the items we long for at any time, then we expect to find satisfaction. It’s not too much to ask, is it? … View Resource

  • Having and Wanting Article by Jon Payne

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2015

    A mentor of mine once remarked, “It’s OK to have nice things; it’s not OK for nice things to have you.” While helpful, this counsel fails to satisfy the niggling questions that Christians routinely have concerning wealth and possessions. Is there a limit to how much a Christian should own? Is it sinful for an affluent person to desire more earthly possessions when blessed with an abundance already? What instruction, wisdom, and warnings does God’s Word provide concerning temporal riches? This article is an attempt to answer these and other vexing questions, as we seek to foster a biblical view … View Resource

  • Our New Affection Article by Sinclair Ferguson

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2015

    In 2004, Rolling Stone magazine listed “The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.” At the top was Bob Dylan’s “Like a Rolling Stone.” Second on the list (presuming no bias in the choices made by the magazine) came the Rolling Stones’ “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction.” This song, both in its intended sense and even when pruned of its innuendo, has served as the anthem of the past half-century (it was released in 1965). It therefore comes as no surprise that USA Today reports that the majority of Americans, in every age group, feel that they have never discovered their … View Resource

  • Providence and Contentment Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2015

    Blaise Pascal, the famous French philosopher and mathematician, noted that human beings are creatures of profound paradox. We’re capable of both deep misery and tremendous grandeur, often at the same time. All we have to do is scan the headlines to see that this is the case. How often do celebrities who have done great good through philanthropy get caught up in scandals? Human grandeur is found in part in our ability to contemplate ourselves, to reflect upon our origins, our destiny, and our place in the universe. Yet, such contemplation has a negative side, and that is its potential … View Resource

  • You Shall Not Covet Article by Jason Helopoulos

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2015

    Many individuals are like the rich young man when Jesus said to him, “You shall not murder, You shall not commit adultery, You shall not steal, You shall not bear false witness, Honor your father and mother, and You shall love your neighbor as yourself” (Matt. 19:18–19). They likewise readily reply, “All these I have kept” (v. 20). A person may rationalize that he has never murdered, committed adultery, or stolen—however untrue that claim may be. However, no person in his right mind would say he has never coveted. The last of the Ten Commandments, “You shall not covet,” stands … View Resource

  • The Rhythm of Life Article by Edward Welch

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2015 | Colossians 3

    Sometimes work seems futile and miserable; sometimes we might not have work; and sometimes we might not want work. In other words, there are times when there is no rhythm to our vocational life but only monotonous and persistent dreariness. We don’t expect that any one answer will reboot us into a more normal rhythm, one in which our cycle includes both rest that is restorative and times of enthusiasm for our work. But we do anticipate being able to unload some of that dreariness. Imagine vocational ennui as an accumulation of unnecessary weights. Work can, indeed, be burdensome. We … View Resource

  • The Secret to a Happy Life Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2014 | James 4

    James is sometimes called the “New Testament book of Proverbs.” That’s because of passages such as James 4 that give us a series of loosely linked aphorisms of practical, godly wisdom. This chapter begins with our universal concern about conflict: What causes quarrels and what causes fights among you? Is it not this, that your passions are at war within you? You desire and do not have, so you murder. You covet and cannot obtain, so you fight and quarrel. You do not have, because you do not ask. You ask and do not receive, because you ask wrongly, to … View Resource

  • Discontentment Article by Jared Wilson

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2011

    Dearest Murktooth, We are happy to charge you with the present task for your assigned patient. We are happy because it is a rather easy task, evidence of your still remedial aptitude for temptations, which is itself evidence of your patient’s lack of growth. Your stagnation is your success, then, as it is so often in the infernal arts. The task before you is this: stimulate discontent in your patient. This task is easy for not a few reasons, perhaps the chief of which is that you will have so much help from the sweet cacophony of messages from the … View Resource