• The Mortification of Addictions Article by Jeremy Pierre

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2016

    I used to serve as the deacon of grounds at our church, and weeds were my worst enemies. Weeds are the bullies of the domestic plant world. They steal the precious resources needed for growth from your grass and flowers, and they make no apologies about it. So, they must die. A yardman accepts this duty, and he makes his plan. But not all weeds are created equal, and not all will die with the same efforts. Some are small enough to pull up with your hands. Some require a hand tool. Others take even heavier implements such as shovels, … View Resource

  • The Fall of a Believer Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2014

    We may live in a culture that believes everyone will be saved, that we are “justified by death” and all you need to do to go to heaven is die, but God’s Word certainly doesn’t give us the luxury of believing that. Any quick and honest reading of the New Testament shows that the Apostles were convinced that nobody can go to heaven unless they believe in Christ alone for their salvation (John 14:6; Rom. 10:9–10). Historically, evangelical Christians have largely agreed on this point. Where they have differed has been on the matter of the security of salvation. People … View Resource

  • Our Ancient Foe Article by Keith Mathison

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2011

    Talk of the Devil and spiritual warfare makes some people roll their eyes. We live in an age of particle accelerators, microchips, and organ transplants. The Devil? Why, he’s nothing more than a medieval superstition created to scare naughty children. We can’t take any of that seriously. Martin Luther would have disagreed. He took it very seriously and wrote often of his ongoing battle with the Devil. He was very aware of the forces of evil. Most of us have heard the story about Luther throwing an inkwell at the Devil. Whether truth or legend, such an act would not … View Resource

  • Restraining Sin: The Civil Use of the Law Article by David VanDrunen

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2011

    Of the three uses of the law, the so-called “civil” use may strike us as the least interesting theologically. It involves no inward transformation of the heart or Spirit-wrought righteousness that is pleasing in God’s sight. By this use, the law restrains the sinful excesses of sinners through the fear of shame and punishment, promoting an external obedience to moral standards and a measure of peace in society. It may be hard to get excited about this civil use of the law in comparison to the pedagogical use, which exposes people’s unrighteousness and drives them to repent of their sins … View Resource

  • Anxiety Article by Chris Larson

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2011

    Dearest Oriax, What?! You’re worried because your subject is worried? You seem to think that his fretful concern and persistent questioning will lead him to find answers with the enemy. Let us reassure you that such is rarely the outcome. The more these humans wallow in gnawing uncertainty and narrow-mindedness, the more they will come to resemble our cowering condition instead of patient confidence in the enemy’s will. They call it “anxiety,” and you would think it’s a virtue they cultivate as often as possible. Lest they repent and grow closer to the enemy, do not let them understand anxiety … View Resource

  • Hyper-Criticism Article by Robert Rothwell

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2011

    Our Accusing Apprentice, We are encouraged at how discouraged you seem by your inability to get your subject to renounce her allegiance to the name that terrifies even us. Our joy, however, is not in your displeasure, even if your suffering chills our heart. No, your discouragement gladdens us, for we can now show you the right approach to make this woman a weapon against the kingdom that we oppose. Having watched her for many years, her life convinces us that she is no goat in sheep’s clothing, and we will never pry her loose from her commander’s hand. But … View Resource

  • Not Protesting Evil Article by Gene Edward Veith

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2011

    Dear Eligos, We tempters have a job that is both easy and difficult. Thanks to our fearless leader’s victory in the garden some time ago, human beings are ridiculously, even comically, susceptible to sinning. And yet, sin itself is so ugly, so grotesque, so repellent — if it is only seen clearly (no offense to any of our colleagues) — that humans cannot help but hate it. This means that when we tempt someone to do evil, we are under the humiliating necessity to portray it as something good. This requires creating a certain mindset. A human sees someone else, … View Resource

  • Resisting the Devil Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2011

    The nineteenth century French poet Charles Baudelaire wrote that “the devil’s best trick is to persuade you that he doesn’t exist.” In the providence of God, the Devil has been quite successful in persuading his followers that he doesn’t exist. But we who are followers of the Lord Jesus Christ know all too well that he does, indeed, exist, as we wrestle daily against our enemy and the rulers, authorities, cosmic powers, and spiritual forces of evil (Eph. 6:12). Interestingly, and according to God’s sovereign plan, the god of this world has blinded the minds of unbelievers so that they … View Resource