• The Development of the Bible: An Interview with Michael Kruger Article by Michael Kruger

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2016

    Tabletalk: As president of a Reformed seminary, what do you consider to be the greatest spiritual challenges that future pastors face in the United States and in the world? How can they prepare for those challenges? Michael Kruger: In prior generations, pastors have been repeatedly told that theology and doctrine don’t really matter and that they should just focus on running their ministries and shepherding the flock. However, the last few years of decline in America have shown that our theological convictions really do matter. The only pastors (and churches) who have been able to withstand the cultural onslaught … View Resource

  • Eating Flesh, Drinking Blood Article by Brian Vickers

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2015

    Difficult words, no doubt. No less for John’s readers than for Jesus’ hearers. For many that day, it was too much, so they walked away. Just the day before, Jesus fed five thousand people from five loaves of bread and two fish (John 6:1–14). Once they were well fed, having enjoyed the benefits of Jesus’ miracle, the people concluded, “This is indeed the Prophet who is to come into the world,” and they decided that He should be king (vv. 14–15). What a difference a day makes. Truly, truly, I say to you, unless you eat the flesh … View Resource

  • Hidden from the Wise Article by Erik Raymond

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2015

    If we sit back in our chair and honestly contemplate the scope of the church, we find ourselves somewhat bewildered. It is clear that God’s agenda in and through the church is to showcase His manifold wisdom: “so that through the church the manifold wisdom of God might now be made known to the rulers and authorities in the heavenly places” (Eph. 3:10). At the same time, there are many people with tremendous influence and ability who are not believers. Do you ever wonder why God has chosen to pass by some with so much “promise” only to … View Resource

  • Not One Jot or Tittle Article by Brandon Crowe

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2015

    Matthew 5:17–18 is a key text for interpreting the Sermon on the Mount and the entire gospel of Matthew: Do not think that I have come to abolish the Law or the Prophets; I have not come to abolish them but to fulfill them. For truly, I say to you, until heaven and earth pass away, not an iota, not a dot, will pass from the Law until all is accomplished. Here Jesus says that not one iota (jot) or dot (tittle) will pass away from the law. These most likely refer to the smallest strokes of the Hebrew … View Resource

  • The Perspicuity of Scripture Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2015

    One of the most important but often most overlooked parts of our order of service at Saint Andrew’s Chapel is the prayer of illumination. In our liturgy, the prayer of illumination is situated between the reading of Scripture and the sermon. In our prayer, we humbly ask God to illumine His Word to us by the Holy Spirit so that we would rightly hear, understand, and apply what the Lord is saying to us in His Word. The reason it is one of the most important elements of our service is because we desperately need the Holy Spirit to … View Resource

  • The History of Study Bibles Article by Stephen Nichols

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2015

    In 1560, an exiled group of pastors and theologians made history. They published the first full edition of the Geneva Bible. It was a remarkable feat on many fronts. These scholars who worked on the Geneva Bible had been leaders of the Reformation in England and Scotland. When “Bloody Mary” took the throne, she threw into reverse the advancing Reformation, taking the nation back to Roman Catholicism. Britain’s Reformers found themselves in prison, martyred, or in exile. Many went to Calvin’s Geneva. Calvin wasn’t much for idle hands. Florentine jewelers who had converted to Protestantism were also … View Resource

  • Study Bibles and the Great Commission Article by John MacArthur

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2015

    A stranger noticed I was carrying a study Bible and remarked, “That’s an odd title.” He was pointing at the spine of my Bible. I stood speechless for a brief moment, trying to figure out what he meant. “It’s not the word Bible,” he continued. “I get that. But all the Bibles I have ever seen say, ‘Holy Bible.’ I understand what that means. The word study in the title of a Bible doesn’t make sense to me.” I explained that it is a Bible with explanatory notes to help readers understand the words, ideas, context, and … View Resource

  • Study Bibles as Theological Tool Kits Article by Justin Taylor

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2015

    When the Apostle Paul wrote to his young friend and pastoral protégé Timothy, he gave him a clear command about how to handle the Scriptures: “Do your best to present yourself to God as one approved, a worker who has no need to be ashamed, rightly handling the word of truth” (2 Tim. 2:15). We may draw several implications from this brief exhortation. First, handling God’s Word takes effort and skill. Timothy is to be a “worker,” doing his “best”—that is, striving by the Spirit to deploy careful excellence—as he undertakes this sacred task. Second, though … View Resource

  • Study Bibles for Our Hearts, Homes, and Churches Article by Joel Beeke

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2015

    Study Bibles are hardly new inventions. The medieval Glossa Ordinaria on the Latin Vulgate, Martin Luther’s prefaces and marginal notes in his German translation, and the Geneva Bible testify that for centuries, people have sought to combine the text of Scripture with words of explanation or other helps for the reader. Today, many people read study Bibles at home and carry them to church. Is this good or bad? It depends on how we use them. How Not to Use Study Bibles Do not read study Bibles upside down. Study Bibles typically feature the text of Scripture on the … View Resource

  • Study Bibles in the Church Article by Victor Cruz

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2015

    When I was young in the Christian faith, I was asked to teach a Bible study every Saturday night for my church’s youth group. I felt honored, but at the same time I was terrified since I had never actually completed reading the entire Bible and did not have a clear idea about what to teach from Scripture. My first impulse was to find different topics that I thought were important to Christians, so I started looking for passages in the Bible that would teach about love, justice, forgiveness, salvation, and so on. It was a lot of work … View Resource

  • Study Bibles: Soli Deo Gloria Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2015

    I was preaching at a church in Bogotá, Colombia, in 2007. The church met in an old warehouse, and although the congregation was rather large, it was quite poor. After my sermon, I met with several pastors from around Bogotá who gathered to discuss gospel ministry in Colombia. The pastors were interested in knowing more about Reformed theology and how they could begin to teach it in their churches. At one point in our discussion, one of the pastors took his Bible and placed it on the table in front of me. I was pleasantly surprised to see that it … View Resource

  • Why a Study Bible? Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2015

    The editors of Tabletalk asked me to speak about study Bibles and what drove Ligonier Ministries, in particular, to publish a thoroughly revised and updated version of the Reformation Study Bible. I’m glad to take up this task, as I continue to believe that a good study Bible is one of the most important tools for helping people grow in the things of God. Another article this month will deal with the history of study Bibles, so I won’t go into detail on that specific subject. However, I do want to point out that our efforts to produce … View Resource

  • Defining Our Terms Article by Kevin Gardner

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2015

    The doctrine of Scripture is foundational to the Christain faith. But there is more to say about Scripture than simply, “The Bible says it. I believe it. That settles it.” If you don’t grasp what the Bible is and how it came to be, you’ll never fully grasp its meaning. Since the meaning of the Bible is vitally important to our faith and life, we will here briefly define a few key terms that relate to the doctrine of Scripture as the study of God’s Word written. Authority: The power the Bible possesses, having been issued from … View Resource

  • How We Got Here Article by Stephen Nichols

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2015

    If you read church history, you have seen it all. That’s not entirely hyperbole. Many of the challenges and questions we face in the church today have been met by past generations of believers. Did not a wise man once say, “There is nothing new under the sun”? This holds true regarding the doctrine of inerrancy. In 1979, Jack B. Rogers and Donald McKim wrote a book titled The Authority and Interpretation of the Bible: …An Historical Approach. The central idea or thesis has come to be known as the Rogers/McKim proposal, which is this: The Bible is … View Resource

  • Just Me And My Bible? Article by Terry Johnson

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2015

    Roman Catholic theology is noted for the emphasis it puts on tradition, which is placed alongside Scripture as an equally authoritative stream of revelation. The Reformers rightly rejected this view and emphasized sola Scriptura as the church’s only infallible authority. But is there a place for tradition in the Reformed faith? John Murray, the former professor of systematic theology at Westminster Theological Seminary, once spoke to this question: There is a Reformed tradition. It is enshrined in the Reformed creeds, theology, worship, and practice. We believe it is the purest representation and expression of Apostolic Christianity. It is in … View Resource