• Signature in the Cell Article by Keith Mathison

    In 1991, Phillip Johnson published Darwin on Trial. In 1996, Michael Behe published Darwin’s Black Box. In 1998, William Dembski published The Design Inference. While numerous other books on the subject have been published, these three books are considered landmark works in the discussion over intelligent design. Now there is a fourth. Stephen C. Meyer’s new book, Signature in the Cell, may be the most persuasive case for intelligent design yet published. The timing could not be better, since 2009 is the 200th anniversary of Darwin’s birth and the 150th anniversary of the publication of On … View Resource

  • The Christian and Science (Part 1) Article by R.C. Sproul

    What is the Christian’s role in the scientific enterprise? How do we as Christians live in a culture that has been shaped and influenced by the impact of scientific accomplishments? Lest we slip into critical attitudes toward science, we must remember that science began with a mandate God gave in creation. God commanded Adam and Eve to have dominion over the earth and to subdue it. There is a sense in which man was created to conquer the universe in which he lives. The scientific enterprise is a part of that task. At the same time, certain restrictions and constraints … View Resource

  • The Christian and Science (Part 2) Article by R.C. Sproul

    (Continued from The Christian and Science pt. 1) Is Aquinas to Blame? Many Protestant scholars venture earlier into church history and lay the blame for this division at the feet of Saint Thomas Aquinas. Among Protestant thinkers, there seems to be a kind of allergy to the work of Aquinas. Francis Schaeffer, for example, is one who would lay much of the blame for today’s schizophrenic view on Aquinas. Schaeffer argued that the root of modern man’s trauma lies in the separation that Aquinas made between the realms of nature and grace. The realm of nature is the daily … View Resource

  • The Christian and Science (Part 3) Article by R.C. Sproul

    (Continued from The Christian and Science pt. 2)  Christians Need Not Fear Scientific Inquiry There is a sense in which the Christian should be the most passionate scientist of all because he should be rigorously open to truth wherever it is found. He should not be afraid that a new discovery of something that is true will destroy his foundation for truth. If our foundation for truth is true, all other truth can only support it and enhance it. It can’t destroy it. Therefore, Christians ought not to be afraid of scientific inquiry. This does not mean that … View Resource

  • Taking Thought for Tomorrow Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | April 1999

    I’m too busy enjoying summer to think about winer,” the grasshopper told the the ant. —from the Grasshopper and the Ant, by Aseop MY FATHER’S FAVORITE BIBLE VERSE was Jesus’ admonition in the Sermon on the Mount, “Take no thought for tomorrow, what ye shall eat or what ye shall drink.…” He never tired of quoting this text to me when I was a boy. Yet my father did take thought for the future. He bought life insurance, fire insurance, health insurance, etc. He also had a savings account. He preached a philosophy of delayed gratification. With my weekly allowance, … View Resource