• For God So Loved the World Article by R. Scott Clark

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2004

    To many, the topics of common grace and atonement would seem to be mutually exclusive, as if we should either hold to common grace or to definite atonement, but not to both. There are, however, good biblical and theological reasons for holding both the Reformed doctrines of common grace and definite atonement. By common grace I do not mean that God has endowed all humans with a universal gift whereby, if they will, they may do what is necessary to obtain salvation. Rather, using the formula adopted by the Christian Reformed Churches in 1924, “common grace” means three things: First, … View Resource

  • A Loving Provision Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2004

    In recent years, we have been treated to the invention of a word previously unknown, or at least not used. That word that has entered into the general vocabulary of our time is the word oxymoron. A typical example of an oxymoron might be the phrase “jumbo shrimp.” The words that are used to describe a particular thing seem to be self-contradictory, or at least standing in an antithetical relationship. From this perspective, one might say that in theology the phrase “common grace” is such an oxymoron. I say this for this reason: God’s grace can never be reduced … View Resource

  • Of the Father’s Love Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2004

    As I write this article, I am reminded of the December 15, 2003 issue of the Orlando Sentinel. “CAPTURED,” read the front-page headline, “feared dictator found alone in rat-infested hole.” With sincere wonder, Iā€ˆremember gazing into the eyes of the worn and unkempt former Iraqi leader, asking myself: “Does God love this man — does He actually love Saddam Hussein?” In responding to this question, some might retort, “No way, not a chance — how dare you ask such a question!” However, others might say, “Of course God loves him, God loves everyone — how dare you ask such … View Resource

  • Obedient Unto Death Article by Nicholas Needham

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2004

    Passive” is not a complimentary word to apply to someone these days. It suggests an inert, sluggish, withdrawn soul that is lost in daydreams. So perhaps it sounds like a contradiction to speak of “passive obedience.” How can obedience be passive? I suppose if someone in authority commands you to be inert, sluggish, withdrawn, and lost in daydreams, then your passivity will be an act of obedience — although we are now descending into wild paradox with our talk of a “passive act”! The passive obedience of Christ, however, doesn’t involve these contradictions and paradoxes. The word “passive” here suggests … View Resource

  • Redemption Planned Article by Don Kistler

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2004

    In Reformed circles, we hear much about the covenants. We are a people who place our trust in God’s covenant faithfulness. We hear about the covenant of grace and the covenant of works, but we hear very little about the covenant of redemption. We also hear much about the saving work of Christ, but give little thought to the fact that the triune God conceived the work that the second person of the Trinity would do that would save sinners. Simply stated, the covenant of redemption is a covenant God the Father made with God the Son before the foundation … View Resource