• The New Jerusalem Article by S.M. Baugh

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2013

    The book of Revelation is a visionary tapestry woven from threads drawn from all of Scripture, giving us a unique view into the Lord’s grand purpose for us: to glorify Him and enjoy Him forever. Before we turn to the New Jerusalem passage in Revelation 21:9–22:5, we need to look at two foundational issues. The first thing to recognize is that Revelation is prophecy (Rev. 1:3; 22:7, 10, 18–19). This means that visions and dreams are to be expected here because symbolic visions are the normal mode of communication through a prophet (see Num. 12 … View Resource

  • Interpreting Revelation Article by Cornelis Venema

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2012

    The interpretation of the book of Revelation has often proven difficult throughout the history of the Christian church. Though it is little more than a piece of scholarly gossip, some have even suggested that the Reformer John Calvin, one of the best interpreters of the Scriptures the church has known, shied away from writing a commentary on the book of Revelation for this very reason. There is no evidence to support this claim, and we do have Calvin’s commentary on the book of Daniel, which gives a fairly clear picture as to how Calvin would have interpreted the book of … View Resource

  • Revelation for All Time Article by Kim Riddlebarger

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2011

    The book of Revelation is the last book in the Bible and completes the New Testament canon. It is Jesus Christ’s final word to His church. This easily overlooked fact suggests that Revelation is one of the most practical and important of the New Testament epistles. Likely written near the end of the first century, Revelation comes in the form of a circular letter addressed to seven churches in Asia Minor. But it is much more than a mere letter. This book is prophetic in content (describing the course of human history in highly symbolic terms) and apocalyptic in style … View Resource

  • Seven Applications of Revelation Article by Dennis Johnson

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2012

    Why did God give us the book of Revelation? If you had asked me this question when I was a young Christian, I might have said, “To help us discover when Jesus will return to earth,” “To help us make sense of events in the Middle East,” “To give us nightmares about the tribulation so that we don’t get lax and miss the rapture,” “To give Christians something to argue about,” or, simply, “To confuse us.” My answer today is different: God gave the Apocalypse shown to John in order to bless us — to … View Resource

  • Understanding John’s Prophecy Article by Keith Mathison

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2012

    Winston Churchill once described the Soviet Union as “a riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma.” I believe it would be fair to say that many Christians look at the book of Revelation in a similar way. “How,” they ask, “are we to understand a book that is filled with so much bizarre imagery — a lamb with seven eyes and seven horns, locusts with the appearance of horses, a woman clothed with the sun, a great red dragon, and a multi-headed beast? The book is incomprehensible, right?” Well, no. But understanding Revelation does take some … View Resource

  • That the Scriptures Might Be Fulfilled Article by John Piper

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2011

    The glory of Jesus Christ shines more clearly when we see Him in His proper relation to the Old Testament. He has a magnificent relation to all that was written. It is not surprising that this is the case, because He is called the Word of God incarnate (John 1:14). Would not the Word of God incarnate be the sum and consummation of the Word of God written? Consider these summary statements and the texts that support them. 1. All the Scriptures bear witness to Christ. Moses wrote about Christ (John 5:39, 46). 2. All the Scriptures are … View Resource

  • The Suffering Servant and Conquering King Article by Alec Motyer

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2011

    John the Baptist was the last of the “Old Testament” prophets, and his message — “Repent, for the kingdom of heaven is at hand” — tells us in a nutshell what the task of the prophets was and how they went about it. Their task was to speak the word God had given them; their objective was a message relevant to their contemporaries; and their method included news of coming events so that people might be forewarned and forearmed. So John said “repent” (a message for the present), and also predicted (“the kingdom is at hand”), so that in the … View Resource

  • Sovereign Restoration Article by Kim Riddlebarger

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2010

    In one of the least known books of the Bible, Zephaniah, we find one of the most amazing prophecies. Writing during the reign of King Josiah (640–609 BC), Zephaniah speaks of the coming day of the Lord (Zeph. 1:7): “Be silent before the Lord God! For the day of the Lord is near; the Lord has prepared a sacrifice and consecrated his guests.” This is that day on which the Lord will reward those who have obeyed Him, as well as mete out judgment upon those who have sinned against Him. After speaking of the future conversion of … View Resource

  • At Many Times; In Many Ways Article by Keith Mathison

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2008

    It is probably not an exaggeration to say that most Christians have little difficulty reading the Five Books of Moses and the Historical Books of the Old Testament. Sure, we may scratch our heads in puzzlement while reading certain sections of Leviticus, but all in all, these books do not pose too much of a problem for us. They contain a narrative, a story with a beginning and end. In these books, we are on familiar ground. The poetic books are a bit more challenging because of the way in which they are written, but we still find them somewhat … View Resource

  • Telling the Truth Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2008

    Nearly forty years ago, in his book The Church at the End of the 20th Century, Francis A. Schaeffer penned the following: “Does the church have a future in our generation? …I believe the church is in real danger. It is in for a rough day. We are facing present pressures and a present and future manipulation which will be so overwhelming in the days to come that they will make the battles of the last forty years look like child’s play.” During the past forty years, the church has seen many rough days, and I would venture to … View Resource