• Enlightenment Article by J. Nelson Jennings

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2012

    Many Westerners’ impressions of Eastern spirituality have been shaped by gazing at puzzling statues of Buddha or by hearing George Harrison sing “My Sweet Lord” to Krishna. Those impressions can range from something unproductive to plain weird to strangely attractive and fashionable. By “Eastern spirituality,” we basically mean Hinduism and Buddhism. However, both of these traditions are extremely diverse and hard to describe. Hinduism is a folk religion that developed in the Indian subcontinent long ago. Buddhism is an offshoot of Hinduism and has sprouted numerous branches in its twenty-five-hundred-year history. “Enlightenment” is the shared goal of Hinduism and Buddhism … View Resource

  • Philosophical Taoism Article by Michael Gleghorn

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2012

    Philosophical Taoism, often represented by the yin-yang symbol, originated in China with the teacher Lao Tzu (604–517 BC ). Although we do not know much about his life, he left his teachings behind for posterity in a brief work called Tao Te Ching, that is, “The Way and Its Power/Virtue.” The term Tao is typically translated as “way” or “path.” The chief goal of philosophical Taoism is to conserve life’s vitality by not expending it in the useless ways of friction and conflict. One does this by living in harmony with the Tao (way) of all things: the way … View Resource

  • Wisdom and Knowledge Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2012

    In college, I majored in philosophy. On the very first day of the very first course that I took in philosophy, the professor wrote the word philosophy on the chalkboard, then broke it down to show its etymological origin. The word comes from two Greek words, which is appropriate, for the Greeks are usually seen as the founding fathers of Western philosophy. The prefix philo comes from the Greek word phileĊ, which means “to love.” The root comes from the Greek word sophia, which means “wisdom.” So, the simple meaning of the term philosophy is “love of wisdom … View Resource

  • Social Darwinism Article by Gene Edward Veith

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2009

      Charles Darwin’s theory of evolution was never just about biology. Nor were its consequences just about religion. Rather, the origins and effects of Darwinism were largely cultural and moral. Darwin’s Origin of Species was published in 1859, which was at the height of the Industrial Revolution and the Capitalist Revolution. The dynamic free market economy, characterized by intense competition in which weak companies went broke and the strong companies thrived, had brought unparalleled economic and technological progress. It was a small step to speculate that animal species compete and progress in a similar way. What Darwin did was to … View Resource

  • Only One Way Article by Bruce Ware

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2008

    Three positions abound today on the question of whether Christ is the only way to salvation. All three can be detected by how each answers these two fundamental questions: First, is Jesus the only Savior? More fully: Is the sinless life of Christ and His atoning death and resurrection the only means by which the penalty of sin is paid and the power of sin defeated? Second, is faith in Christ necessary to be saved? More fully: Is conscious knowledge of Christ’s death and resurrection for sin and explicit faith in Christ necessary for anyone to become a recipient of … View Resource

  • Twilight of the Idols Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2008

    The nineteenth-century philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche is famous for his declaration that “God is dead.” That brief dictum does not give the whole story. According to Nietzsche, the cause of the Deity’s demise was compassion. He said, “God is dead; He died of pity.” But before the God who was the God of Judeo-Christianity perished, Nietzsche said that there were a multitude of deities who existed, such as those who resided on Mount Olympus. That is, at one time there was a plurality of gods. All of the rest of the gods perished when one day the Jewish God … View Resource

  • The Salvation of Knowledge Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2005

    The postmodern era is coming to an end, and a new age is beginning. In this new era, pluralism is considered simplistic and elementary. Whereas pure relativism was the reigning mind-set in the postmodern era, in this new age, conceptualism has become the accepted system by which we determine what we know and what we believe. As far as I know, conceptualism has not been formulated by any philosophers or sociologists, but can be defined, at least in the way I conceptualize it, as that system of thought by which an individual, or a society, determines reality based upon his … View Resource

  • The Origin of the Soul Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | June 1992

    Students of philosophy are well aware of the watershed significance of Immanuel Kant’s epochal work, The Critique of Pure Reason. In this volume Kant gave a comprehensive critique of the traditional arguments for the existence of God, wrecking havoc on natural theology and classical apologetics. Kant ended in agnosticism with respect to God, arguing that God cannot be known either by rational deduction or by empirical investigation. He assigned God to the “noumenal world,” a realm impenetrable by reason or by sense perception. The impact on apologetics and metaphysical speculation of Kant’s work has been keenly felt. What … View Resource