• Who is God? Article by David Kenyon

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2015 | Exodus 33

    Moses said to the Lord, “Please show me your glory” (Ex. 33:18). In effect, he asked, “Who are you, God?” God responded with these words: “I will make all my goodness pass before you and will proclaim before you my name ‘The LORD.’ And I will be gracious to whom I will be gracious, and will show mercy on whom I will show mercy” (v. 19). He promised to reveal Himself. But no man can see God and live. That is too much for any man—sinful man in particular. God told him to stand on the rock and said … View Resource

  • Immanuel Article by Gerald Bilkes

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2013

    Immanuel is one of Christ’s most precious names. It is a combination of two Hebrew words that together mean “God with us.” The gospel of Matthew explains that Christ received this name in fulfillment of Old Testament prophecy. For many people, the name Immanuel has a nice ring to it that suggests comfort and hope in times of trouble. Yet there is a lot more substance and significance to this name. The encouragement Christians can take from this name is no mere vague impression or passing emotion. The truth conveyed by this name has both a glorious beauty and … View Resource

  • Marley and His Message to Scrooge Article by R.C. Sproul

    Bah! Humbug!” These two words are instantly associated with Charles Dickens’ immortal fictional anti-hero, Ebenezer Scrooge. Scrooge was the prototype of the Grinch who stole Christmas, the paradigm of all men cynical. We all recognize that Ebenezer Scrooge was a mean person - stingy, insensitive, selfish, and unkind. What we often miss in our understanding of his character is that he was preeminently profane. “Bah! Humbug!” was his Victorian use of profanity. Not that any modern editor would feel the need to delete Scrooge’s expletives. His language is not the standard currency of cursing. But it was profane in that Scrooge … View Resource

  • Christmas According to the Angels (Part 3 of 3) Article by R. Fowler White

    In this final part of our three-part series on Christmas according to the Angels, we contemplate the truth that the birth announcements of the angels celebrated “glory to God” and “peace for man.” Consider first that the angels celebrated “glory to God” (Luke 2:14) in their birth announcements for Jesus. In those words, what did the angels tell us but that in Jesus the full weight of “the Godness of God,” the perfections and excellencies of God, has been revealed? In Jesus, “all the fullness of God was pleased to dwell” (Col 1:19). In other words, in Jesus, the “beauty … View Resource

  • Christmas According to the Angels (Part 2 of 3) Article by R. Fowler White

    In our first installment in this series, we learned that the Gospel birth announcements of the angels brought “good news of great joy” to those humbled by sin, suffering, and death. In this our second installment, we focus on two more truths: 1) the birth announcements of the angels were sent to “all the people” (Luke 2:10) and 2) those birth announcements spoke of Jesus’ person and work. Let’s look more closely at each of these points. View Resource

  • Christmas According to the Angels (Part 1 of 3) Article by R. Fowler White

    Other than the Holy Spirit, they are the most pivotal players in the drama that we know as the Christmas story; they are the most pivotal players in the accounts God gave us about the birth of Jesus our Lord. Matthew the Evangelist tells us that it was one of them who brought the announcement of the upcoming birth to Joseph. Luke the Evangelist tells us that it was one of them who brought the announcement of the upcoming birth to Mary. And Luke again tells us that it was a host of them who brought the birth announcement to … View Resource

  • Christmas According to the Apostle Paul - Gal 4:4-5 (Part 3 of 3) Article by R. Fowler White

    Galatians 4

    In the two previous installment in our series on Gal 4:4-5, we have learned four features of the Apostle’s answer to the question, what Child is this who was born at Christmas? We have focused on the Child as the heart of history, on two circumstances of His birth, and on the purpose of His coming. In this final installment we learn two more features of Christmas according to Paul. View Resource

  • Christmas According to the Apostle Paul - Gal 4:4-5 (Part 2 of 3) Article by R. Fowler White

    Galatians 4

    In our first installment in this series on Christmas according to Paul, we learned that, for the Apostle, Jesus is the Child for whom all of time had waited and who was born of a woman. In the second part of our series, we learn two more truths about Christmas from Paul as he writes in Gal 4:4-5. View Resource

  • Christmas According to the Apostle Paul - Gal 4:4-5 (Part 1 of 3) Article by R. Fowler White

    Galatians 4

    One of the most beloved carols that Christians sing during the Christmas season is that of William C. Dix, What Child is This? As few other carols do, the lyrics of this selection prompt us to contemplate the identity, the person and work, of the Babe in the manger. In fact, the carol politely but persistently presses us to answer the question: is this Child truly a holy infant or a mere holiday infant? View Resource

  • His Glory Is Our Story Article by John Sartelle

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2010

    And the Word became flesh and dwelt among us, and we have seen his glory, glory as of the only Son from the Father, full of grace and truth” (John 1:14). I love being on a high mountain, on a tall building, or in a plane looking down on where I act out my daily routine, looking dow n on my house, neighborhood, and city. Such a panorama gives me a new perspective on my existence. Remember the first time you saw a view of the earth from a satellite, one of those marvelous pictures taken from space? Before … View Resource

  • The Big Picture Article by Robert Reymond

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2009

    Since my article is appearing in this issue of Tabletalk magazine, I have a great opportunity to tell you young folk of the next generation about a pet peeve of mine with my generation when it comes to the reason for celebrating Christmas. Many people, as you know, celebrate not much more than “roasting chestnuts by an open fire, Jack Frost nipping at their noses.” But Christians surely know enough to know that Christmas means more than that. It surely has something to do with Jesus, doesn’t it? But what? This month a lot of sermons will be preached … View Resource

  • Bringing Christ Into the Problem Article by Gene Edward Veith

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2006

    Charles Darwin finally gave up his belief in God not because he discovered evidence for evolution by natural selection (a theory he developed some years earlier) but because of his anguish at the death of his ten-year-old daughter. When he published The Origin of Species in 1859, he purported to prove that the world itself did not need God, an act of vengeance against the God whom He insisted did not exist. The problem of evil is not just a philosophical or even a theological problem. It is concrete, personal, sometimes irrational. Many people cannot conceive of a loving, all … View Resource

  • Dimness or Fidelity? Article by Albert Mohler

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2005

    With December 25 fast approaching, the secular media are sure to turn their interest once again to the virgin birth. Every Christmas, weekly news magazines and various editorialists engage in a collective gasp that so many Americans could believe such an unscientific, supernatural doctrine. For some, the belief that Jesus Christ was born of a virgin is nothing less than evidence of intellectual dimness. One writer for the New York Times put the lament plainly: “The faith in the Virgin Birth reflects the way American Christianity is becoming less intellectual and more mystical over time.” Does belief in the … View Resource

  • The Suffering Servant Article by Donald Macleod

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2005

    John Murray, with good reason, argues that obedience is the most inclusive concept available to us for describing the redeeming work of Christ (Redemption Accomplished and Applied, p. 19). Other categories such as sacrifice and satisfaction cover some of the data, but obedience is by far the most comprehensive. It is also, of course, utterly biblical. Christ came pre-eminently as the Servant, in fulfillment of Isaiah’s prophecy (especially Isa. 52:13–53:12). In accordance with this, He saw Himself as one who had come not to do His own will, but the will of the Father who had sent Him … View Resource

  • In the Fullness of Time Article by David Holwerda

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2005

    The Christmas season is filled with excitement and joy — and busyness. Retail stores have lengthened the season because successful sales and happy shoppers are critical for the economic success of many. In the church, the Advent season lasts four weeks. This is a time to remember God’s coming to us and to wait in hopes of His coming again. We must be careful lest our hectic schedules filled with shopping, parties, and other special events leave no time for the purpose of Advent. Advent is not about us filling our time full but rather about taking time to remember … View Resource