• Dealing with Disappointment Article by Deepak Reju

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2017

    I sat across from a husband who expressed disillusionment about his spouse and his marriage. I’ll spare you the details, but essentially he said: “I need this. She’s not giving it to me. I’m unhappy. Why won’t she give it to me?” What you are missing, that I can’t give you in my writing, is the dejection in his voice. You’ve been there, haven’t you? Something doesn’t go as expected. You’re frustrated. Your family, job, friendships, marriage, church—they’re not what you hoped for. How do you as a Christian deal with disappointment? START WITH THE HEART Disappointment often reveals what … View Resource

  • How to Pray for Your Pastor Article by Melton Duncan

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2017

    When Roman legions invaded Caledonia (modern-day Scotland) in the late first century AD, it was said by the historian Tacitus that the powerful Celtic chieftain Calgacus emerged and rallied his tribes against the might of Rome, famously declaring, “They make a desert, and they call it peace.” Today’s Christian pastor is likewise making similar stands for biblical Christianity in the midst of a secular desert created by an anti-Christian culture. The Bible describes a faithful pastor as an elder who oversees the flock and the household of God. According to Paul, pastor/elders rule the church (Titus 1:5) and guard the … View Resource

  • Blessed Are the Peacemakers Article by Dirk Naves

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2017

    Most of us want peace. Very few of us are willing to make it. If we breeze through the Beatitudes, we might mistake peacemaking for a passive quality, one possessed by people who mind their own business. Their virtue is found primarily in avoiding conflict. But that is certainly not Jesus’ intended teaching. A peacemaker does not avoid conflict. A peacemaker engages conflict—not to inflame it, but to resolve it. A peacemaker is one whose posture is primarily active; relentless in the pursuit of justice, harmony, repentance, and reconciliation. The life of Jesus, the supreme peacemaker, reveals how difficult and … View Resource

  • The Violent Take It by Force Article by David Briones

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2015

    Jesus said, “From the days of John the Baptist until now the kingdom of heaven has suffered violence, and the violent take it by force” (Matt. 11:12). Two questions have left readers scratching their heads: first, what is meant by the kingdom’s suffering violence, and, second, who takes the kingdom by force? To gain some clarity on this issue, let’s start with the second question and work our way back to the first. Who are “the violent” who “take [the kingdom] by force”? The word translated “the violent” always carries a negative connotation. It therefore cannot describe … View Resource

  • Instead of Worrying Article by Tim Witmer

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2015

    What? Me Worry?” Those of us who are old enough remember Alfred E. Neumann’s mindless approach to worry. Similarly, Bobby McFerrin’s smash hit “Don’t Worry Be Happy” resonated with millions of people who just hoped that it could be that easy. It isn’t. All of us wrestle with anxiety. After all, there are lots of things to worry about: money, health, family, career—you can fill in the rest. One of the more popular approaches to addressing worry these days is the suggestion to set aside a thirty-minute period of time to do your worrying. Have you ever tried this? It … View Resource

  • All Things Well Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2015

    Back before electronic calendars and smartphones, many of us used something called a Day-Timer. I got my first professional Day-Timer when I joined the staff of a church at nineteen years old. And though I haven’t used a Day-Timer in more than a decade, I recently came across an old one, and when I opened it I was immediately drawn to the words that I wrote on the front page of my calendar: “The busy man is a lazy man.” From my first Day-Timer to my last, I wrote those words on the front page so that every time I … View Resource

  • Contending for Peace and Purity Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2014 | Ephesians 4

    I spent my first year of college at a second-degree separatist school that was founded by the Bible Presbyterian Church. The men who founded the college were colleagues of Carl MacIntyre, Allan MacRae, J. Gresham Machen, and Bob Jones Jr. These stalwarts of the faith fought for the fundamentals of the faith against the rising tide of liberalism for a good portion of the twentieth century. My professors had been their students, and I am grateful to God to have been one of theirs. They were thoroughgoing fundamentalists—staunchly committed to the fundamentals of the faith, the authority and inerrancy of … View Resource

  • The Comfort of Jesus’ Prayers Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2014 | John 17

    As an ordained minister, I’ve had experience going to the Scriptures with a number of people in order to help them see what God has to say about many diƒfferent subjects. Over the years, one of the most common questions that I’ve been asked has to do with the meaning of Christ’s work for the security of the believer’s salvation. The New Testament gives us many categories for understanding that those who are truly saved will persevere. There is the category of justification, which tells us that we have received the imputation of Christ’s righteousness through faith in Him alone … View Resource

  • Rest and the Gospel Article by Chan Kilgore

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2013

    John Calvin is often quoted as saying, “From birth, our hearts are idol factories.” We hit this planet in pursuit of the created, searching for what can be found only in the Creator. When I ask people how they are doing, they often reply, “busy.” We define ourselves by what we do rather than by what Christ has done. The result is that we are weary and restless. We need more than just a day off. I find myself coming back from a week’s vacation needing a vacation from my vacation. A day (or week) off is not enough to … View Resource

  • Praying for Politicians Article by David Robertson

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2013

    Having been a minister for twenty-six years and an editor of a church magazine for some of that time, I can safely say that there is no subject more likely to get you into controversy than the troubled relationship of the gospel to politics, unless you dare to touch the modern-day idol of people’s children. So when I was asked to write this column, my heart sank; I knew the heresy antennas of many would already be raised. To make matters worse, I write this just after the re-election of President Obama, a result that caused many of my American … View Resource

  • Dividing Walls That Unite Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2012

    Be not ashamed of your faith; remember it is the ancient gospel of the martyrs, confessors, reformers and saints. Above all, it is the truth of God, against which the gates of Hell cannot prevail. Let your lives adorn your faith, let your example adorn your creed.” These words from C.H. Spurgeon’s foreword to the Second London Baptist Confession of Faith are as poignant now as in 1855. As the church at the beginning of the twenty-first century, we desperately need to return to our historic creeds and confessions, and we need to remember the ancient gospel of our forefathers … View Resource

  • Consider the Glory of God Article by Sinclair Ferguson

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2012

    John Newton (1725–1807) is best known today for his great hymns (including “Amazing Grace” and “Glorious Things of Thee Are Spoken”). But in his own day, he was perhaps more highly prized as a letter writer — “the great director of souls through the post,” as someone described him. Such was the value of his correspondence that he published several volumes of his letters (including one of his letters to his wife, which called forth the comment by one reviewer, his friend Richard Cecil, that wives would be in raptures reading such love letters while “we [husbands] may suffer loss … View Resource

  • Consider Yourself Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2012

    Controversy exists because God’s truth exists in a world of lies. Controversy is the plight of sinners in a fallen world, who were originally created by God to know the truth, love the truth, and proclaim the truth. We cannot escape controversy this side of heaven, nor should we seek to. As Christians, God has rescued us out of darkness and has made us able to stand in His marvelous light. He has called us to go into the darkness and shine as a light to the world, reflecting the glorious light of our Lord, Jesus Christ. And when light … View Resource

  • Why Controversy is Sometimes Necessary Article by Albert Mohler

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2012

    I recently watched as a young mother acted quickly and decisively to end a squabble among two preschool boys. She acted righteously and quite effectively, and then she turned to her two charges and set down the law: “It is never right to fight.” Sorry, Mom, I understand what you were trying to do, but that moral instruction will not serve those boys well as they grow into maturity. Their challenge will be to learn when it is right to fight, and how, as the Bible commands, to fight the good fight of faith. What about the church? Is it … View Resource

  • The Secret of Contentment Article by William Barcley

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2012

    Contentment is one of the most difficult Christian virtues to attain. Almost four hundred years ago, Jeremiah Burroughs referred to the “rare jewel” of Christian contentment. It is safe to say that contentment is no more common in our day than it was in Burroughs’. Yet, it remains one of the most crucial virtues. A contented Christian is the one who best knows God’s sovereignty and rests in it. A contented Christian trusts God, is pure in heart, and is the one most willing to be used of God—however God sees fit. We live in a world that breeds discontent. … View Resource