• The Ark of the Covenant Article by Nicholas Batzig

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2011

    It seems that every year a new children’s story Bible comes out. The captivating artwork often makes the biblical stories come alive. There is one picture in a particular story Bi ble our family has that my two-and-a-half-year-old, Elijah, loves more than others. It is a picture of a flame coming down on the altar the prophet Elijah built for God. There was a time when my son refused to go to bed until he saw this picture. Every night he would say: “Fire! Fire! Show me the fire.” While the Israelites did not have children’s story Bibles filled with … View Resource

  • Our Bloody Religion Article by Anthony Carter

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2011

    It has been said that Christianity is a bloody religion. This reference is usually made by critics who point to the wars, inquisitions, trials, and executions carried out over the years in the name of Christianity. While we must admit that blood has been wrongly shed in the name of so-called christianity, the fact of the matter is that Christianity is indeed a bloody religion. However, this is true not because of the blood shed by humanity in wars and inquisitions, but because of the blood shed by Jesus Christ. In the preface to the book Precious Blood, Richard Phillips … View Resource

  • The Lamb of God Article by Derek Thomas

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2006

    And Abraham went and took the ram and offered it up as a burnt offering instead of his son” (Gen. 22:13). Like an old-fashioned grammar text, the Bible is a book in which many of the answers to questions posed early on are to be found in the back of the book. Take the idea that Jesus died for me. We sing Cecil Frances Alexander’s words: We may not know, we cannot tell What pains he had to bear; But we believe it was for us He hung and suffered there. And we sing these words because they reflect something … View Resource

  • For God So Loved the World Article by Tom Ascol

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2005

    Every Christian believes in limited atonement. That may sound ludicrous to my Arminian friends because it has long been assumed that only Calvinists hold to the dreaded “L” in TULIP. But if the death of Jesus Christ is recognized as an actual atonement (and not merely a potential one), then the question of limitation cannot be escaped, unless you believe the lie of universalism. It is the recognition that Christ’s death actually atoned for sins that governs our interpretation of those wonderful texts that speak of the great breadth of His saving work. For example, John writes that Jesus is … View Resource

  • Death Conquered Article by John Hill

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2004

    In his letter to the Romans, Paul teaches us that all have sinned, then he reveals the wages of sin — death! Death for sin — isn’t that a little harsh? We don’t like to think about such things. Maybe there is something we can do to appease God? Can sinners atone for their own sins, or do we need someone else to atone for our sins in order for us to be reconciled to God? Can we save ourselves from death or do we need someone to save us? In answering these questions, Dr. W. G. T. Shedd provides … View Resource