• Which Laws Apply? Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2017

    To this day, the question of the role of the law of God in the Christian life provokes much debate and discussion. This is one of those points where we can learn much from our forebears, and John Calvin’s classic treatment of the law in his Institutes of the Christian Religion is particularly helpful. Calvin’s instruction comes down to us in what he calls the threefold use of the law with respect to its relevance to the new covenant. The law, in its first use, reveals the character of God, and that’s valuable to any believer at any time. But … View Resource

  • The Importance of Theology Article by Michael Allen

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2017

    Systematic theology” is a label with admittedly clinical connotations. It conjures a picture of the theologian as someone who takes in hand the living Word of God only to dissect and dismember the body of biblical truth into various pieces so that he might label (often in Latin!) and arrange those pieces in categories of his own meticulous devising. Though such a connotation of systematic theology is not uncommon in popular Christian culture, it does not represent what most Christian theologians have intended by the label. Far from attempting to divide the seamless garment of biblical truth, systematic theology considers … View Resource

  • What Should We Remember? Article by Scott Redd

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2016

    Memory of the past—whether corporate or individual—can wield a powerful influence not only in how people engage the present but also in how they face the future. As a matter of fact, it is not surprising that for some people, memory is thought of as a heavy burden that connects them to the abuses, traumas, and failures of their past. For others, however, memory can provide deep encouragement about where they have been and what experiences and relationships have formed them into who they are today. In Scripture, memory has a similar formative power. The Bible depicts believers as being … View Resource

  • Why Remember? Article by J. Reid

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2016

    Sometimes I like to ask my boys if God can do anything. By now, they understand enough theology to answer that God can do anything He wants to do, or that God can never act against His character. The immutability of God according to His unchanging character is good news for the people of God. If God were not immutable or if God could lie, remembering the God of the past would hold little significance for the believer in the twenty-first century. God would be just another capricious deity and the life of faith would be little more than a … View Resource

  • The Goodness of God Article by Eric Alexander

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2016

    Many years ago, my wife and I were on our summer holiday. At church on Sunday morning, we met a friend whom we had known as a student. He was a bachelor, and we took him to lunch. As we talked, he confided in us that he had recently been diagnosed with a serious cancer. Before we parted, he told us that he had already made some tentative plans for the future. “If God is good,” he began, “I may be able to retire early, and live not far from here.” Unfortunately, he had to hurry away. All I had … View Resource

  • God Article by John Piper

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2016

    Have you ever asked why God’s forgiveness is of any value? Or what about eternal life? Have you ever asked why you want eternal life? These questions matter because it is possible to want forgiveness and eternal life for reasons that may well indicate that you don’t have them. Take forgiveness, for example. You might want God’s forgiveness because you are so miserable with guilt feelings. You just want relief. If you can believe that He forgives you, you will have some relief, but not necessarily salvation. If you want forgiveness only because of emotional relief, you won’t have God’s … View Resource

  • General Revelation Article by W. Robert Godfrey

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2016

    Nothing is more important than knowing God as He truly is. For this reason, the church has confessed many truths about our God throughout history. God is the eternal Trinity, the almighty Creator, the wise Sustainer, the effective Redeemer, and the coming Judge. One truth not so clearly articulated in our creeds is that God is the trustworthy Revealer. To know God as He is, He must reveal Himself to us. Because God is infinite, He cannot be fully comprehended by finite creatures. We are blinded to God’s truth by our sin. But even before sin entered the world, we … View Resource

  • The Reformed Doctrine of God Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2015

    Over the years, I’ve had opportunities to teach systematic theology in a variety of settings, from seminary classrooms to university courses to Sunday school classes in the local church. But no matter where I’ve taught systematics, the first place I typically start is the doctrine of God. Theology, of course, studies God and His character and ways, so it’s appropriate to begin with a look at His nature and attributes before examining what the Bible has to say about redemption, the church, the last things, and the other categories of systematic theology. Whenever I’ve taught the doctrine of God, I’ve … View Resource

  • How Much Should I Study Doctrine? Article by Jen Wilkin

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2015

    I stumbled onto Reformed theology as a bleary-eyed new mom. During an inductive study of the book of romans, I began to detect that I had been quite a bit more dead in my sins than the church of my upbringing had taught. concerned that this insight might be the product of sleep deprivation rather than spirit-wrought inspiration, I began searching for doctrine that confirmed or denied what I was seeing. My husband took note of my burgeoning interest and gave me Louis Berkhof’s Systematic Theology for my thirtieth birthday. From there, it was a straight shot to seminary. Except … View Resource

  • Who is God? Article by David Kenyon

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2015 | Exodus 33:18-34:7

    Moses said to the Lord, “Please show me your glory” (Ex. 33:18). In effect, he asked, “Who are you, God?” God responded with these words: “I will make all my goodness pass before you and will proclaim before you my name ‘The LORD.’ And I will be gracious to whom I will be gracious, and will show mercy on whom I will show mercy” (v. 19). He promised to reveal Himself. But no man can see God and live. That is too much for any man—sinful man in particular. God told him to stand on the rock and said, “While … View Resource

  • Our Beautiful God Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2014 | 1 Chronicles 16:29

    I’ve always found it interesting that the Bible often makes reference to the beautiful. In fact, if you took the time to look up every reference to “beauty” or every reference to “the beautiful” in a concordance, you would see that the word beauty in one form or another occurs frequently in the pages of sacred Scripture, particularly in the Old Testament. First Chronicles 16:29 is one of the places where we read of beauty: “Give to the Lord the glory due His name; Bring an offering, and come before Him. Oh, worship the Lord in the beauty of holiness!” … View Resource

  • The Holy Love of God Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2014 | 1 John 4:7-11

    Long ago, Augustine of Hippo pointed out that the desire of every human heart is to experience a love that is transcendent. Regrettably for us today, however, I don’t think there’s any word in the English language that’s been more stripped of the depth of its meaning than the word love. Due to the shallow romanticism of secular culture, we tend to view the love of God in the same way popular music, art, and literature view love. Yet the Bible says God’s love is far different—and greater. First John 4:7-11 gives us this classic statement with respect to … View Resource

  • Asking, Seeking, Knocking Article by Eric Alexander

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2014 | Matthew 7

    There must be few pastors who have not repeated the words of the Apostle Paul in Galatians 5:7, with a wistfulness equal to his: “You were running well. Who hindered you?” The Apostolic finger had touched upon the timeless tragedy of a life that showed early spiritual promise yet was blighted by a lack of perseverance. It is, of course, the same sad story as Jesus told in the parable of the sower, when He describes the one who “hears the word and immediately receives it with joy, yet he has no root in himself, but endures for a while” … View Resource

  • For the Glory of God Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2014

    At the church I co-pastor, Saint Andrew’s Chapel in Sanford, Florida, we are deliberate about making sure that both our church members and visitors understand the doctrinal basis of our fellowship. As a small way of helping to further that end, we note in our church bulletin every Sunday morning that “we affirm the solas of the Protestant Reformation.” By way of reminder, the five solas are five points that summarize the biblical theology recovered and proclaimed during the Protestant Reformation. As we note in our bulletin, these five solas are: Sola Scriptura: The Bible is the sole written divine … View Resource

  • Delighting in the Trinity Article by Michael Reeves

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2014

    It is not to be expected that we should love God supremely if we have not known him to be more desirable than all other things.” So wrote the great hymn writer Isaac Watts. And of course, he was quite right, for we always love what seems most attractive to us. Whether it be God, money, sex, or fame, we live for and love what captures our hearts. But what kind of God could outstrip the attractions of all other things? Could any unitary, single-person god do so? Hardly, or at least not for long. Single-person gods must, by definition, … View Resource