• Is God Unjust? Article by Jared Oliphint

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2017

    The phrase must have looped over and over in Adam’s mind aftˆer he took his first bite of the forbidden fruit. “In the day that you eat of it you shall surely die” (Gen. 2:17). This was the day he ate of it, so this was the day he would surely die. I can’t imagine the terror Adam felt as he stitched together a few fig leaves for make-shiftˆ clothes. Adam was now on borrowed time before his inevitable punishment. Judgment day had come.  While God introduced earthly justice that day, He also restrained His judgment’s full weight and granted … View Resource

  • God Never Forgets Us Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2016

    We are a forgetful people. We too often overlook the majesty of creation and how it directs our gaze to our sovereign, holy, and gracious Creator. We forget to give God glory for creating us and for sustaining us. We forget to thank Him for all blessings. We forget to pray to Him, and we forget to praise Him. We forget His steadfast and abounding love. We forget what Christ has done for us, in us, and through us. We forget Christ’s law-fulfilling life, and we forget His sacrificial, atoning death. We forget His resurrection, and we forget that we … View Resource

  • Reformed Theology & John 3:16 Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2016

    We see it everywhere. From bumper stickers to billboards, from T-shirts to tattoos, from old faded church signs to spray-painted signs along country roads—John 3:16 is everywhere. As such, some Christians have become complacent about the simple truth of John 3:16: “For God so loved the world, that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life.” Some think it’s just for children, some think it’s too elementary, and some perhaps think it’s doctrinally beneath them to spend time studying such a simple verse in depth. But in John 3:16 we find … View Resource

  • True Conversion Article by Steven Lawson

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2016

    Jesus said, “Unless you are converted and become like children, you will not enter the kingdom of heaven” (Matt. 18:3). Jesus is clear that if a person of this world is to be accepted into this other kingdom—the kingdom of heaven—he must be converted. Put very simply, to be converted is absolutely necessary to enter the kingdom of God. What does the word conversion mean? In the biblical sense, conversion means a turning—a spiritual turning away from sin in repentance and to Christ in faith. It is a dramatic turning away from one path in order to pursue an entirely … View Resource

  • Church Splits Article by Tom Ascol

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2015 | John 17:11-23

    When an atom is split, its overall mass is reduced and a tremendous amount of energy is released. The results, graphically demonstrated by the two atomic bombs that ended World War II, can be massively destructive, with effects that linger for generations. The reactions that result from atom splits have their counterparts in the spiritual realm with church splits. When a congregation experiences division, the consequences are often devastating, widespread, and long lasting. The sinful severing of relationships always breeds betrayal and disillusionment. In a church, where members relate to each other as interdependent components of one body (Rom. 12:5; … View Resource

  • What is the Gospel? Article by Ray Ortlund

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2015 | Romans 1

    The great nineteenth-century Princeton theologian Charles Hodge said, “The gospel is so simple that small children can understand it, and it is so profound that studies by the wisest theologians will never exhaust its riches.” The gospel is absolutely fundamental to everything we believe. It is at the very core of who we are as Christians. However, many professing Christians struggle to answer the question: What is the gospel? When I teach, I am astounded by how many of my students are unable to provide a biblically accurate explanation of what the gospel is, and, what’s more, what the gospel … View Resource

  • For Us and For Our Salvation Article by David Gibson

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2014 | Romans 5:19

    The message of salvation is the story of two Adams. “For as by the one man’s disobedience the many were made sinners, so by the one man’s obedience the many will be made righteous” (Rom. 5:19). What the first Adam undid, the second Adam repairs. But who is this second Adam, and what kind of person must He be to do this? Why is He—and only He—able to obey in this way? The Chalcedonian Creed (AD 451) says the purpose of the incarnation was “for us and for our salvation.” The creed is a statement of profound truths about the … View Resource

  • The Pillar of the Truth Article by Steve Timmis

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2014 | 1 Timothy 3

    At first reading, 1 Timothy 3:15 seems somewhat disconcerting. In it, Paul is explaining to Timothy why he is writing to him. It concerns the church: “I hope to come to you soon, but I am writing these things to you so that, if I delay, you may know how one ought to behave in the household of God, which is the church of the living God, a pillar and buttress of the truth.” Did you catch what he wrote? “The church … a pillar and buttress of the truth.” As sound evangelicals, we know that Paul has … View Resource

  • The Disappearance of Hell Article by John MacArthur

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2014

    According to recent polls, some 81 percent of adult Americans believe in heaven, and fully 80 percent expect to go there when they die. By comparison, about 61 percent believe in hell, but less than 1 percent think it’s likely they will go there. In other words, a slight majority of Americans still believe hell exists, but genuine fear of hell is almost nonexistent. Even the most conservative evangelicals don’t seem to take hell very seriously anymore. For decades, many evangelicals have downplayed inconvenient biblical truths, neglecting any theme that seems to require somber reflection. Doctrines such as human depravity, … View Resource

  • Preaching the Wrath of God Article by Steven Lawson

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2014 | Romans 3

    The Genevan Reformer John Calvin said, “Preaching is the public exposition of Scripture by the man sent from God, in which God Himself is present in judgment and in grace.” Faithful pulpit ministry requires the declaration of both judgment and grace. The Word of God is a sharp, two-edged sword that softens and hardens, comforts and afflicts, saves and damns. The preaching of divine wrath serves as a black velvet backdrop that causes the diamond of God’s mercy to shine brighter than ten thousand suns. It is upon the dark canvas of divine wrath that the splendor of His saving … View Resource

  • Holy Ground Article by T. Desmond Alexander

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2013

    Of the rich variety of books that make up the Bible, the book of Exodus is unique in providing a micro-picture of the larger biblical story of salvation. Exodus describes how God brings estranged people into a personal relationship with Himself. The motif of knowing God permeates the book of Exodus. Although at the outset God appears far removed from the plight of the oppressed Israelites, He is well aware of their suffering. As the victims of forced labor and genocide, dehumanized and exploited by their captors, the Israelites cry out to God for help (Ex. 2:23). Fully conscious of … View Resource

  • Gospel Footprints Article by Erik Raymond

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2012

    One of the cultural plagues of the twenty-first century is our historical illiteracy. The comedian Jay Leno capitalizes on this when he asks random questions to people. Leno’s “Jaywalking” skits demonstrate that regular Americans are not up to speed with the basics of U.S. and world history. In one memorable scene, Leno asked someone to name one of the Ten Commandments. The reply: “Freedom of speech.” Enough said. I wonder how well church members would do if someone asked them questions about church history. Would they know the key players, dates, and issues? Does it even matter? Church history does … View Resource

  • The Gospel for Muslims Article by Thabiti Anyabwile

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2011

    In 2005, I make my first trip to the Middle East. I was there to engage in a Christian-Muslim dialogue sponsored by a local university’s Muslim and Christian student associations. As far as we knew, it would be the first such public dialogue in this country’s history. It would be, for many of the Muslim students, the first time they’d ever heard a Christian proclaim the gospel in person. The Frequently Asked Question and Rarely Given Answer Through out our time in the Middle East, both students and adults repeatedly asked, “How do we share the gospel with Muslims?” It’s … View Resource

  • A Relegated Gospel Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2011

    Dear Wormtongue, Before we get to the primary reason for our letter, we want to begin by commending you for the most excellent job you’ve done in your well orchestrated effort to convince your patient to keep his faith an entirely private matter, all the while thinking he’s doing a nobly sufficient job of showing forth his faith by displaying that old, faded Christian bumper sticker on his car. What’s more, you’ve gone beyond the call of duty as you’ve managed to persuade him to keep his faith segmented to one realm of his life rather than allowing it to … View Resource

  • The Soul-Shaping Reality of the Gospel: An Interview with David Wells Article by David Wells

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2011

    TT: Besides the Bible, what has been the most influential book you have read this past year? DW: Most politicians answer a slightly different question from the one they have been asked, and so may I do so, too? The book I would love to see become the year’s most influential is J.I. Packer and Gary Parrett’s Grounded in the Gospel: Building Believers the Old-Fashioned Way. It argues that our churches should be catechizing because this kind of teaching, especially of our young, preserves doctrine. Biblical doctrine is what makes the church the church. We are stumbling in passing on … View Resource