• Awaiting His Return Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2005

    There is a widespread fascination with the end of the world. Throughout history, we have witnessed the bold assertions of soothsayers, naysayers, and doomsdayers. Every day, self-proclaimed prophets of the end times make whimsical predictions about the future. Claiming to have biblical authority, they tout their cleverly devised schemes about the end of the world as we know it, and by reading between the lines of the Old Testament prophetical books, they carefully contort the words of sacred Scripture to fit their fictional fantasies about the second advent of Christ. Christians throughout the world have become so enamored with some … View Resource

  • The Big Picture Article by Robert Reymond

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2009

    Since my article is appearing in this issue of Tabletalk magazine, I have a great opportunity to tell you young folk of the next generation about a pet peeve of mine with my generation when it comes to the reason for celebrating Christmas. Many people, as you know, celebrate not much more than “roasting chestnuts by an open fire, Jack Frost nipping at their noses.” But Christians surely know enough to know that Christmas means more than that. It surely has something to do with Jesus, doesn’t it? But what? This month a lot of sermons will be preached about … View Resource

  • Church Splits Article by Tom Ascol

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2015 | John 17:11-23

    When an atom is split, its overall mass is reduced and a tremendous amount of energy is released. The results, graphically demonstrated by the two atomic bombs that ended World War II, can be massively destructive, with effects that linger for generations. The reactions that result from atom splits have their counterparts in the spiritual realm with church splits. When a congregation experiences division, the consequences are often devastating, widespread, and long lasting. The sinful severing of relationships always breeds betrayal and disillusionment. In a church, where members relate to each other as interdependent components of one body (Rom. 12:5; … View Resource

  • The Disappearance of Hell Article by John MacArthur

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2014

    According to recent polls, some 81 percent of adult Americans believe in heaven, and fully 80 percent expect to go there when they die. By comparison, about 61 percent believe in hell, but less than 1 percent think it’s likely they will go there. In other words, a slight majority of Americans still believe hell exists, but genuine fear of hell is almost nonexistent. Even the most conservative evangelicals don’t seem to take hell very seriously anymore. For decades, many evangelicals have downplayed inconvenient biblical truths, neglecting any theme that seems to require somber reflection. Doctrines such as human depravity, … View Resource

  • For Us and For Our Salvation Article by David Gibson

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2014 | Romans 5:19

    The message of salvation is the story of two Adams. “For as by the one man’s disobedience the many were made sinners, so by the one man’s obedience the many will be made righteous” (Rom. 5:19). What the first Adam undid, the second Adam repairs. But who is this second Adam, and what kind of person must He be to do this? Why is He—and only He—able to obey in this way? The Chalcedonian Creed (AD 451) says the purpose of the incarnation was “for us and for our salvation.” The creed is a statement of profound truths about the … View Resource

  • God Never Forgets Us Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2016

    We are a forgetful people. We too often overlook the majesty of creation and how it directs our gaze to our sovereign, holy, and gracious Creator. We forget to give God glory for creating us and for sustaining us. We forget to thank Him for all blessings. We forget to pray to Him, and we forget to praise Him. We forget His steadfast and abounding love. We forget what Christ has done for us, in us, and through us. We forget Christ’s law-fulfilling life, and we forget His sacrificial, atoning death. We forget His resurrection, and we forget that we … View Resource

  • Gospel Footprints Article by Erik Raymond

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2012

    One of the cultural plagues of the twenty-first century is our historical illiteracy. The comedian Jay Leno capitalizes on this when he asks random questions to people. Leno’s “Jaywalking” skits demonstrate that regular Americans are not up to speed with the basics of U.S. and world history. In one memorable scene, Leno asked someone to name one of the Ten Commandments. The reply: “Freedom of speech.” Enough said. I wonder how well church members would do if someone asked them questions about church history. Would they know the key players, dates, and issues? Does it even matter? Church history does … View Resource

  • The Gospel for Muslims Article by Thabiti Anyabwile

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2011

    In 2005, I make my first trip to the Middle East. I was there to engage in a Christian-Muslim dialogue sponsored by a local university’s Muslim and Christian student associations. As far as we knew, it would be the first such public dialogue in this country’s history. It would be, for many of the Muslim students, the first time they’d ever heard a Christian proclaim the gospel in person. The Frequently Asked Question and Rarely Given Answer Through out our time in the Middle East, both students and adults repeatedly asked, “How do we share the gospel with Muslims?” It’s … View Resource

  • Gottschalk Article by Steven Lawson

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2009

    Amid the swirling controversies of the ninth century, there was raised a strong voice for sovereign grace belonging to an unknown German monk named Gottschalk of Orbais (ca. 804–869). Like Augustine before him and Luther and Calvin after him, Gottschalk possessed an overriding sense of the sovereignty of God in salvation, and he brought it to bear upon his turbulent generation. It was in this dark hour of history that this medieval theologian stood in the gap to uphold the banner of the doctrines of grace. Born at Mentz in modern Germany, Gottschalk was the son of a respected nobleman, … View Resource

  • Grace Alone Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2009 | Matthew 13

    Soli Deo gloria is the motto that grew out of the Protestant Reformation and was used on every composition by Johann Sebastian Bach. He affixed the initials SDG at the bottom of each manuscript to communicate the idea that it is God and God alone who is to receive the glory for the wonders of His work of creation and of redemption. At the heart of the sixteenth-century controversy over salvation was the issue of grace. It was not a question of man’s need for grace. It was a question as to the extent of that need. The church had … View Resource

  • The Great Exchange Article by Rick Gamble

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2009

    In the cross of Christ, as in a splendid theater, the incomparable goodness of God is set before the whole world. The glory of God shines, indeed, in all creatures on high and below, but never more brightly than in the cross, in which there was a wonderful change of things — the condemnation of all men was manifested, sin blotted out, salvation restored to men; in short, the whole world was renewed and all things restored to order. …The cross was accursed, not only in human opinion but by decree of God’s law [Deut. 21:23]. Hence, when Christ … View Resource

  • Holy Ground Article by T. Desmond Alexander

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2013

    Of the rich variety of books that make up the Bible, the book of Exodus is unique in providing a micro-picture of the larger biblical story of salvation. Exodus describes how God brings estranged people into a personal relationship with Himself. The motif of knowing God permeates the book of Exodus. Although at the outset God appears far removed from the plight of the oppressed Israelites, He is well aware of their suffering. As the victims of forced labor and genocide, dehumanized and exploited by their captors, the Israelites cry out to God for help (Ex. 2:23). Fully conscious of … View Resource

  • Is God Unjust? Article by Jared Oliphint

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2017

    The phrase must have looped over and over in Adam’s mind aftˆer he took his first bite of the forbidden fruit. “In the day that you eat of it you shall surely die” (Gen. 2:17). This was the day he ate of it, so this was the day he would surely die. I can’t imagine the terror Adam felt as he stitched together a few fig leaves for make-shiftˆ clothes. Adam was now on borrowed time before his inevitable punishment. Judgment day had come.  While God introduced earthly justice that day, He also restrained His judgment’s full weight and granted … View Resource

  • Is the Reformation Over? Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2009

    There have been several observations rendered on this subject by those I would call “erstwhile evangelicals.” One of them wrote, “Luther was right in the sixteenth century, but the question of justification is not an issue now.” A second self-confessed evangelical made a comment in a press conference I attended that “the sixteenth-century Reformation debate over justification by faith alone was a tempest in a teapot.” Still another noted European theologian has argued in print that the doctrine of justification by faith alone is no longer a significant issue in the church. We are faced with a host of people … View Resource

  • Out of the Many, One Article by Anthony Carter

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2009

    In the title “United States of America,” the emphasis is necessarily on the word united. When America was in its infancy and seeking to establish itself as a sovereign nation, it faced many challenges, not the least of which was that King George of England was not interested in letting his colonies in America go free. If these colonies were to establish themselves as a nation apart from British rule, they were going to have to do so by defeating the most powerful army on the earth, namely, the British Army. To do so, it would have to pull … View Resource