• Should Not Perish Article by Guy Richard

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2016

    Jesus says that in the days leading up to His second coming, people will be totally unaware of what is about to happen to them. They will be “eating and drinking, marrying and giving in marriage,” just as people were in the days leading up to the flood in the time of Noah. In the same way that “they were unaware until the flood came and swept them all away,” so also many will be equally unaware when Christ returns and the day of the flood of God’s judgment comes upon the earth and sweeps them away (Matt. 24:36–39). It … View Resource

  • So Loved Article by John MacArthur

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2016

    John 3:16 may or may not be the most familiar verse in all of Scripture, but it is surely one of the most abused and least understood. The verse is so well known that the reference alone is thought by some to be a sufficient proclamation of the gospel. Arminians extract the phrase “God so loved the world” from its context and use it as an argument for universal atonement, meaning Christ’s death made redemption possible for all. More extreme universalists push the same argument even further. They claim the verse proves that God loves everyone exactly the same, and … View Resource

  • Whoever Believes in Him Article by Cornelis Venema

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2016

    In contemporary North America, people are often seen at sporting events holding a poster with “John 3:16” written upon it in large print. While this may not be the most effective evangelistic strategy, it does bear witness to an important truth. No passage in the Bible more powerfully undergirds the biblical imperative to herald the good news concerning Jesus Christ to all sinners than this one. Even if the risen Christ had never given the church the Great Commission, John 3:16 would suffice to drive believers to tell all the world of God’s great love, which He demonstrated in the … View Resource

  • The World Article by John Tweeddale

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2016

    One of the most surprising twists of John 3:16 is that we are told God loves the world. We might be tempted to think that there is much about the world for God to love. After all, what’s not to admire about cityscapes and farmlands, fine cuisine and backyard barbecues, classical symphonies and folk ballads, Renaissance paintings and kindergarten squiggles? The world we know is filled with texture, intrigue, opportunity, and cheer. The problem is that for all that is good and interesting and beautiful about the world, it is overrun with sinners. Ever since Adam and Eve rebelled against … View Resource

  • Cut Off Your Hand, Tear Out Your Eye Article by Ray Ortlund

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2015

    Hard words are not harmful words—when they come from Jesus. This is important to keep in mind when we read: If your hand or your foot causes you to sin, cut it off and throw it away. It is better for you to enter life crippled or lame than with two hands or two feet to be thrown into the eternal fire. And if your eye causes you to sin, tear it out and throw it away. It is better for you to enter life with one eye than with two eyes to be thrown into the hell of fire. … View Resource

  • What Is Grace? Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2015

    A number of decades ago at the Ligonier Valley Study Center, we sent out a Thanksgiving card with this simple statement: “The essence of theology is grace; the essence of Christian ethics is gratitude.” In all the debates about our role versus God’s role in sanctification—our growth in holiness—we’d stay on the right track if we’d remember this grace-gratitude dynamic. The more we understand how kind God has been to us and the more we are overcome by His mercy, the more we are inclined to love Him and to serve Him. Yet we can’t get the grace-gratitude dynamic right … View Resource

  • Divine Incomprehensibility Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2014 | Genesis 1

    What can we know about God? That’s the most basic question of theology, for what we can know about God and whether we can know anything about Him at all determine the scope and content of our study. Here we must consider the teaching of the greatest theologians in history, all of whom have affirmed the “incomprehensibility of God.” By using the term incomprehensible, they are not referring to something we are unable to comprehend or know at all. Theologically speaking, to say God is incomprehensible is not to say that God is utterly unknowable. It is to say … View Resource

  • For the Glory of God Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2014

    At the church I co-pastor, Saint Andrew’s Chapel in Sanford, Florida, we are deliberate about making sure that both our church members and visitors understand the doctrinal basis of our fellowship. As a small way of helping to further that end, we note in our church bulletin every Sunday morning that “we affirm the solas of the Protestant Reformation.” By way of reminder, the five solas are five points that summarize the biblical theology recovered and proclaimed during the Protestant Reformation. As we note in our bulletin, these five solas are: Sola Scriptura: The Bible is the sole written divine … View Resource

  • The Holy of Holies Article by Daniel Hyde

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2013

    That I may dwell in their midst” (Ex. 25:8). Israel’s tabernacle was a piece of astonishing architecture. Its whole purpose was to incarnate the immense and infinite presence of God. Until it was built, God’s presence was manifested at different times, at different places, and in different ways. To Adam and Eve, He revealed Himself as they “heard the sound of the Lord God walking in the garden” (Gen. 3:8). To Abraham He revealed Himself as a smoking fire pot and flaming torch (15:17). To Jacob He revealed Himself as a man with whom Jacob could wrestle (32:22–32). To Moses … View Resource

  • Glory Article by John Currid

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2011

    In Exodus 33, we witness an intimate discourse between God and Moses. Within this divine human dialogue, Moses makes an odd request: “Moses said, ‘Please show me your glory.’ And he said, ‘I will make all my goodness pass before you and will proclaim before you my name “The LORD.” And I will be gracious to whom I will be gracious, and will show mercy on whom I will show mercy’” (vv. 18–19). What exactly is Moses asking of God when he requests to see His “glory”? And how do we understand God’s answer to Moses’ question? Moses’ question to … View Resource

  • Kingdom Article by James M. Hamilton, Jr.

    FROM TABLETALK | November 2011

    What is the kingdom of God? The answer cannot be reduced to a word study of the term kingdom. That would be a helpful exercise, but the Bible describes the kingdom even when the word is not used. Any kingdom will consist of a king, his realm, its citizens, and the law that regulates their lives. This is true of God’s kingdom as well. What follows is a short overview of the Bible’s presentation of God’s rule over God’s people in God’s place according to God’s law. God’s Rule Adam is not called a king, but God gives him … View Resource

  • The Old Testament God of Compassion and Mercy Article by Miles Van Pelt

    FROM TABLETALK | December 2010

    Perhaps you are one of those people, like me, who grew up thinking about the Old Testament as a book filled with wrath and judgment, doom and gloom, atrocity and injustice. To make matters worse, the New Testament appeared to be the product of the hippie movement of the 1970s, promoting peace, mercy, and brotherly love. Such a dichotomy, however, could not be further from the truth. The Old and New Testaments are united in their affirmation that the God of the Bible is a merciful and compassionate God. In fact, it would not be inappropriate to characterize the entire … View Resource

  • Israel’s Salvation Article by Ken Jones

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2010

    The eleventh chapter of Romans opens with the apostle Paul, a descendant of Abraham, asking the question: “Has God rejected [ethnic Israel]?” The short answer to this question is given in verse 5: “So too at the present time there is a remnant, chosen by grace.” This comes after Paul alludes to Elijah’s rebuke of Israel for killing God’s prophets and destroying His altars (vv. 3–4; see 1 Kings 19:10, 14). But the question about Israel’s status permeates much of the letter to the Romans, especially chapters 1–2 and 9–11. Israel’s status is particularly emphasized in chapters 9 and 10, … View Resource

  • Source of True Teaching Article by Kim Riddlebarger

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2009

    Q. What rule hath God given to direct us how we may glorify and enjoy him?  A. The Word of God, which is contained in the Scriptures of the Old and New Testaments, is the only rule to direct us how we may glorify and enjoy him. (Westminster Shorter Catechism Q&A 2) When someone begins a statement with “I think God is like…,” I immediately know that this person doesn’t have a clue as to what God is like. The reason I can say this is because God is an infinite spiritual being, which means that we can know nothing … View Resource

  • The Theater of God’s Glory Article by David Hall

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2009

    Ever since in the creation of the universe he brought forth those insignia whereby he shows his glory to us, whenever and wherever we cast our gaze. …And since the glory of his power and wisdom shine more brightly above, heaven is often called his palace. Yet…wherever you cast your eyes, there is no spot in the universe wherein you cannot discern at least some sparks of his glory.” (Institutes, 1.5.1) From the Institutes’ preface, John Calvin portrayed the human condition as “naked of all virtue,” enslaved, blind, and weak. The purpose of this depiction was to … View Resource