• Doubt and Assurance Article by John Tweeddale

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2016

    The quest for full assurance of salvation has long plagued the people of God. Many Christians place their faith in Christ alone for redemption but still live with doubts about their standing before God. For these dear saints, the tension between doubt and assurance can be crippling. A crisis of doubt can happen to any follower of Christ. Even the mightiest of preachers can lack assurance. John Owen once confessed to a colleague his own struggles with assurance of God’s forgiveness. “I myself preached Christ some years,” he admitted, “when I had but very little, if any, experimental acquaintance with … View Resource

  • Dealing with Doubt Article by Randy Alcorn

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2014 | 2 Timothy 3:16

    In times of doubt, difficulty, and trials, our fundamental beliefs about God and our faith are revealed. So how can Christians find faith in the midst of doubt? How can they trust God’s plan when their lives seem out of His control, and prayers seem to go unanswered or, as it sometimes feels, even unheard? If you or someone you love has been there, these questions may be far more personal than theoretical. You might ask questions like these: Is God good? Is He sovereign? Does He care? When we’re assailed by trials, we need perspective for our minds and … View Resource

  • How Then Should We Love? Article by Kelly Kapic

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2013

    Has it ever struck you how strange it sounds to be commanded to love? Say you are a devoted Pittsburgh Steelers fan and someone told you to love the Dallas Cowboys. This would not sound like a joyful invitation, but rather a cruel joke. How can I love what I do not even like? Scripture does not merely invite us to love God and neighbor; we are commanded to do so. And this is where it gets a bit tricky. How can we be commanded to love? Sometimes in reaction to our culture, which often confuses love with sappy sentimentality, … View Resource

  • Doubt-Killing Promises Article by Justin Taylor

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2013

    Even though Charles Spurgeon lived about two hundred years after John Bunyan, I think Spurgeon regarded Bunyan as a friend. He said the book he valued most, next to the Bible, was The Pilgrim’s Progress. “I believe I have read it through at least a hundred times. It is a volume of which I never seem to tire.” Perhaps one of the reasons Spurgeon resonated with this classic was its realistic portrayal of depression, doubt, and despair. Spurgeon and Bunyan, like their Savior, were men of sorrow, acquainted with grief (Isa. 53:3). When Bunyan went to prison for preaching … View Resource

  • Feeding Your Soul Article by Jon Bloom

    FROM TABLETALK | October 2012

    When your soul is in turmoil, it’s hard to see clearly. Fear, anger, sorrow, and despair can distort your perception of reality. It’s hard to keep things in perspective. They can actually magnify your troubles. Often, when you’re feeling overwhelmed, what you need is somebody to take you by the shoulders, look you square in the eye, and speak some sense to you. Sometimes that somebody is you. I get this from the Bible. Listen to the psalmist talk to himself: “Why are you cast down, O my soul, and why are you in turmoil within me? Hope in God; … View Resource

  • What If or If God? Article by J.R. Vassar

    FROM TABLETALK | September 2011

    I love the Lord of the Rings. I remember sitting in a hotel room in Seattle, Washington, in December of 2003, reading the last book of the trilogy, The Return of the King. I had just spent the previous few days in New York City at the invitation of a friend, and I was considering whether or not God might be leading us to start a church there. I left New York hopeful that I would never move there. To be honest, there was a lot of fear in my heart about the city. It was overwhelmingly large, … View Resource

  • Transforming Love Article by Jerry Bridges

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2004

    A deeply distressed father sat for two weeks in a pediatric ICU, watching his three-year-old son slowly die. During those two weeks he read through, quite surprisingly, a book on the Gospel. He later wrote to me, “I want to say to you the Gospel really is for real life.” I was puzzled by his statement. How did a book on the Gospel minister to this father in his hour of deep tragedy? I’d have thought a book about trusting God in times of adversity might have been helpful. But a book on the Gospel? How could it help at … View Resource

  • Confidence in Christ Article by Chris Donato

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2004

    Faith cannot be without a settled peace of mind, from which proceeds the bold confidence of rejoicing,” John Calvin writes in his commentary on Hebrews during the mid-sixteenth century. This point is most striking, and mostly underplayed by many exegetes. How could Calvin write something so … insensitive? And again: “We hence conclude that those who assent to the Gospel doubtfully and like those who vacillate, do not truly and really believe.” Just as faith is the assurance of things hoped for, so, too, is faith the constant and confident hope of the believer (Heb. 11:1; cf. 3:6). … View Resource

  • The Anatomy of Doubt Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | January 1992

    Spiritus sanctus non est skepticus—“The Holy Spirit is not a skeptic.” So Luther rebuked Erasmus of Rotterdam for his expressed disdain for making sure assertions. Luther roared, “The making of assertions is the very mark of the Christian. Take away assertions and you take away Christianity. Away now, with the skeptics!” Doubt is the hallmark of the skeptic. The skeptic dares to doubt the indubitable. Even demonstrable proof fails to persuade him. The skeptic dwells on Mt. Olympus, far aloof from the struggles of mortals who care to pursue truth. But doubt has other faces. It is the assailant … View Resource

  • Doubt and the Apologist Article by Andrew Hoffecker

    FROM TABLETALK | January 1992

    Doubt” is to a Christian apologist what “choke” is to a professional athlete and “block” to a best-selling novelist. You expect Michael Jordan to score with seconds on the clock and Tom Clancy to write as deadlines approach. And C.S. Lewis should radiate unflinching certainty against rational attacks on Christianity. But life does not always conform to the ideal. If choking is commonplace in athletes, and writer’s block freezes untold authors, are apologists immune to doubt?A case in point involved C.S. Lewis’ activity in the Oxford Socratic Club. Established with Lewis’ encouragement in 1941, the Socratic boasted of being … View Resource