• Liberty vs. Law? Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | February 2005

    I have often heard people define liberty as the ability to do whatever you want to do whenever you want to do it. Although such a definition may sound good on the surface, it more accurately defines anarchy than it does liberty. While many in our society cry for “liberty,” they are actually advocating a form of social anarchy. By demanding their “liberty” to have the right to choose the life or death of an unborn child, they are demanding the right to murder merely for the sake of personal convenience. By fighting for the “liberty” to define marriage … View Resource

  • Patience in Christ Article by Robert Rothwell

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2004

    Despite the inefficiency and increasing indecency of our society, I have to admit that I enjoy living in the United States. In fact, there is no other country in the world in which I would like to live. I have benefited from the many opportunities this country has to offer, and I like to think that I enjoy this country because it has, despite its faults, brought good to many parts of the world. What I have said, notwithstanding, I will confess that I grow increasingly disillusioned with America’s insistence on having everything right here and right now. We look … View Resource

  • Mercy Established Article by Chris Donato

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2004

    From Hebrews 7:26–28 we see the importance given to the fact that Jesus identifies with those for whom He died by undergoing temptation. We are also made aware of the necessity that this High Priest be sinless, or else He would not have been qualified to enter into the heavenly sanctuary on our behalf. The author of this epistle clearly assumes that this once-for-all sacrifice is enacted on behalf of individuals: “… since he did this [offer a sacrifice for the sins of the people] once for all when he offered up himself” (Heb. 7:27b). What wondrous love … View Resource

  • Don’t Look Back Article by R.C. Sproul Jr.

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2004

    Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice, shame on me. I’ll admit I got taken in the first time. As a grade school child my conception of cool included too tight silk shirts and blue jeans with more flair than Liberace. I even had my own polyester jumpsuit. I looked like a cross between Howdy Doody and Elvis, in his latter years. The current fashion craze of recreating the nightmare of the seventies hasn’t filled my heart with a warm dose of nostalgia. Instead it makes me embarrassed for what I used to wear. I’ve learned my lesson … View Resource

  • A Bad Moon Rising: The Growth of Islam in the U.S. Article by Mark Horne

    FROM TABLETALK | April 1998

    Islam is the second largest religion in the world. In 1995 about 1,122,661,000 Muslims inhabited this planet. Count the commas, folks—that’s a billion plus a hundred million. That means of every living person, one in five is a Muslim. As citizens of what is yet a superpower, we tend not to notice the worldwide Islamic population, of which merely sixteen percent are Arabs. But this blindness to our situation needs to change, not only so we can be more aware of the need for foreign missions, but so we can be aware of the needs of our … View Resource

  • Bubble Gum and the Trinity Article by Douglas Wilson

    FROM TABLETALK | April 1998

    I recently told a class of tenth-graders that what our culture needed was a return to Trinitarian bubble-gum commercials. They were a little nonplussed, and so I hastened to explain that as individuals with one set of ultimate commitments, we have the capacity to live in alien soil, that is, a culture with a different set of commitments. In other words, a Muslim can live and prosper in a Trinitarian culture. In that culture he can live and die a Muslim. But if enough Muslims congregate together, the logical extensions of their fundamental faith will necessarily work its way out … View Resource

  • Inside Islam Article by Abdul Saleeb

    FROM TABLETALK | April 1998

    Although the religion of Islam is more characterized by its focus on the law, or shari’a, Islam also offers a comprehensive system of theology. Muslims often proudly point out that their doctrinal system is internally consistent, simple to understand, and devoid of the many mysteries surrounding the Christian faith. Traditionally, Islamic theology has been described in terms of the “five pillars” of faith (iman). These five teachings consist of belief in God, the angels, the prophets, their scriptures, and the day of judgment. God The cornerstone of Islam is the unshakable belief in the absolute oneness, sovereignty, and transcendence of … View Resource

  • Songs from Exile Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | April 1997

    In exile the people of Israel faced the question: “How do you sing the Lord’s song in a strange and foreign land?” The question is similar to that faced by contemporary American Christians. Ours is a spiritual exile as we confront a culture and government increasingly hostile to Christianity. We look to Nehemiah for clues to guide our own pilgrimage in difficult times. Nehemiah was grief-stricken by the news of the condition of Jerusalem. The walls were broken down and its gates burned with fire. His first emotion over the sad loss of his heritage was grief. It was … View Resource

  • Error and Our Era Article by Ken Myers

    FROM TABLETALK | April 1994

    Truth is great and will prevail, if left to itself.” Thus asserted Thomas Jefferson, champion of free speech and enemy of established religion. I’m not sure that Jefferson entirely believed that. Jefferson did believe that only an educated, well-informed citizenry could remain a free citizenry. His commitment to freedom of the press was based on a desire to see a citizenry committed to the disciplines of reading, marking, inwardly digesting, and weighing the arguments of works such as Common Sense and The Federalist papers, not Howard Stern or Tina Brown. As Richard Mitchell has commented, Jefferson could not have imagined … View Resource

  • The Present Hope of the Church Article by Harry Reeder

    FROM TABLETALK | May 1992

    Is there any HOPE for the church in general? What about your church in particular? While realizing the Scriptures promise a triumphant hope at the return of Christ, is there any present hope for the church as we anticipate the Second Advent of Christ? I believe so because the Scriptures say so. But first let me share a personal experience concerning the church and our present hope. In 1988, I was privileged to go on a pastoral mission trip to Uganda. Most of the ministry time was spent in and around the capital city of Kampala. I can’t tell … View Resource

  • Church Growth—First Things First Article by Os Guinness

    FROM TABLETALK | March 1992

    When all is said and done, the church-growth movement will stand or fall by one question: In implementing its vision of church growth, is the church of Christ primarily guided and shaped by its own character and calling—or by considerations and circumstances alien to itself? Or, to put the question differently, is the church of Christ a social reality truly shaped by a theological cause, namely the Word and Spirit of God? Behind this question lies the fact that the church of God only “lets God be God,” and is only the church, and is free when she lives and … View Resource

  • Church Growth—Weaknesses to Watch Article by Os Guinness

    FROM TABLETALK | February 1992

    Like many movements, the church-growth movement is a grand mixture of things good, bad, and in-between. After stressing its significance last month, I will not comment further on its good parts—except to say that anything that “goes without saying” is in danger of being left unsaid. The best of the church-growth movement deserves better than that.Our present concern, however, is not the good but rather the bad and the in-between. For if the movement has a threefold positive significance, it also has a threefold weakness.First, the church-growth movement has two common deficiencies. On the one hand, its theological … View Resource