• Why Are Eastern Religions So Attractive to So Many? Article by Winfried Corduan

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2012

    Recently, I was talking to a Buddhist nun. Originally from Hanover, Germany, she had studied Buddhism in a course on religions, read a few more books, and left home and family to join an order in Taiwan. I asked her on what basis she had decided that Buddhism was true. She responded that there was no firm measuring stick but that as you observe the positive traits in the lives of people who pursue a certain set of beliefs, you may find yourself inclined to adopt their principles as well. Her answer was subjective and pragmatic. It also implied that … View Resource

  • Between Two Worlds: An Interview with Justin Taylor Article by Justin Taylor

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2012

    Tabletalk: What led you to start a blog? Justin Taylor: One of my favorite parts of elementary school was “show and tell.” I’ve always enjoyed sharing with others those things that I find fascinating. Eight years ago, I would regularly send a small group of friends items of interest on the Internet, and blogging seemed like a natural extension of what I was already doing, except for a wider audience. My assumption was that many Christians are already on the web every day. My goal is simply to put before them a steady stream of edifying links, excerpts, and … View Resource

  • A Revival of Calvinism: An Interview with Iain Murray Article by Iain Murray

    FROM TABLETALK | August 2011

    Tabletalk: What are the top three puritan works that every Christian should read and why? Iain Murray: The Westminster Shorter Catechism; Heaven on Earth by Thomas Brooks (on assurance); Nature and Causes of Apostasy by John Owen (Works of John Owen, vol. 7); and many other “top” ones. Beginners should start with Brooks, Thomas Watson, or John Flavel. TT: What book (new or old) have you found the most helpful in your past year of reading? IM: For particular reasons, the majority of my reading in 2010 was in the works of John MacArthur and Archibald Brown (I hope to … View Resource

  • The Perils and Promise of Social Media Article by Collin Hansen

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2011

    Church leaders today find themselves caught between two equally valid but competing realities. Social media have become valuable, even necessary, tools for teaching and exercising leadership. Yet Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and blogs cannot substitute for the local church, which is a living testimony to Jesus Christ. Striking the right balance requires wisdom and discernment to prioritize the local church while learning the strengths and weaknesses of social media. Awkwardly co-existing, the real and virtual worlds undoubtedly shape one another. Look no further than the recent resurgence of Calvinism among younger evangelicals. Whereas Calvinists outside the confessional denominations once found fellowship … View Resource

  • Whitewashing History? Article by Carl R. Trueman

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2011 | Hebrews 11

    To borrow a phrase from Charles Dickens’ A Tale of Two Cities, it is the best of times, the worst of times. That is how one might describe the current movie-saturated era. Certainly, from an entertainment perspective, it is the best of times. While I myself still prefer the classic films of the 40s and 50s, from The Maltese Falcon to The Searchers, it is hard not to be impressed by everything from the special effects in something like Inception to the sheer brilliance of acting in The King’s Speech. Yet therein lies the problem, that which makes it, in … View Resource

  • The Devil Is Not in the Details Article by Kevin DeYoung

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2011

    It may have sounded prophetic at one point, but now it’s rather prosaic. Everyone knows (or is supposed to know) that individualism is bad. An emphasis on the individual — such a common theme in the West — has been blamed for myriad problems, including everything from friendlessness to consumerism, from contemporary praise music to gated communities. And no doubt, individualism has its downside. For the church, it’s meant an aversion to authority, a reluctance to accept certain elements of covenant theology, and a community life that isn’t everything it could be. Problem duly noted. But let us not forget … View Resource

  • Holding the Line: An Interview with R. Albert Mohler Jr. Article by Albert Mohler

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2011

    Tabletalk: In 1993, shortly after your appointment as president of The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, there was substantial faculty fallout and a sharp move in an orthodox direction. Would you give us a glimpse into that time for you and how a seminary could do an about-face in such a short span of time? Albert Mohler: My election as president of Southern Seminary came in the course of a larger movement within the Southern Baptist Convention (SBC) — a movement that was specifically an attempt to bring the denomination back to its theological roots and especially to ground the denomination … View Resource

  • Heresy of the Free Spirit Article by Kevin DeYoung

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2011

    Marguerite Porete was a French mystic born in the thirteenth century. She was part of the Beguines, a voluntary, informal, semi-monastic community not unlike the new monasticism popping up in some urban centers. Marguerite, though unknown to almost all contemporary Christians, was influential and controversial in her day. She was burned at the stake in Paris in 1310, and her views were later condemned at the Council of Vienne in 1312. What got her in trouble was The Mirror of Simple Souls, Marguerite’s exploration on what she calls the seven states of grace. In the fifth and sixth states … View Resource

  • The End of Soap Oprah Article by Carl R. Trueman

    FROM TABLETALK | March 2011

    The passing of the Oprah Winfrey Show is surely worthy of being described with that most overworked of clichés, as “the end of an era.” Except, of course, it is not the end of an era so much as the morphing of Ms. Winfrey’s career into a new form. It is hard to imagine that the public has seen the last of her, and the values and culture that her show represented are here for the foreseeable future. I well remember one of my sisters raving about how “Oprah says this, Oprah says that!” in the late nineteen-eighties … View Resource

  • The Soul-Shaping Reality of the Gospel: An Interview with David Wells Article by David Wells

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2011

    TT: Besides the Bible, what has been the most influential book you have read this past year? DW: Most politicians answer a slightly different question from the one they have been asked, and so may I do so, too? The book I would love to see become the year’s most influential is J.I. Packer and Gary Parrett’s Grounded in the Gospel: Building Believers the Old-Fashioned Way. It argues that our churches should be catechizing because this kind of teaching, especially of our young, preserves doctrine. Biblical doctrine is what makes the church the church. We are stumbling in passing on … View Resource

  • After the Revolution Article by Albert Mohler

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2010

    Welcome to the Brave New World of new media. Over the last two decades, we have experienced nothing less than a revolution in the ways that information is gathered, manipulated, published, and disseminated. And, as is the case with any development of this magnitude, Christians must give careful consideration to our responsibility in the context of this new digital age. View Resource

  • The Blessings of the New Media Article by Ed Stetzer

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2010

    Popular and emerging forms of social media such as Facebook, Twitter, and blogging are all around us. Yet many pastors and church leaders have been reluctant to embrace them. These new forms of media have become a very present part of our culture, and while abuses and misuses are often pointed out, I would like to suggest that when used in the best ways, the new media are a blessing and aid to our churches, pastors, and church planters. As I see it, social media assist churches and Christian leaders in at least four ways. View Resource

  • Who Is Using Whom? Article by Tim Challies

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2010

    There must have been a day, many thousands of years ago, when a particularly enterprising individual invented the wheel. It is such a simple thing but one that completely revolutionized the world. It is an invention none of us would wish to be without. But transport yourself back to the moment the wheel was unveiled and you will no doubt see that some Luddite nearby was shaking his head, clucking his tongue, and mumbling, “There goes the neighborhood.” View Resource

  • Compromising Truth and Practice Article by Walter Chantry

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2010

    Just before Jesus was taken up into heaven He told His disciples: “You will receive power when the Holy Spirit has come upon you, and you will be my witnesses in Jerusalem and in all Judea and Samaria, and to the end of the earth” (Acts 1:8). Witnessing about who Jesus is and what He taught was to be cross-cultural. As His disciples faced new social and cultural changes, they were expected to hold fast to truth and righteousness so as to be bright lights of witnessing all over the world. View Resource

  • How Consumer Culture Fuels Change Article by Carl R. Trueman

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2010

    Discussion of culture has become a virtual shibboleth in contemporary evangelicalism, left and right. Whether this is itself a biblical imperative or merely a cultural reaction to a time when fundamentalism ruled the roost is a matter for debate. Indeed, one of the perplexing things about the trendy Christian culture vultures is that, generally speaking, when they talk about “culture” they are usually referring to what we might call popular culture, particularly movies, internet, and music, with, more often than not, a youth orientation. “Culture” as the traditions, institutions, and mechanisms by which a society transmits a way of life … View Resource