• The Goose by Aaron Denlinger

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2015

    If he were prophetic, he must have meant Martin Luther, who shone about a hundred years after.” So wrote John Foxe in his sixteenth-century Book of Martyrs, referring to a statement attributed to the Bohemian reformer Jan Hus on the …Read More

  • Anselm by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2011

    Anselm held the position of archbishop of Canterbury from 1093 to 1109. A Benedictine monk, philosopher, and theologian, he stands as one of the most significant thinkers in the history of the Western church. His influence is not due to …Read More

  • Where Is the Glory Found? by R.C. Sproul Jr.

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2009

    As birthdays go, it’s a big one. It is fitting and appropriate that we would mark the five-hundredth anniversary of the birth of John Calvin. Trouble is, that occasion is being marked in at least two different ways. First, those …Read More

  • Good Old Calvinism by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2009

    John Calvin was a churchman for all ages. He was a reformer par excellence. He was a godly pastor who equipped his people for ministry. He was a humble revolutionary. He was a loyal husband, father, and friend. But above …Read More

  • An 11th Century Reformer by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | May 2011

    According to tradition, following the Norman Conquest of England in 1066, William the Conqueror, the Duke of Normandy, captured the English throne. As a result, Edgar the Atheling of England was unable to secure his rightful claim to the English …Read More

  • Church History in Christ by George Grant

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2004

    By the end of the eighteenth century, the church of Geneva had become a mere shadow of its former glory. The pulpit of John Calvin no longer thundered with the bold truths of the Protestant Reformation. It no longer broadcast …Read More

  • The Spanish Inquisition by Stephen Nichols

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2015

    In 1492, Ferdinand and Isabella of Spain sponsored Christopher Columbus and his voyage to the New World. But in 1477, they were behind something far more infamous. In that year, the Spanish monarchs petitioned Pope Sixtus IV to revive the …Read More

  • The Dawn of Reformation by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | July 2015

    The brightest object in the sky, after the sun and moon, is the morning star. It appears about an hour before dawn. John Wycliffe (c. 1330-84) is often called the “Morning Star of the Reformation,” and for good reason, for …Read More

  • A Mind Captivated by God by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2008

    I have journeyed through the land of Narnia. Nearly ten years ago, I had the privilege to stay at Rathvinden House, located in the beautiful rolling-green countryside of County Carlow, Ireland. At that time, the Rathvinden estate was owned and operated …Read More

  • The Key to C.S. Lewis by Gene Edward Veith

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2008

    C.S. Lewis was not only a Christian apologist and lay theologian. He was also an unusually imaginative and creative novelist. And in his day job at Oxford and then Cambridge he was an astonishingly perceptive and influential literary scholar …Read More

  • God in the Dock: The Apologetics of C. S. Lewis by Roger Nicole

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2008

    In modern English the words apology and apologize indicate regret because some statement or action was offensive and wrong. This is not the case for “apologetics” in theology, for that discipline is intended to manifest “a point of view is …Read More

  • In Word and Deed by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2005

    We have all heard the saying: “Practice what you preach.” Early in my ministerial training, I became convinced of the importance of the truth that Christians, particularly preachers, should practice what they preach. After several years of working to …Read More

  • Fighting the Good Fight by Stephen Nichols

    FROM TABLETALK | April 2005

    Warfield’s world, once he arrived at Princeton in 1887, was not very large at all. His house, the Old Hodge House, conveniently situated him next to Alexander Hall, which contained Princeton Seminary’s dorm rooms and classrooms. Across the lawn stood Miller …Read More

  • A Sower Went Out To Sow by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2009

    Church historian Mark Noll writes, “In many ways, the defining figure in the history of American evangelicalism is the eighteenth-century revivalist George Whitefield.” Prior to America’s declaration of independence from England, the Calvinist preacher from England turned the colonies …Read More

  • Objective Cultural Norms by George Grant

    FROM TABLETALK | June 2004

    For Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832), the principle of “all things to all men” was not a moral warrant for upholding cultural relativism. Instead, it was a practical mandate for upholding cultural norms. It was for him an inducement to communicate …Read More