• An Apology for Apologetics Article by Stephen Nichols

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2016

    My professor of apologetics in seminary told stories of odd reactions he received when he would tell people what he did for a living. The best story involved a bank loan officer. When he told the loan officer that he was a professor of apologetics, she replied, “That’s wonderful.” Then she added, “These days, we really do need to teach people how to say they are sorry.” The loan officer was both right and wrong. We do need apologetics professors, but apologetics isn’t about saying we’re sorry. Rather, it’s about defending the faith. In fact, defending … View Resource

  • Christ Article by Keith Mathison

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2016

    In his ministry, the Apostle Paul boldly proclaimed Jesus Christ and Him crucified, and as followers of Christ, we are called to do the same. Yet we do so knowing that the message of the gospel is foolishness to the world. As such, it has always been the object of derision by unbelievers. We see an example of this in a piece of ancient graffiti that was unearthed in Rome in 1857. The image depicts a human figure with the head of a donkey nailed to a cross. Next to the figure on the cross is a young man. An … View Resource

  • The Church Article by John Tweeddale

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2016

    The first time the word church is mentioned in the New Testament, it comes from the lips of Jesus. To a ragtag band of Apostles, He declared, “I will build my church, and the gates of hell shall not prevail against it” (Matt. 16:18). With these words, Jesus set a course to change the world. The twentieth-century scholar Alfred North Whitehead once suggested that the development of Western thought is a series of footnotes on Plato. While the prominence of the famous Greek philosopher is undeniable, Jesus’ assertion is even more far-reaching. The entire history of the world is … View Resource

  • General Revelation Article by W. Robert Godfrey

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2016

    Nothing is more important than knowing God as He truly is. For this reason, the church has confessed many truths about our God throughout history. God is the eternal Trinity, the almighty Creator, the wise Sustainer, the effective Redeemer, and the coming Judge. One truth not so clearly articulated in our creeds is that God is the trustworthy Revealer. To know God as He is, He must reveal Himself to us. Because God is infinite, He cannot be fully comprehended by finite creatures. We are blinded to God’s truth by our sin. But even before sin entered the world … View Resource

  • God Article by K. Scott Oliphint

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2016

    One of the most significant events in the life of the Lord’s people in redemptive history is the exodus. However, as important as the exodus is, it is even more important for us to see that in Exodus 3, God reveals the majestic magnificence of His character. It is a magnificence that contains two glorious truths, inextricably linked, without which the Christian God cannot be understood or worshiped. As important as the salvation of Israel from Egypt is, it cannot properly be understood unless it is framed within the revelation of God’s twofold character as expressed by God … View Resource

  • Grief and the Christian Article by Elizabeth Groves

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2016

    We worship a big God. He is sovereign and powerful. We are in His hands, and nothing happens to us by chance. That’s good news. But in grief, if that is all we remember about God, it might actually make the pain worse, rather than better. It might leave us thinking, like Mary and Martha (John 11:21, 32), “Lord, you could have stopped this, and you purposely didn’t. Why?” God’s sovereignty might leave us more angry than comforted. So we need to remember some other things, too. Jesus Defeated Death God hates death even more than … View Resource

  • The Holy Spirit Article by Sinclair Ferguson

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2016

    Many people come to faith in Jesus Christ long before they are able to articulate the theology of regeneration and conversion. Slowly, we realize that what seemed a “simple” act—trusting in Christ—was in fact a complex experience of divine activity. The Holy Spirit needed to be secretly active, since “no one can say ‘Jesus is Lord’ except in the Holy Spirit” (1 Cor. 12:3). Woven into this work of grace, then, is the unnoticed activity of the Spirit as He persuades us that the Scriptures—our ultimate source for knowing Christ—are the Word of the God. Coming to this conviction … View Resource

  • Living Reasonably in an Unreasonable Age Article by Don Bailey

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2016

    Before my call to pastoral ministry, I worked in a family garden center business. There I witnessed firsthand the growth of the modern consumer mentality. In the 1980s, large garden center chain stores had adopted the 100 percent money-back guarantee for a customer’s dead plant. Soon, our small family business met with more demanding and unreasonable customers. A man would approach our storefront with a dead azalea and a soured countenance. “Do you think,” I might ask, “that while you were in the Bahamas, your plant might have suffered a lack of water?” The angry retort would invariably follow … View Resource

  • Man Article by Michael Horton

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2016

    Secular humanism has no way of explaining either the greatness or the tragedy of human existence. However, the biblical story of creation and the fall provides the basis for affirming both human dignity and depravity. We are born into the world “in Adam,” that is, as glorious traitors. Glorious in Every Way God created us for His glory. We exist for Him, not He for us. And yet, unlike the rest of creation, we were created in God’s image for a special relationship with Him, naturally “endued with knowledge, righteousness, and true holiness, after his own image; having the … View Resource

  • The Resurrection Article by Guy Waters

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2016

    The resurrection of the dead is anathema to the modern mind. Rudolf Bultmann, one of the most famous New Testament scholars of the twentieth century and a theological liberal, declared, “An historical fact which involves a resurrection from the dead is utterly inconceivable.” To the Apostle Paul, however, Christianity without the resurrection of Jesus from the dead was inconceivable (see 1 Cor. 15:1–11). In company with the other Apostles, Paul proclaimed the resurrection as the great fact upon which Christianity stands or falls. How do we tell jaded and skeptical people about the resurrection? Luke’s account of Paul … View Resource

  • Salvation Article by Guy Richard

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2016

    Because faith ordinarily comes by hearing the good news (Rom. 10:17), you and I need to be always ready to give an answer to everyone who asks us, “What must I do to be saved?” But we also need to be ready to share that answer with others even when they do not directly ask for it. That answer must lie at the heart of the message that we communicate to others, because it is the means that God generally uses to bring them to faith in Christ. There is perhaps no clearer answer to the question, “What must … View Resource

  • Terms for the Covenant Article by R.C. Sproul

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2016

    Reformed theology, as many have said, is covenant theology, for the concept of covenant has shaped the development of Reformed thinking. We should expect as much because of our doctrine of sola Scriptura, which says that the Bible is the only infallible authority for Christian faith and practice. Therefore, we want to structure all theological understanding according to Scripture. This demands covenant theology, since covenant is an organizing principle in Scripture. Given the importance of the biblical doctrine of covenant, all Christians should have at least a basic understanding of what the Bible means by the term covenant. In the … View Resource

  • Thinking about Change Article by Tim Challies

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2016

    As Christians, we look with ultimate hope to our ultimate future—the sure hope that we will be with God forever in a world free of sin and all its ugly effects. Christ will return, and what He has prepared for us will be more glorious than all we can ask or even imagine. It’s the immediate future that causes us anxiety, though. Our future and the futures of our children and grandchildren—these trouble us and cause us to fear. We live in a world where one of the few constants in life is change. Yet, God has given us … View Resource

  • Training Pastors Article by Iver Martin

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2016

    How important is your pastor’s training? If we believe in having ministers who preach, teach, and relate to the varied and many needs within our congregations, thorough training, as with any profession, is indispensable. Yet, for a variety of reasons, in the eyes of some Christians, theological education is at best negotiable and at worst dispensable. Some argue that Jesus’ disciples, despite not having had a theological education, became the most effective communicators of the gospel ever, just from having been “with Jesus.” So, accordingly, it follows that theological education is an unnecessary complication that gets in the way … View Resource

  • With Gentleness and Respect Article by Burk Parsons

    FROM TABLETALK | January 2016

    When people first hear the word apologetics, they typically think of our modern use of the word apology. They often conclude that the task of apologetics is apologizing for the Christian faith as if to say we are sorry for our faith. However, the word apologetics derives from the Greek word apologia, which means “to give an answer” or “to make a defense.” Apologetics is not an apology, it’s an answer—a defense of what we believe. In his first epistle, Peter writes, “In your hearts honor Christ the Lord as holy, always being prepared to make a defense to anyone … View Resource